Germplasm Enhancement of Maize

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Accomplishments
- at Ames location
- at Raleigh location
- from public
TAC Meeting
GEM Review
Personnel Update
Publicity
GEM SCA
Nursery
Winter Nursery
Yield Trials
YT Summary
Lab Reports
- Starch Quality
- Lab Development
- Grain Quality

GEM - 2000 Annual Report

2000 Accomplishments

 Ames Location

  • Nearly 12,000 yield plots were conducted at or coordinated from Ames.

  • Twenty-two breeding crosses were selected for advancement by Ames.

  • Over 1800 topcrossed lines will be available for Corn Belt yield testing in 2001.  In addition, topcrosses of breeding crosses made since 1996 will be available for yield testing.

  • In trials at Ames, 94 topcrossed S2 lines from GEM breeding crosses beat the average of commercial check hybrids.

  • Our yearly field day was held on September 20 at the CAD Uthe farm in Ames.

  • A total of 12 public cooperator projects were partially supported financially by GEM.

  • GEM now includes a subproject devoted to popcorn enhancement.  With this project, we added 11 additional private cooperators (Ag Alumni Seed, AgriLink Feeds Inc., Amaizin Pop, American Pop Corn Co., ConAgra Grocery Products, Crookham Co., Iowa Acres, McHone Seed Co. Inc., Meade Seed Co., Schlessman Seed Co., Weaver Popcorn Co.) and one public cooperator (Ken Ziegler, Iowa State University).

  • In addition to the popcorn cooperators, GEM gained three additional private cooperators (AgriSource Co. Ltd. from Thailand, Aventis CropScience USA LP, and Nidera Semillas S.A. from Argentina).

  • Several Set A lines for release had elevated protein contents including S3 lines from CH05015:N12 with 14.6% protein, CHIS775:S1911b with 14.6% protein and DREP150:N2011d with 14.9% protein on a dry matter basis.

  • Additionally, in the Set A lines for release several CH05015:N12  S3 lines had elevated oil contents which included 6.6% oil, 5.6% and 4.7% on a dry matter basis. 

  • Also in the Set A lines for release two S3 lines from CH05015:N15 had over 73% and 72% starch contents and another FS8B(T):N1802  S3 line had over 71% starch content on a dry matter basis.

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Raleigh Location

  • Over15,000 yield trial plots at 19 locations were conducted at or coordinated through the Raleigh location in 2000.

  • Approximately 190 entries were in second year trials; over 1300 entries were in first year trials.

  • Eleven cooperators (6 companies, 4 universities, and 1 ARS) grew GEM trials coordinated through the Raleigh location at 19 locations across the south, east, and lower Midwest.

  • Approximately 30 GEM 50% tropical breeding populations are at various stages of advancement at the Raleigh location.

  • Almost 1500 GEM entries were testcrossed either by hand or in isolation blocks at Raleigh this summer.  Additional entries will be testcrossed this winter.

  •  Approximately 950 nursery rows were devoted to advancing GEM materials at Raleigh along with 160 observation plots.

  • Over 600 rows of disease plots devoted to GEM materials were grown in 2000.

  • Nineteen S2 or S3 lines were increased for release and sent to Ames for value testing and release.

  • A new seed storage unit is being built at Raleigh to handle the increasing volume of seed generated by GEM.  A new (but used) van has been transferred to the project.

Public Cooperators

  • Javier Betran at Texas A&M is developing lines from nine breeding crosses (CUBA173:S04, AR16021:S09, DKB830:S19, AR16021:S08c02, AR16026:S1704, AR16026:N1209, AR13026:N08c09, DREP150:N2011d, AR17026:N1019) selected based on agronomic performance and adaptation in two years of yield evaluations in Texas, and on grain quality traits.

  • Larry Darrah, USDA-ARS at Columbia MO, conducted yield trials (checks included) that averaged 134.4 bu/a for the testcrosses of UR13085:S1912 to CarPop(E5)C5, and 146.8 bu/a for the testcrosses to Mo17 Synthetic(H14).

  • James Hawk, University of Delaware, identified nine lines for further advancement and evaluation on two testers at additional locations for 2001.  These lines had comparable yields and grain moisture to the commercial check hybrids and averaged 182 bu/a compared to the test average of 168 bu/a at the two Delaware locations.  Three had particularly good agronomic traits.

  • Bruce Hibbard, USDA-ARS at Columbia MO in rootworm evaluations found the breeding cross AR16026:N1210 less damaged than the insecticide control, and FS8A(T):N1802 and FS8A(S):S0907 significantly less damaged than the susceptible control, B37xH84.  In European corn borer stalk tunneling evauations, 51 breeding crosses were less damaged than the resistant check, Mycogen 7250, and in leaf feeding evalutions, 12 breeding crosses were less damaged than the resistant checks Mycogen 7250 and Pioneer Brand 3184.

  • Robert Lambert at University of Illinois found a set of 8 BR51501:N11a12 S4 lines that performed above the mean in testcrosses and had desirable multiple disease levels and starch composition values, and selected a set of 14 S3 lines  of DREP150:N2012 based on testcross performance, multiple disease resistance, and starch composition values.  The lines are being testcrossed across sets this winter.

  • Ken Russell, University of Nebraska, is evaluating 32 breeding crosses plus checks for concentration of total phosphorus in the grain using x-ray analysis.  Corn with lower total phosphorus levels in the grain will be valuable for cattle feed.  Low phytate corn does not solve the problem of excess phosphorus for cattle diets because they are able to digest phytate.

  • Richard Pratt, Ohio State University, evaluated S2 testcrosses of FS8A(S):S09 lines derived in both Ohio and Iowa in 10-11 locations.  In addition to yield, the topcrosses were evaluated for grain quality.  The highest protein values in Iowa and Ohio testcrosses were 0.7 to 1.0 percentage points higher than the highest check and oil values were 0.3 to 0.4 percentage points higher.

  • Margaret Smith of Cornell University has been developing lines derived from FS8B(T):N1802, CH04030:S0906, AR01150:N0406, and GOQUEEN:N1603.  At the S5 level, uniform resistance to anthracnose stalk rot resistance is being achieved and levels of resistance look good.  Testcross results will allow selection of the best yielding lines.

  • Dennis West of University of Tennessee is incorporating into his program southern GEM lines shown to have potential to contribute useful genes to local germplasm.

  • Jim Coors at University of Wisconsin, found a topcrossed S2 line that had the highest forage yield and milk/acre his trial.  The line was derived from UR13085:N0204.  Several other GEM S2 topcrosses had above average forage yield as well as nutritional characteristics.  In another trial of S2 topcrosses, a line derived from DKXL212:N11a had the highest forage yield and milk/acre in the trial.

  • Wenwei Xu, with Texas A&M in Lubbock, found that BVIR103:S04, DKXL380:S08a, DKB830:S19, GUAT209:N19, CUBA117:S15, and CUBA164:S20 may be new sources of corn earworm resistance.

  • Mark Campbell (Truman State University) is developing lines from GEM breeding crossed with the recessive amylose-extender (ae) allele to achieve starch-amylose values that have at least 65% amylose.  Numerous selections from GUAT209:S13 x  (Oh43xH99ae) and CUBA110:N1711 x (Oh43xH99ae) have starch-amylose levels at or exceeding 70%).

  

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Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) Meetings

December 7, 1999, Chicago, IL:  A committee of Dave Harper, Kevin Montgomery, Heip Pham, and Dirk Benson was formed to provide more input on the cost of running a GEM breeding program, the cost of the inbreds donated in the breeding crosses, and other in kind support.  Ken Ziegler of Iowa State University discussed a protocol the popcorn breeders would use as a subgroup of GEM.

March 2, 2000, Chicago:  We decided to eliminate our June meeting and meet only three times per year in March, September, and December.  We discussed the upcoming ARS review and GEMs relationship to genomics.

September 19 and 20 2000, Ames, IA:  Items discussed included ARS response to the review in March, using molecular markers to determine percentage contribution of adapted germplasm to derived lines, line release policy, and suggestions for line characterization.

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GEM Review

ARS held a review of GEM on March 20-22 in Ames, IA.  The review team consisted of William Kuhn (co-chair), Charles Stuber (co-chair), Rob Robinson, Randy Holley, James Coors, and James Hawk.

 

Personnel Update

Ames:  Mack Shen continued as acting Data Manager and Penny Meyerholz continued as temporary Agricultural Research Technician. 

Raleigh:  Joe Hudyncia is a field technician assigned to the GEM program.   Vickie Brewster is continuing to serve as a Support Scientist, with 40% of her time devoted to GEM data compilation, regional yield trial coordination, and disease trait evaluation.

TSG:  Randy Holley and Jerry Arnold were elected until 2002 to replace Dana Eaton and Heip Pham.  

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Publicity

  • GEMEnhancing Exotic Germplasm of Corn.  Technology 2000 Supplement to Seed World.  December 1999.

  • Goodman, M. M., Moreno, J. M., Fernando Castillo, G., Holley, R. N., and Carson, M. L. 2000.  Using tropical maize germplasm for temperate breeding.  Maydica (accepted for publication)

  • Betran, F.J., A. Bockholt, and L. Rooney.  1999. Blue Corn. 1999. IN: Specialty Corns. A.R. Hallauer (ed.) CRC. Boca Raton, Florida, USA.

  • Campbell, M.R. J. Sykes and D.V. Glover.  Accepted for publication.  Classification of Single- and Double-Mutant Maize Endosperm Genotypes by Near-Infrared Transmittance Spectroscopy.  Cereal Chem.

  • Campbell, M.R. H. Yeager, N. Abdubeck, L.M. Pollak and D, V. Glover.  2000. Comparison of Methods for Amylose Screening Among ae Maize Starches form Exotic Backgrounds.  American Assoc. of Cereal Chem, annual meeting, Kansas City, Missouri.

  • Pratt, R.C.  Presentations on maize production in Ohio, breeding for resistance to diseases of maize, and introgression breeding.  Northwestern University of Agricultural Sciences, Maize Institute, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, P.R. China.  12/11 to 12/20/99.

  • Pollak, Linda.  December 1999.  Evaluation of genetic resources in maize (LAMP).  Shaanxi Maize Institute, Yangling, PRC (Invited).

  • Pollak, Linda.  December 1999.  Utilization of genetic resources in maize (GEM).  Shaanxi Maize Institute, Yangling, PRC (Invited).

  • Pollak, Linda.  December 1999.  Results of GEM-yield and agronomic characteristics of exotic by adapted breeding crosses and their derived lines.  Shaanxi Maize Institute, Yangling, PRC (Invited).

  • Pollak, Linda.  December 1999.  Evaluation, use, and breeding of value-added traits of maize--(compositional characters, protein quality, starch quality, oil).  Shaanxi Maize Institute, Yangling, PRC (Invited).

  • Pollak, Linda.  December 1999.  Using a fast-track breeding method to improve value-added characteristics of maize.  Shaanxi Maize Institute, Yangling, PRC (Invited).

  • Pollak, Linda.  December 1999.  Using wild relatives to improve value-added characteristics of maize.  Shaanxi Maize Institute, Yangling, PRC (Invited).

  • Pollak, Linda.  December 1999.  Broadening the genetic base of U.S. maize hybrids in the context of current agricultural conditions.  Shaanxi Maize Institute, Yangling, PRC (Invited).

  • Pollak, Linda and Wilfredo Salhuana.  2000.  U.S. Germplasm enhancement for maize project (U.S.-GEM).  In H.D. Cooper and C. Spillane (eds.).  Broadening the Genetic Bases of Crop Production.  IPGRI/FAO, Rome.

  • Santos, M.X., L.M. Pollak, C.A.P. Pacheco, P.E.O. Guimaraes, L.A. Peternelli, and S.N. Parenttoni.  2000.  Incorporating different proportions of exotic maize germplasm into two adapted populations.  Brazilian J. Genet. Molecular Biology 23:445-451.

  • Pollak, Linda.  2000.  Using germplasm from GEM to improve starch and oil quality in maize.  8th Interregional Corn Conf., Baltimore, MD.

  • Pollak, Linda.  2000.  The GEM project:  A model for improving corn in the tropics.  XLVI Reunion Annual del PCCMCA, San Juan, PR (invited).

  • Pollak, Linda.  2000.  Improving quality traits in corn.  XLVI Reunion Annual del PCCMCA, San Juan, PR (invited).

  • Pollak, Linda.  2000.  Utilization of genetic resources in maize:  GEM.  USDA-ARS National Program Staff, June 13, 2000, Beltsville, MD (invited).

  • Pollak, Linda.  2000.  Germplasm enhancement of maize.  Crop Germplasm Committee Chairs Meeting, July 20, 2000, Beltsville, MD (invited).

  • Pollak, Linda.  2000.  Accomplishments of germplasm enhancement in maize.  ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meetings, November 8, Minneapolis (invited).

  • Xu, W.W., T.L. Archer, L.P. Bradford, and L.M. Pollak.  2000.  Identification of drought tolerant and CEW resistant GEM germplasm.  ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meetings, November 8, Minneapolis.

  • GEM may offer new choices for corn producers.  ISU Daily.  September 19, 2000.

  • GEM:  Genetic Enhancement of Maize.  Corn Culture, The Newsletter for American OP Corn Breeders.  Volume 2000.

  • Kraja, A., and J.W. Dudley.  2000.  Identification of tropical and temperate maize populations having favorable alleles for yield and other phenotypic traits.  Crop Sci. 40:941-947.

  • Kraja, A., J.W. Dudley, and D.G. White.  2000.  Identification of tropical and temperate maize populations having favorable alleles for disease resistance.  Crop Sci. 40:948-954.  

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Public Cooperators Supported in 2000

Name

Amount $

Title

Bruce Hibbard 4500 Evaluation of 25% exotic GEM breeding crosses for western corn rootworm and European corn borer resistance.
Larry Darrah

4500

Evaluation of testcrosses of S1 lines of UR13085:S1912
Dennis West 5000 Evaluate GEM lines for release and other entries (100 total) for ear rot (FUS, GIB, and SUB).
Robert Lambert 5000 Development of corn inbreds from GEM germplasm with improved multiple disease resistance, starch concentration and grain yield.
Mark Campbell 3000 Development and evaluation of S2 lines from selected GEM germplasm and continued screening of LAMP germplasm for high starch amylose
Wenwei Xu 5000 Use of GEM Germplasm to Improve Drought Tolerance and Corn Earworm Resistance
Margaret Smith 5000 Anthracnose Stalk Rot Resistance from Exotic Maize Germplasm
Jim Hawk 4500 Inbred Line Development in the GEM Breeding Cross DKXL212:N11a and Yield and Agronomic Performance Evaluations under Delaware Irrigated and Dryland conditions in 2000.
Ken Russell 5000 Search for useable genetic variation in concentration of total phosphorus in the grain in GEM Breeding Crosses
Jim Coors 5050 Silage Evaluation of Topcrosses with Advanced Lines from GEM Breeding Crosses
Javier Betran 5000 Continuation of last year
Rich Pratt 3974 Agronomic performance and grain quality of top 10% of testcrosses from RP and LP selections in replicated tests in two locations and per se grain quality and agronomic performance of selected lines per se in replicated tests

Raleigh Public Cooperators Major Goodman (NC State U.), Neil Widstrom (USDA-ARS, Tifton, GA), Jim Hawk (U. of Delaware), Dennis West (U. of Tennessee), Chuck Poneliet (U. of Kentucky), Javier Betran (Texas A&M U.).  

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2000 Cooperative Nursery Work

Private In-kind Nursery Support Summer 2000

Company

Breeding Cross

AgSource

Breeding Crosses

Becks

Ten regenerations

Bo-Jac

Advance CUBA164:S2008d to S1s

Cargill

Advance AR13035:S11b28 to S2s  
Topcross FS8B(T):N1802 and CASH:N1410 S2s

Monsanto

Advance CUBA164:S1517 to S2s  
Recombine lines of AR16026:S1704  

FFR

Advance AR01150:N0406 to S1s

Garst

Advance PASCO14:S0105 to S2s  
Advance DKXL212:N11a01 to S1s  
Recombine lines of AR16026:S1719  
Evaluate 1997 Lines  for GLS  

GlobalAgro

Advance DREP150:N2011d to S2s

Golden Harvest

Advance ANTIG01:S0205 to S2s  
Four regenerations  
Ten reps of Set B lines for increase
Breeding Crosses

Gowan

Advance AR01150:N0420 to S1s

Great Lakes

Advance AR16021:S0908b to S2s  
Recombine lines of DKXL370:N11a20

Hoegemeyer Hybrids

Advance DREP150:N2011d to S2s

Holdens Foundation Seeds

Advance ANTIG01:N1605 to S2s  
Advance GUAT209:N1925 to S2s
Recombine lines of UR10001:S1813

Hyland

Breeding Crosses

Limagrain

Advance PASCO14:N0424 to S2s  
Advance CHIS775:N1920 to S1s

National Starch

CUBA115:S15 for starch quality

NC+

Advance AR16021:S0908b to S2s

Novartis

Major Goodman support

PAU Seeds

Advance FS8B(T):N11a08a to S2s

Pioneer H-Bred

Advance CUBA164:S2012 to S2s  
Some Set C increases

Professional Seed Res.

Disease Evaluations

Seed Consultants

Breeding Crosses

Seed Direct

Only yield tests

Wilson Genetics LLC

Advance FS8B(T):N11a08a to S2s

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Private In-kind Nursery Support Winter 2000-2001

Company

Breeding Cross

AgSource

Evaluate lines

Aventis

Breeding Crosses

Beck's Hybrids

Make S1's CH05015:N1206

Bo-Jac Hybrid

Make S1's CH04030:S09

Cargill Hybrid

Topcross AR13035:S11b28 S2's
Topcross CASH:N1410 S2's
Topcross FS8B(T):N1802 GEM S2's

Cerestar

Evaluating Set C lines for Starch Quality

FFR Cooperative

Make S1's CUBA164:S2012 (share with Maharlika)

Garst Seed Company

Topcross S2's PASCO14:S0105
Breeding Crosses
Make S1's CH05015:N1219

Golden Harvest

Topcross S2's ANTIG01:S0205
Make S1's FS8B(S):S17a
Make S1's FS8B(S):S17b

Great Lakes Hybrid

Topcross S2's AR16021:S0908b (shared with NC+)
Make S1's AR01150:S01
Breeding Crosses

Hoegemeyer Hybrid

Topcross S2's DREP150:N2011d (share with Global Agro)

Holden's Foundation Seeds

Topcross S2's ANTIG01:N1605
Topcross S2's GUAT209:N1925
Breeding crosses

Limagrain Genetics

Topcross S2's PASCO14:N0424
Breeding crosses

Maharlika Genetics

Make S1's BARBGP2:N08a18
Make S1's BR51501:S11a17
Make S1's DK212T:N11a12
Make S1's CUBA164:S2012

Monsanto

Topcross S2's CUBA164:S1517
Make S1's CH05015:N1502

National Starch

according to their protocol

NC+ Hybrids

Topcross AR16021:S0908b (shared with Great Lakes)
Breeding crosses

Nidera

Yield tests and making breeding crosses

Novartis

Major's

PAU Seeds

Topcross FS8B(T):N11a08a (shared with Wilson)
Breeding crosses

Pioneer Hi-Bred Int'l

Topcross CUBA164:S2012
Make S1's AR17056:N2035
Make S1's AR01150:N0407

Wilson Genetics LLC

Topcross FS8B(T):N11a08a (shared with PAU)
Breeding crosses

 

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2000 Cooperative Yield Testing

In all, there were 19 experiments ranging from six to eight replications, with a total of 119. The plot distributions among public/private cooperators and GEM staff are listed as followings:

Plots with Private Cooperators 8509
Plots with Public Cooperators 380
Plots in Ames 2645
TOTAL MIDWEST YIELD PLOTS: 11534

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2000 GEM Yield Test Entries

50% tropical breeding crosses 119
25% tropical breeding crosses 246
50% temperate breeding crosses 90
25% temperate breeding crosses 1084
Other breeding crosses 240
TOTAL ENTRIES 1779

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Private Cooperator Yield Trials   

Experiment

Cooperator 
Making
Topcross

%Exotic

Tester

Zone

Number of Entries

Number of Replications

00122

GEM

50%

SS

tropical

33

6

00123

GEM

50%

SS

tropical

86

6

00131

GEM

25%

nSS

tropical

60

6

00132

Pioneer

25%

nSS

tropical

120

6

00133

GEM

25%

SS

tropical

38

7

00134

GEM

25%

SS

tropical

28

7

00501

GEM

25%

SS

temperate

110

6

00521

GEM

50%

nSS

temperate

55

7

00522

GEM

25%

SS

temperate

35

6

00531

Cargill

25%

SS

temperate

55

5

00532

Monsanto

25%

nSS

temperate

98

6

00533

Golden Harvest

25%

nSS

temperate

180

7

00534

Great Lakes

25%

SS

temperate

50

6

00536

NC+

25%

SS

temperate

63

6

00537

NC+

25%

nSS

temperate

39

6

00538

Pioneer

25%

nSS

temperate

228

6

00539

Garst

25%

SS

temperate

150

6

00540

GEM

25%

nSS

temperate

221

6

00621

GEM

both

both

both

130

8

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Summary of Yield Trial 2000

Experiment  

Cooperators
Making Topcross  

Tester Type

Number of Entries

Number of Replications  

19  

9

10-SS & 8-nSS  

1779  

119

 

Data Summary CD

The GEM Project Data Summary provides a complete overview of GEM results throughout the year. The 2000 GEM Data Summary book will contain yield data from all trials both public and private.  Public cooperator summaries and data will be also featured as available.  The book will be available at the NCR-167 meetings in February as a Compact Disk.  

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Laboratory Report

Starch Quality

The analysis of the Fast Track lines for starch quality traits is completed. Several S3 lines were interesting for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) characters because of their narrow gelatinization ranges. Corn Belt starch gelatinization ranges are between 9 and 11C and the selection target value of < 5C. Narrow range of gelatinization indicates that the starch granules are homogeneous and the starch will cook over a narrow temperature range.  The most interesting lines include:

  • DK212T:S0610-10-1-3 with 4.7C

  • DK212T:S0610-25-1-1 with 4.7C

  • CUBA164:S2008a-6-1-2 with 4.9C

Additionally, several lines had high %R values, this may indicate a highly retrogradable starch or more crystalline-stable starch. Corn Belt starch typically has 40 to 50% R and the target value is >80%R. These starches have potential as a new source of dietary fiber. The lines include:

  • DK212T:S0610-10-1-1 with 64.9%R

  • DK212T:S0610-34-1-1 with 69.1% R

  • CUBA164:S2008a-6-1-2 with 65.6%R

  • CUBA164:S2008a-6-1-3 with 65.0%R

Additionally, DSC data for the 1999 GEM lines are complete. DK212T:S0610-14-1-B had a very narrow range of gelatinization. These kernels had gel ranges of 5.2 to 7.1 degrees Celsius compared to Corn Belt of 8 to 11 degrees Celsius.

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Advanced Product Development

Starch quality is one of the most important quality traits of interest in the GEM corn lines. In screening the germplasm the targeted starch traits are often found to be segregating widely on the ear.  The starch quality analysis is destructive so the kernels that had the trait cannot be grown to get more seed. Therefore, sister kernels on the source ear have to be grown to try to recover the trait. Then the process is repeated and hopefully after many generations the trait can be fixed so that it is found in most of the kernels on the ear. This process is very time consuming and expensive both in the field and the laboratory. We needed a means to test the individual kernels and regenerate the plant from the same seed.

The Advanced Product Development (APD) experiment was initiated to speed up the inbreeding process for starch traits. Essentially what we are doing is soaking the kernels to soften them. Then we separate the kernel into the endosperm and embryo. The endosperm goes through our bench top wet mill process to extract the starch. The starch is washed, dried, and analyzed for thermal properties with the DSC. The embryo is aseptically germinated on a nutrient media until roots and shoots are developed and then it is transferred to soil. The plants are grown in the climate controlled growth chamber until they are big enough to go to the greenhouse. There they are grown until maturity. The plants are self-pollinated, the seed harvested and tested for starch traits. The whole process is repeated until the ear is fully inbred. This process enables the new starch lines to be ready for commercialization several seasons sooner than the traditional method.

For validation of the method, three replications of two Corn Belt inbred lines, B73 and Mo17, and one Corn Belt hybrid, B73 x Mo17, and five GEM lines are being extracted, tested, their embryos grown on media and many have been transplanted to the greenhouse.  Assuming favorable results, ADP will be incorporated into the research and development phase of GEM.

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Grain Quality

The grain quality data from the NIR is complete for Set A lines grown in three locations (Clinton, Ill., Hawaii, and Puerto Rico) and the Set B lines grown in Iowa.  The outstanding results for each experiment of Set A lines grown in 1999 in Clinton, Ill: CH05015:N12-131-1-B-B with 14.64% DMB protein and CHIS775:S1911b-16-1-B-B with 14.62% DMB protein, CH05015:N12-43-1-B-B with 5.56 % DMB oil and FS8B (T):N1802-35-1-B-B with 71.10% DMB starch.

In Set A lines grown in Hawaii the results included: DREP150:N2011d-13-1-B-B with 14.9% DMB protein, CHO5015:N12-7-1-B-B with 14.1% DMB protein, CHO5015:N12-43-1-B-B with 6.6% DMB oil and CHO5015:N15-8-1-B-B with 71.8% starch also FS8B(T):N1802-35-1-B-B with 71.6% DMB starch and CHO5015:N15-149-1-B-B with 71.5% DMB starch.

In the Set A lines grown in Puerto Rico the results included: CH05015:N12-183-1-B-B with 13.7% DMB protein, CUBA164:S2008a-6-1-B-B with 13.7% DMB protein, CH05015:N12-43-1-B-B with 4.7% DMB oil, CH05015:N12-13-1-B-B with 4.5% DMB oil, CH05015:N15-8-1-B-B with 73.1% DMB starch and CH05015:N12-50-1-B-B with 72.2% DMB starch.

In the Set B lines the results included: AR01150:N04-133-1-B with 14.2% DMB protein, Cuba164:S15-192-1-B with 5.6% DMB oil, Cuba164:S2008a-280-1-B with 5.34% DMB oil, AR16035:S02-443-1-B with 71.1% DMB starch, and SCRO1:N1310-489-1-B with 71.0% DMB starch.

Additional NIR data for GEM lines include ANTIGO:S0225 S1s with high % starch, up to 73% compared to Corn Belt with 69 to 71%, ANTIG03:N12 S1s lines with high starch, 73.6%, 73.5% etc., BARBGP2:N08a18 S1s with some very high % starch lines, 74.2,73.3% etc.  BARBGP2:N08d S1s had several lines high in protein, 14.9%, 14.6% etc. compared to Corn Belt with 9 to 12% protein.  BR51403:N16-S1s had several lines with over 14% protein, 14.5%, 14.5% etc.  BR51403:S02 S1s also were high in protein with 15.8, 15.1 etc.

 

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We are grateful to our Cooperators for their support!

 


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