RESEARCH PROJECTS

Reid G. Palmer

Susana Goggi

Katherine Espinosa

Lauren Brown

Grace Kaudzu

Reid G. Palmer

MAJOR RESEARCH INTERESTS:

Our research in genetics and cytogenetics of soybean (Glycine max) includes developing aneuploid lines to use in linkage determinations. If soybeans are indeed polyploid, survival of novel chromosome combinations should be feasible. Genetic mutants are being isolated, and are characterized and located on a chromosome by using these aneuploids. Phenotypic and biochemical effects of individual chromosomes are being determined by using these aneuploids.

Developmental studies of microsporogenesis and megasporogenesis of various meiotic mutants involve both light and electron microscopy. These studies provide information on the meiotic process in higher plants and help in selection of sterility systems that could perhaps be used to produce hybrid soybeans for use in breeding techniques. A new method of hybrid soybean production, the Cosegregation Method, utilizes close genetic linkage between a male-sterility locus, Ms6, and a seedling marker locus, W1. This closely-linked marker system allows identification of male-sterile plants at the seedling stage and improves hybrid seed production through greater efficiency and higher yield of hybrid seed per male-sterile plant. The Cosegregation Method was could be used to facilitate S1 and half-sib (population or inbred line as tester) recurrent selection for population improvement of complex agronomic traits by improving evaluation through the elimination of male-sterile plants as seedlings, and by allowing greater control of parental contributions during intermating. Development and use of the Cosegregation Method could assist in the elucidation of the genetic control of complex traits, the identification of lines to improve these traits, the improvement of populations for these traits through the use of recurrent selection, and determination of the agronomic potential of commercial hybrid soybean.

An unstable allele affecting flower color is suspected to be the result of a transposable element. Traditional genetic tests support our views that the instability is the result of a transposon. New mutants occur at a high frequency in this genotype. Nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions between cytoplasmically-inherited yellow mutants and nuclearly-inherited mutants have been identified.

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Susana Goggi

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Katherine Espinosa

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Lauren Brown

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Grace Kaudzu

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