The 1960s: A Bibliography

By Rebecca Jackson
Iowa State University Library

The 1960s was a pivotal period in our country's history. It was the time when the "baby boomers" were coming of age, in high schools, colleges, even as soldiers in the military. Especially for the "boomers" it was an age of upheaval because of many factor at the time: the civil rights movement, the Vietnam war, protest against the Vietnam war, big government, the women's movement, the gay movement--the social and political movements of that time were significant, and were affected by the great size of the "Boomer" generation.

The time period covered by this bibliography is circa 1960 to 1974, an unusual "decade," to be sure. But because the Civil Rights movements and Watergate framed this era, it became impossible to compile a bibliography on the 1960s without entering the 1970s. The Vietnam war did not end until 1975, which would seem a logical place to end the decade. However, Nixon's resignation sparked more public interest and energy than did the anti-climax of the end of the war. Thus, the time period covered. Although there are some key books on the Civil Rights Movement, which started in the late 1950s, that movement has been adequately covered in other resources.

This bibliography is the result of a citation study of books being cited by other, more recent books on the 1960s. In other words, this is a annotated list of books that have been cited more than five times by more recent books on the 1960s (a list of the citing books is included at the end). Many of the annotations come from my 1992 book, The 1960s: An Annotated Bibliography of Social and Political Movements in the United States (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press). Many more of the titles here are not in that collection.

The arrangement of the bibliography is in great measure determined by the call numbers given to these materials by the Library of Congress. In some cases, I have overridden this classification and put titles where I thought they seemed more logical. This is a selective bibliography and in no way includes everything published on this era. All of the materials should be of interest to anyone contemplating further research in the 1960s.

African-Americans

Baldwin, James. The fire next time. New York: Dial Press, 1963.
Includes the essays "My Dungeon Shook: Letter to my nephew on the one hundredth anniversary of the emancipation" and "Down at the Cross: Letter from a region in my mind." Powerful reflections on Baldwin's experiences of being black in America in the mid-20th century.

Bartley, Numan V. The rise of massive resistance: race and politics in the south during the 1950s. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1969.
A study of the white resistance in the south to school desegregation as a result of the 1954 Supreme Court integration ruling. The author claims she has focused on the more conservative aspects of southern politics. Also, since this is a study of white resistance, black political participation is only cursorily mentioned.

Belfrage, Sally. Freedom Summer. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1965.
A narrative account of Freedom Summer, from basic training to jail, to the end of the summer, from a participant's point of view.

Bloom, Jack M. Class, race, and the civil rights movement. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1987.
An analysis of the civil rights movement which focuses on the southern class structure which depended on racial subordination. Bloom contends that the civil rights movement was successful because of a coalition of Southern business and middle classes, Northern middle classes, the Democratic party and the federal government.

Blumberg, Rhoda Lois. Civil rights: the 1960s freedom struggle. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1984.
Blumberg offers a sociological analysis of the civil rights movement, from 1955 to 1968. She traces the transitions from nonviolent resistance to black power and from struggles for basic freedoms to protest against the Vietnam conflict. A chronology is included.

Branch, Taylor. Parting the waters: America in the King years, 1954-63. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1988.
The first of Branch's books chronicling the civil rights movement. This one starts with Martin Luther King as a young man and proceeds to the end of the Kennedy presidency. Photos included.

__________. Pillar of fire: America in the King years, 1963-65. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1998.
A continuation of Parting the Waters, focusing primarily on Birmingham and King.

Breitman, George, ed. Malcolm X speaks: selected speeches and statements. New York: Grove Weidenfeld, 1990.
A selection of Malcolm X’s speeches from the last year of his life.

Brooks, Thomas R. Walls come tumbling down: a history of the civil rights movement, 1940-1970. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1974.
This book was written in 1974, not many years after the time period covered in the book. Books starts with "on the scene" coverage of the 1963 March on Washington and then proceeds to cover the history leading up the the civil rights movement

Brown, Elaine. A taste of power: a black woman's story. New York: Pantheon Books, 1992.
The biography of one of the black women involved with the black power movement. She was a member of the Black Panther Party. She became lover to Huey Newton, founder and leader of the Black Panthers. And then she became influential in the woman’s movement, especially black women. Photos included

Cagin, Seth. We are not afraid: the story of Goodman, Schwerner, and Chaney and the civil rights campaign for Mississippi. New York: Macmillan, 1988.
An in-depth analysis of the Goodman, Schwerner, and Chaney kidnapping and murder. No suspect was tried in the killing of these civil rights workers until 2005.

Carmichael, Stokely. Black power: the politics of liberation in America. New York: Random House, 1967.
This book is offered as a “framework” for blacks to exercise control over their lives, both personally and politically.

Carson, Clayborne. In struggle: SNCC and the black awakening of the 1960s. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1981.
A history of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee, focusing primarily on its intellectual development in three distinct stages.

Cleaver, Eldridge. Soul on ice. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1967.
One of the most famous books of the era both for black and white revolutionaries. Cleaver wrote these essays while in prison and they reflect the reading he did while there. In these autobiographical essays, Cleaver writes about black and white women, the revolutionary spirit, why blacks should revolt, and his alienation from United States society and culture.

Cone, James H. Martin & Malcolm & America: a dream or a nightmare? Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1991.
Cone explores the relationship between Martin Luther King and Malcolm X and their meaning for America. Cone is an African American theologian and his focus is on justice (King) and blackness (Malcolm X).

Crawford, Vicki L., Jacqueline Anne Rouse, and Barbara Woods. Women in the civil rights movement: trailblazers and torchbearers, 1941-1965. Brooklyn, NY: Carlson, 1990.
Papers from a conference of the same title held in 1988. Includes papers on Fannie Lou Hamer, women in the Montgomery bus boycott, the Free Southern Theater, and even Eleanor Roosevelt as an early civil rights advocate. Some photos included.

Dittmer, John. Local people: the struggle for civil rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.
Dittmer presents a history of the civil rights movement in a state that was one of the most racially repressive in the United States in the '50s and '60s. His account is accurate and sensitive, based on research and his own first-hand knowledge.

Du Bois, W.E.B. The souls of black folk. New York: Blue Heron, 1953.
Written in 1903, this is one of the first, and probably the most famous, book to argue against the hypocrisy of white America.

Fairclough, Adam. To redeem the soul of America: the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Martin Luther King, Jr. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1987.
An analysis of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the civil rights movement. SCLC was a more spiritual movement, in that it was founded on the church, but it also "excelled in the area that mattered most in the early 1960s: the theory and practice of nonviolent action." Fairclough feels that SCLC has been neglected and focus has been on Martin Luther King, Jr., the leader of SCLC. He has written this book because of SCLC's importance as more than just an extension of King and as a pivotal organization in civil rights history.

Farmer, James. Lay bare the heart: an autobiography of the civil rights movement. New York: Arbor House, 1985.
Farmer was one of the most important leaders in the struggle for civil rights. This is his story of that movement up to Nixon and the Watergate scandal.

Foner, Philip S., ed. The Black Panthers speak. New York: Da Capo Press, 2002.
A collection of documents from the Black Panther Party including the Black Panther National Anthem, the Party Platform, excerpts from Huey P. Newton, Bobby Seale, Eldridge Cleaver and others, Black Panther women, and community activities.

Forman, James. The making of black revolutionaries: a personal account. New York: Macmillan, 1972.
Forman subtitles this as a personal account. Forman was Executive Secretary of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and later Minster of Education for the Black Panther Party. This is his story of both, with detailed information on the Black Panther Party's hierarchy and leadership.

Garrow, David J. Bearing the cross: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. New York: W. Morrow, 1986.
Garrow's is one of the most frequently cited histories of the civil rights movement from 1955 to 1968. His focus is on Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, but it is impossible to thoroughly cover these two without covering most of the activities occurring during this time period.

__________. The FBI and Martin Luther King, Jr. New York: Penguin Books, 1981.
Garrow explains that this book attempts to explain why the FBI went after Martin Luther King throughout the 1960s. The reports generated about the FBI's activities were explicit, Garrow argues that nowhere in any of them is there an explanation of why the FBI devoted so much time and energy to spy on and in some cases harrass King.

__________. Protest at Selma: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1978.
Garrow said that in the ten years since the Voting Rights Act had passed, there was not one book published that told its story. This book was an attempt to do that.

Giddings, Paula. When and where I enter: the impact of black women on race and sex in America. New York: Morrow, 1984.
Spanning the time period of the Renaissance to contemporary times, Giddings, herself a black woman, has written a history of black women, not as blacks nor as women, but in their unique status of "black women," Giddings says it is an objective history with a "point of view or a sense of mission."

Goldfield, David R. Black, white and southern: race relations and southern culture, 1940 to the present. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1990.
Rather than a history of racism in the south, the author describes this book as "a southern story that begins by defining the sin of white supremacy" through explaining the southern culture that allowed it to flourish. He describes the changes that actually began in the 1930s and carried through to the present. Photos and illustrations are included.

Graham, Hugh Davis The civil rights era: origins and development of a national policy, 1960-1972. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990.
An exploration of what Graham calls a “paradigm shift” in federal policy in civil rights 1960-1972. He includes both racial and gender policy changes.

Grant, Joanne, comp. Black protest: history, documents, and analyses, 1619 to the present. New York: Fawcett World Library, 1969.
As the title says, this book is a collection of essays and documents from 1619 to about 1967. It includes such items as the Quaker Resolution Against Slavery, the Preamble of the Free African Society, John Brown's Last Written Statement, and SNCC's Statement on Vietnam. Writers include William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglas, Angelina Grimke, W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, and many others.

Hampton, Henry, and Steve Fayer. Voices of freedom: an oral history of the civil rights movement from the 1950s through the 1980s. New York: Bantam Books, 1990.
An outgrowth of the "Eyes on the Prize" series on PBS, this book is a record of interviews about the civil rights movement. It begins with interviews about the murder and trial of Emmett Till in 1955 and continues up to 198o and affirmative action.

Hilliard, David, and Lewis Cole. This side of glory: the autobiography of David Hilliard and the story of the Black Panther Party. Boston: Little, Brown, 1993.
One of the leading members of the Black Panther Party writes his history of the Party. Told in a narrative style, much like a novel. Includes photos.

Holt, Len. The summer that didn't end. New York: Morrow, 1965.
Julian Bond, in the introduction to this book, describes it as “a forgotten and ignored classic.” A personal and candid account of the 1963 Mississippi Freedom Summer.


King, Martin Luther, Jr. Stride toward freedom: the Montgomery story. New York: Harper & Row, 1968.
King’s account of the Montgomery bus boycott and the aftermath in Montgomery

__________. Where do we go from here: chaos or community? New York: Harper & Row, 1967.
King describes the civil rights movement up to 1965, when Johnson signed the 1965 Voting Rights Act. He writes about black power, racism and the white backlash, and being a “negro” in America. For him, blacks had made some progress in being treated decently, but the upcoming struggle was to achieve equality.

__________. Why we can't wait. New York: Harper & Row, 1964.
In this short book King explains why African Americans can wait no longer for their civil rights.

King, Mary. Freedom song: a personal story of the 1960s civil rights movement. New York: Morrow, 1987.
Mary King was a young white woman—a preacher’s daughter--in the south at the beginning of the civil rights movement. She quickly became active in the movement and this is her memoir of that movement, from a white woman’s perspective. Includes photos.

Lemann, Nicholas. The promised land: the great black migration and how it changed America. New York: A.A. Knopf, 1991.
The story of the black migration, 1940-1970, from the southern rural areas to the urban north. Lemann also deals with the policies that were created to keep the northern blacks poor and uneducated.

Marable, Manning. Race, reform and rebellion: the second reconstruction in black America, 1945-1982. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1984.
Marable seeks to explain the successes and failures of the civil rights movement and Black Power, and the lack of militancy and activism among African Americans today. The author believes that the presidencies of Reagan and Bush had a devastating effect on the lives of black Americans in the wake of the 1960s.

Martinez, Elizabeth Sutherland, ed. Letters from Mississippi. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2002.
A collection of letters home from the mostly white, northern volunteers of the 1964 Summer Freedom Campaign. Some photos included.

McAdam, Doug. Freedom Summer. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.
A study of the Freedom Summer campaign of 1964, or the Summer Project. McAdam interviewed over 50 participants in the project and carefully analyzed the activities of the project and the ramifications it had on the subsequent 1960s movements. Photos included.

__________. Political process and the development of black insurgency, 1930-1970. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1982.
A theoretical study of social movements, institutionalized political power, and insurgency using the black protest movement as a focus. Academic and theoretical, the book does cover a significant time period, giving historical perspective to the study of the movement.

Meier, August, and Elliott Rudwick, eds. Black protest in the sixties. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1970.
A collection of readings on the civil rights movement and black protest. Most of the readings came from the New York Times.

__________.CORE: a study in the civil rights movement, 1942-1968. New York: Oxford University Press, 1973.
A study of the rise and fall of one of the strongest civil rights organizations in the movement. Meier and Rudwick document the successes and failures and the major campaigns of the group. Probably the most in-depth study of CORE.

Mills, Nicolaus. Like a holy crusade: Mississippi, 1964--the turning of the civil rights movement in America. Chicago: I.R. Dee, 1992.
An analysis of the Freedom Summer Campaign in 1964. Mills, like McAdam relied heavily on interviews with the people involved. The title comes from a conversation with John Lewis, 20 years after the Summer Project for registering voters in Mississippi.

Moody, Anne. Coming of age in Mississippi. New York: Dial Press, 1968.
An autobiographical account of what it was like to grow up poor and black in the south in the 1950s and 1960s. Moody was involved in the Jackson Woolworth's counter protests, and after college became very involved in the civil rights movement.

Morris, Aldon D. The origins of the civil rights movement: black communities organizing for change. New York: Free Press, 1970.
A research study of the movements, many local ones not covered elsewhere, during the decade 1953-1963. Another object of the study, according to Morris, was “the role of the black masses in the civil rights movement.” Morris interviewed a number of people for the book, including Rev. Ralph Abernathy, Ella Baker, Julian Bond, James Farmer, Rosa Parks, and many others.

Muse, Benjamin. Ten years of prelude: the story of integration since the Supreme Court's 1954 decision. New York: Viking Press, 1964.
A review of the impact of the Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court Decision in 1954 up to the date of the book—1964.

O'Reilly, Kenneth. "Racial matters": the FBI's secret file on black America, 1960-1972. New York: Free Press, 1989.
O'Reilly chronicles the adversarial role the FBI played in the civil rights struggles from the early 1960s to the end of the Black Panther Party.

Payne, Charles M. I've got the light of freedom: the organizing tradition and the Mississippi freedom struggle. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.
An examination of the civil rights movement in Greenville, Mississippi, and the tradition of community organizing among blacks in the South.

Pearson, Hugh. The shadow of the panther: Huey Newton and the price of black power in America. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1994.
A history of the Black Panther Party from its conception in California, with a special focus on Huey Newton. Photos included.

Powledge, Fred. Free at last? The civil rights movement and the people who made it. Boston: Little Brown, 1991.
Powledge believes that the civil rights movement of the ‘50s and ‘60s is being simplified today, with many misconceptions being spread about the roles of individuals and the attitudes of many. His story was written to put an end to this oversimplification.

Raines, Howell. My soul is rested: movement days in the deep south remembered. New York: Putnam, 1977.
A telling of the story of the civil rights movement by the people who lived it. Raines, a former newspaper reporter, interviewed many of the most important people in the movement—James Farmer, Rosa Parks, Bayard Rustin, Julian Bond, Fannie Lou Hamer—and many others whose names are not well-known, but were equally important to the movement.

Ralph, James. Northern protest, Martin Luther King, Jr., Chicago and the civil rights movement. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1993.
The campaign in Chicago to protest inequality in housing and opportunities for blacks was the first time SCLC had targeted a northern city for its non-violent demonstrations and activity. This is the story of that campaign, 1965-1967.

Robinson, Jo Ann Gibson. The Montgomery bus boycott and the women who started it: the memoir of Jo Ann Gibson Robinson. Edited by David J. Garrow. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1987.
Robinson was the head of the Women’s Political Council, a group that was instrumental in working for the rights of black people in Montgomery. This is really a memoir of that group and Montgomery in the years before and after the boycott.

Rothschild, Mary Aickin. A case of black and white: northern volunteers and the southern freedom summers, 1964-1965. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1982.
An examination of the Southern Freedom Summers of 1964-1965 and the northern youth, the”cream of the northern students” who volunteered to help with them. Rothschild believes that these summers marked a turning point in the civil rights movement.

Sellers, Cleveland. The river of no return: the autobiography of a black militant and the death of SNCC. New York: Morrow, 1973.
Sellers was one of the leaders of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He chronicles his own life, as well as the life of SNCC.

Sitkoff, Harvard. The struggle for black equality, 1954-1980. New York: Hill & Wang, 1981.
A concise history of the civil rights struggle, not meant to represent a comprehensive or scholarly analysis.

United States. Kerner Commission. Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1968.
In 1967, Johnson appointed the Kerner Commission to study the roots of the civil disturbances in the U.S. related mainly to African Americans and the widening gap between them and white America. This is the report of that Commission.

Van Deburg, William L. New day in Babylon: the black power movement and American culture, 1965-1975. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992.
A comprehensive account and interpretation of the black power movement and its impact on African-Americans and the broader American culture of then and now.

Washington, James Melvin, ed. A testament of hope: the essential writings of Martin Luther King, Jr. San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1986.
A collection of King’s writings, sermons and public addresses.

Weisbrot, Robert. Freedom bound: a history of America's civil rights movement. New York: Norton, 1990.
“This book explores the peak years of the struggle for racial equality in America, with a special focus on the increasingly turbulent relations between black activists and white liberals.”

Westheider, James E. Fighting on two fronts: African Americans and the Vietnam war. New York: New York University Press, 1997.
Vietnam was the first war in which African Americans were totally segregated with whites in the armed forces. And at the beginning of the war, African Americans saw armed service as a chance for economic advancement, volunteering in record numbers. However, beginning in 1968, racial problems began to surface in the armed services. This book explores the factors that led to the racial problems in the later years of the Vietnam war.

Woodward, C. Vann. The strange career of Jim Crow. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.
The Jim Crow laws were southern laws that dictated segregation of blacks and the supremacy of whites. They regulated segregation of churches, schools, housing, jobs and even eating and drinking and public restrooms. Woodward examines the disintegration of these codes, beginning with the 1954 Supreme Court decision, Brown vs. Board of Education.

Young, Andrew. An easy burden: the civil rights movement and the transformation of America. New York: HarperCollins Publisher, 1996.
An autobiography but also a chronicle of the civil rights movement and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference up to 1972. Photos included

The Arts

Banes, Sally. Greenwich Village 1963: avant-garde performance and the effervescent body. Durham: Duke University Press, 1993.
Calling New York City the international center of the visual art world, Banes documents the art/cultural world in Greenwich Village in 1963 and tries to show how this cultural center reflected and influenced the cultural and political changes that typified the 1960s. She covers music, theater, dance, literature, painting and sculpture, and the general culture of the area. Photos included.

Hewison, Robert. Too much: art and society in the sixties, 1960-75. London: Methuen, 1986.
British art and literature and the society which produced it. Includes visual arts, music, theatre, poetry, and films.

Louvre, Alf, and Jeffrey Walsh, eds. Tell me lies: cultural battles for the meaning of the war. Philadelphia: Open University Press, 1988.
Examines the cultural depictions of the war in such popular culture venues as films, books, cultural criticism, comic books, poetry, and music. Gathers writings which offer perspectives that are non-American and thus non-American-centric.

Smith, Richard Candida. Utopia and dissent: art, poetry and politics in California. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.
Smith covers the convergence of art and politics in California from post-WWII through the sixties. Not a survey of the art world, Smith says the book focuses on “the analysis of ideas and the influence those ideas had upon both aesthetic practice ad the conceptions of the relationship of self to society. . . .” (xix). Photos included.

Warhol, Andy, and Pat Hackett. Popism: the Warhol '60s. New York: Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, 1980.
Warhol tells his story of the 1960s culture as he saw it. He looks at painting, movies, fashion, music, and the people who made it all happen. Photos included.

Biography

Baez, Joan. And a voice to sing with: a memoir. New York: Summit Books, 1987.
Baez's autobiography was written just before she did her first new album in six years. She says she is writing for three reasons: 1) because she has lived a unique, exciting life and wants to share it; 2) because she still feels young and active and does not want to be relegated to nostalgia; and 3) because she wants to take stock of the past before she faces the future. Photographs included.

Ball, George W. The past has another pattern: memoirs. New York: Norton, 1982.
Memoirs of the man who worked as an Undersecretary of State and acting Secretary. His work with the Department of State began in 1957 and he resigned in 1970. He gives an insider's point of view on the Kennedy years, the Johnson years, the Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam, and Nixon.

Berman, William C. William Fulbright and the Vietnam war: the dissent of a political realist. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1988.
Fulbright was the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and was one of those in Congress who opposed the war in Vietnam. Berman says this book is not a biography, but an attempt to study the how the Vietnam war shaped Fulbright’s philosophy of the United States’s foreign policy.

Bradlee, Ben. A good life: newspapering and other adventures. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995.
Not strictly an autobiography, but a recounting of the “memories of the events that have left their mark on” Bradlee. He writes about being in the Navy during World War II, about his connections and careers with the Washington Post and Newsweek, about John F. Kennedy, Watergate, the Pentagon Papers, and more. Very readable and engaging.

Brinkley, Douglas. Dean Acheson: the cold war years, 1953-1971. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992.
Brinkley focuses on the last 18 years of Acheson’s life, after being Secretary of State. During these years he served as adviser to presidents Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon. Photos included.

Cannon, Lou. Reagan. New York: Putnam, 1982.
A biography of Reagan from a journalist who covered Reagan "since his first campaign for governor" through his presidency as White House correspondent for the Washington Post. Cannon admits that he likes and respects Reagan, while being unsure of his ability to "achieve the results he intends." There is not very much on his younger years, as Cannon is trying to convey Reagan's politics in the contemporary "political arenas" and the sense of the people Reagan brought with him into his presidency.

Chafe, William Henry. Never stop running: Allard Lowenstein and the struggle to save American liberalism. New York: Basic Books, 1993.
Lowenstein was a liberal champion who influenced many of the youth of the sixties. Against, racism and the Vietnam war, he virtually started the movements that countered both. This biography reflects both his public and his private persona.

Clifford, Clark M. Counsel to the president: a memoir. New York: Random House, 1991.
Clifford was an adviser of sorts to every Democratic President since the end of World War II, but became particularly involved with Kennedy and Johnson. He because Secretary of Defense under Johnson and made a transformation from a hawk to a dove about the Vietnam wars. Photos included.

Cohen, Warren I. Dean Rusk. Totowa, NJ: Cooper Square Publishers, 1980.
A biography of Rusk. Rusk read the manuscript to correct any factual errors, but did not collaborate with Cohen otherwise.

Colby, William, and Peter Forbath. Honorable men: my life in the CIA. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1978.
The autobiography of the man who ran the CIA during Nixon’s second term. He served in the CIA from 1962-1975. Photos included.

Dellinger, David. From Yale to jail: the life story of a moral dissenter. New York: Pantheon Books, 1993.
Dellinger's autobiography. He was one of the most famous '60s activists and was one of the Chicago 7.

Edwards, Lee. Goldwater: the man who made a revolution. Washington, DC: Regnery, 1995.
A very unbalanced, pro-Goldwater biography. Edwards claims that “Barry Goldwater laid the foundation for a political revolution and led a generation of conservatives to understand that theirs was a winning as well as a just cause.” Photos included.

Ford, Gerald R. A time to heal: the autobiography of Gerald R. Ford. New York: Harper & Row, 1979.
This narrative begins with Ford learning about the impending damage to Nixon because of the disclosure of the White House tapes, and the decisions that were made thereafter for Nixon to resign, Ford to take over, and Nixon to be pardoned by Ford. Ford then backtracks from his childhood through his political life and ends with the election of Jimmy Carter, and Ford’s defeat. Photos included.

Goldberg, Robert Alan. Barry Goldwater. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1995.
A very sympathetic analysis of the life of this very conservative statesman. Photos included.

Goldwater, Barry M., and Jack Casserly. Goldwater. New York: Doubleday, 1988.
Goldwater was one of the most conservative politicians of his time. He ran for president in 1964 and lost to Johnson. Photos included.

Goodwin, Doris Kearns. The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1987.
A history of the family of John, Robert, Teddy, and all the other Kennedy children. Goodwin later admitted to plagiarizing significant parts of this book. Photos included.

Grogan, Emmett. Ringolevio: a life played for keeps. Boston: Little, Brown, 1972.
Grogan was the main force behind the Diggers, a loosely-organized group who provided free food and other goods to the hippies of the Haight-Ashbury in San Francisco. This is his autobiography, though it is hard to tell what is fact and what is fiction.

Hamilton, Charles V. Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.: the political biography of an American dilemma. New York: Atheneum, 1991.
Powell, a black man, was elected to the Congress in 1944. He was a pastor who used his church in Harlem as a “command post” for his civil rights protest and political activity. His political life spanned the decades of the 1930s, ‘40s, ‘50s, and ‘60s and this is the biography of that political life, one which was controversially confrontative about racial issues.

Harris, David. Dreams die hard. New York: St. Martin's, 1982.
A memoir of three activists' experiences of the sixties: Allard Lowenstein, Dennis Sweeney, and the author. Lowenstein began the "dump Johnson" movement and was a fairly famous social change agent. Sweeney, one of Lowenstein's students and converts, shot Lowenstein to death in 1980.

Hayden, Tom. Reunion: a memoir. New York: Random House, 1988.
Tom Hayden, one of the most famous leaders of SDS, Jane Fonda's former husband, California politician, here records his autobiography. Includes photos.

Hoffman, Abbie. Soon to be a major motion picture. New York: Putnam, 1980.
An autobiography written while Hoffman was still underground. Focuses mainly on his sixties activities. Does describe his early manic- depressive experience which started while he was in hiding.

Horne, Alistair. Macmillan. London: Macmillan, 1989.
A two-volume biography of one of the most influential British statesmen in the twentieth century. Photos included.

Humphrey, Hubert H. The education of a public man: my life and politics. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1976.
An autobiography of the man who was Vice-President under Lyndon Johnson, and who ran against Nixon in 1968. Humphrey claims that this is an “honest” account, not meant to be self-serving as reconstruction of history and his part in it. Reviewers call it highly readable and fairly accurate.

Isaacson, Walter. Kissinger: a biography. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992.
A readable biography of Kissinger. This is not an authorized biography, but Isaacson did interview Kissinger on many occasions. In addition, the book is thoroughly research and insightful.

__________, and Evan Thomas. The wise men: six friends and the world they made: Acheson, Bohlen, Harriman, Kennan, Lovett, McCloy. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1986.
The “original best and brightest,” Dean Acheson, Charles Bohlen, Averell Harriman, George Kennan, Robert Lovett, and John McCloy were the American statesmen who were responsible for keeping the United States from turning inward after World War II and for committing the nation “to defending freedom wherever it sought to flourish.” Later, they became counselors when the U.S. became stalled in Vietnam.

Jezer, Marty. Abbie Hoffman, American rebel. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1992.
Abbie Hoffman was a most complex man. Co-founder of the Yippies, he was also a deeply committed political activist. He was comical and intense. He was also one of the Chicago Seven. He went underground for several years, where he began more community activism. In 1980 he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and in 1989 he committed suicide. Photos included.

King, Coretta Scott. My life with Martin Luther King, Jr. New York: Holt, Rinehard & Winston, 1969.
Coretta Scott King’s very readable account of her marriage to King. Photos included.

Kissinger, Henry. White House years. Boston: Little, Brown, 1979.
Kissinger's story of his years as security advisor to Nixon and head of the Department of State. He focuses on foreign policy, particularly Vietnam, Russia, China, Europe, and the Middle East. Photographs are included.

__________. Years of upheaval. Boston: Little, Brown, 1982.
This is Kissinger’s account of Nixon’s second term in office, when he was involved in Watergate, the end of the Vietnam war, and other international problems. Photos included.

Kovic, Ron. Born on the fourth of July. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1976.
In the mid-1960s, Kovic joined the Marines and went to Vietnam, where he was wounded and paralyzed. This book is the story of his transformation from a trusting patriot into an active Vietnam Veteran Against the War.

Kramer, Jane. Allen Ginsberg in America. New York: Random House, 1969.
A non-linear biography that places Ginsberg in his milieu throughout the 1950s and 1960s. The reader is placed in situ in many instances, and is treated to both Ginsberg’s and the author’s reflections on his life and the meaning of his work as a beat and a hippie.

Krock, Arthur. Memoirs: sixty years on the firing line. New York: Funk & Wagnalls, 1968.
Krock, a veteran Washington correspondent for the New York Times offers portraits of government leaders he knew, including Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson.


Leary, Timothy. Flashbacks, an autobiography. Los Angeles: J.P. Tarcher, 1983.
The flashbacks are of Leary's younger days before the death of his first wife. Photographs included.

Lesher, Stephan. George Wallace: American populist. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1994.
Wallace cooperated with Lesher in this biography. Lesher’s point of view is that Wallace “became the mainstream, moving national campaign rhetoric . . . sharply to the right for the rest of the twentieth century . . . .” Lesher describes the origins of Wallace’s racism, as well as his political charisma to a large number of Americans.

Malcolm X, with Alex Haley. The autobiography of Malcolm X. London: Penguin, 1965.
Malcolm X was a powerful figure in the black power struggle. He started out as a petty criminal and educated himself, becoming one of the most articulate activists of the civil rights movement. He tells of his conversion to Islam, and his eventual disillusion with the Black Muslims. He was assassinated in 1965.

Miles, Barry. Ginsberg: a biography. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1989.
Ginsberg, one of the most famous poets of this generation, was at the forefront of all the 1960s movements and made friends with the cultural and political youth leaders.

Mills, Kay. This little light of mine: the life of Fannie Lou Hamer. New York: Plume, 1994.
Fanny Lou Hamer was a poor black woman who grew up in rural Mississippi. But in 1962, when the young civil rights workders came to her home town of Ruleville and asked for help with voter registration, 44 year old Hamer raised her hand. From those beginnings, she because one of the leading black civil rights champions in Mississippi and America. Mills tells her powerful story in a readable, engaging manner.


Newfield, Jack. Robert Kennedy: a memoir. New York: Dutton, 1969.
This is not a comprehensive biography of Robert Kennedy; it covers the period from his brother’s assassination to his own assassination in 1968. The author began the book in 1966, and thus includes interviews and firsthand information based on his experiences before Robert Kennedy’s death. Newfield does not claim it as an authorized biography and admits that he own “personal testament” about Kennedy.


Oates, Stephen B. Let the trumpet sound: the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. New York: HarperPerennial, 1992.
A scholarly biography of Martin Luther King.

O'Brien, Lawrence F. No final victories; a life in politics--from John F. Kennedy to Watergate. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1974.
O'Brien was Director of Congressional Relations for Kennedy and Johnson, Postmaster General under Johnson, and twice Democratic National Chairman. It was his office that the Watergate burglers broke into. However, he says he wrote this book, a memoir of those years, to show that politics does not have to be bad.

O'Neill, Tip. Man of the House: the life and political memoirs of Speaker Tip O'Neill. New York: Random House, 1987.
An autobiography of one of the most powerful congressmen of the 1960s. O'Neill served in Congress for 34 years; during the 1690s he opposed the Vietnam war and thus came into conflict with LBJ.

Powers, Richard Gid. Secrecy and power: the life of J. Edgar Hoover. New York: Free Press, 1987.
A biography of the leader of the FBI for 48 years and made it into a criminal investigation unit of mythical power. For the years Hoover was head of the FBI, he WAS the FBI. But he kept his own secrets. Photos included.

Powers, Thomas. Diana: the making of a terrorist. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1971.
A biography of Diana Oughton, one of the Weathermen who was killed when a house used by Weathermen, in New York, was blown up. Because Oughton was so deeply committed to the movement, this is also a story of the Weathermen, the terrorist organization that grew out of SDS in the late sixties.

Raskin, Jonah. For the hell of it: the life and times of Abbie Hoffman. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996.
Drawing from his own relationship with Hoffman, as well as interviews with friends and family, records from the FBI, and public records, Raskin presents a thorough portrait of this American '60s icon.

Reston, James. Deadline: a memoir. New York: Random House, 1991.

Rusk, Dean, Richard Rusk, and Daniel S. Papp. As I saw it. New York: W. W. Norton, 1990.
This book is based on Dean Rusk's memories as told to his son Richard. Rusk was Secretary of State under Kennedy and Johnson and was frequently the target of anti-war protesters because of his hawkish beliefs and policies.

Schlesinger, Arthur M. Robert Kennedy and his times. New York: Ballentine Books, 1978.
A thorough, detailed biography of Robert Kennedy.

Schoenbaum, Thomas J. Waging peace and war: Dean Rusk in the Truman, Kennedy, and Johnson years. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1988.
Schoenbaum benefitted from Dean Rusk's own stories of his life and career, especially during the time he was Secretary of State and wielded so much influence over the events of the 1960s. He also used other interviews, oral records, and the available literature of the period in his writing.

Schulzinger, Robert D. Henry Kissinger: doctor of diplomacy. New York: Columbia University Press, 1989.
This book focuses on Kissinger the foreign diplomat, covering the years 1969 to 1976.

Schumacher, Michael. Dharma lion: a critical biography of Allen Ginsberg. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1992.

Shapley, Deborah. Promise and power: the life and times of Robert McNamara. Boston: Little, Brown, 1993.
A very readable biography of McNamara, who served as Secretary of Defense from 1961 (under Kennedy) to 1968 (under Johnson). It was learned after he left the office that he had gradually become less and less confident of the U.S.'s involvement in Vietnam and its ability to win the war. He had several conflicts with Johnson over war strategy, and some speculate that he was forced to resign in 1968.

Stein, Jean. American journey: the times of Robert Kennedy. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1970.
A biography of RFK put together as an oral history or narrative. The whole book comes from interviews with people on or standing by Kennedy's funeral train.

Wilkins, Roy, with Tom Mathews. Standing fast: the autobiography of Roy Wilkins. New York: Viking Press, 1982.

Woods, Randall Bennett. Fulbright: a biography. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995.
Fulbright was a U.S. congressman and senator from 1943 to the mid-1970s. He was against Kennedy's plans for the Bay of Pigs invation. And, while he pushed for the Tonkin Gulf Resolution, he later led the Congressional movement to get the U.S. out of Vietnam. Woods presents a well-researched biography of the life and times of Fulbright.

Zumwalt, Elmo R., Jr. On watch: a memoir. New York: Quadrangle Books, 1976.
After four years as Chief of Naval Operations, Zumwalt wrote to make public what he found to be deception of the administration (Nixon, Kissinger, and others) about the SALT talks, the Vietnam war, and U.S. military strength and readiness.

Business and Economics

Frank, Thomas. The conquest of cool: business culture, counterculture and the rise of hip consumerism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997.

Moynihan, Daniel Patrick. Maximum feasible misunderstanding: community action in the war on poverty. New York: Free Press, 1969.
This title is based on a definition of "Community Action" as that "which is developed and conducted with the maximum feasible participation of the residents of the areas" involved. Moynihan writes about the Community Action Programs that were a part of Johnson's war on poverty.


Piven, Frances Fox, and Richard A. Cloward. Poor people's movements: why they succeed, how they fail. New York: Pantheon Books, 1977.

Rostow, W.W. The stages of economic growth: a non-communist manifesto. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1971.

Sale, Kirkpatrick, and Eric Foner. The green revolution: the American environmental movement, 1962-1992. New York: Hill & Wang, 1993.
The story of three decades of the environmental movement in the United States, beginning in 1962 and moving through 1990. Sale divides these decades into four periods: 1) From 1962 until the first Earth Day in 1970, when the environment first entered America's consciousness as an issue; 2) the 1970's until the Reagan administration, when reform "guided by a dark new perception of approaching doomsday"; 3) the "Reagan reaction"; and 4) the first Bush administration.

Communes

Fairfield, Richard. Communes USA: a personal tour. Baltimore: Penguin Books, 1971.
An historical survey of communes and a description of many that existed in the 1960s, divided into the following groups: ideological, religious, hip, group marriage, service, and youth. Photos included.

Melville, Keith. Communes in the counter culture; origins, theories, styles of life. New York: Morrow, 1972.
A description, analysis and history of the commune movement in general and in the U.S. during the 1960s. “To dismiss those who retreat to communes . . . as “drop-outs” running away from the problems of the real work is to miss the fact that valuable ideas are being tested in the communes.” Some of the ideas discussed are collectivism, simplification of life, and the search for alternative realities. Very readable.


Counterculture

McNeill, Don. Moving through here. New York: Knopf, 1970.
A collection of Don McNeill’s articles from the Village Voice from the spring of 1967 to the spring of 1968. This is a picture of the “Summer of Love” era in New York City. An interesting chronicle of that year.


Perry, Paul. On the bus: the complete guide to the legendary trip of Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters and the birth of the counterculture. New York: Thunder's Mouth Press, 1990.
Using interviews, various written pieces, and photos, Perry has given a history of this countercultural phenomenon of 1964, the bus trip that many believe was the beginning of the whole 1960's countercultural movement.

Rubin, Jerry. Do it! Scenarios of the revolution. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1970.
One of the most famous spokesmen for 1960s male youth, Jerry Rubin calls on American youth to create a new world very different from their parents. Filled with graphics and photos, this was one of the books for youth to at least know about.

__________. We are everywhere. New York: Harper & Row, 1971.

Yablonsky, Lewis. The hippie trip. New York: Pegasus, 1968.
A first-hand account of the "hippie panorama" by a prominent sociologist. Includes interviews and analysis.

Crime

Brownmiller, Susan. Against our will: men, women and rape. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1975.
A groundbreaking work exploring the history of rape and the cultural causes of this crime throughout history. Brownmiller ends by saying that "the threat, use and cultural acceptance of sexual force is a pervasive process of intimidation that affects all women."

Button, James W. Black violence: political impact of the 1960s riots. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1978.
A study of the urban riots of 1967-68 to explore how the government responded to those riots. As such, it also examines “the utility of collective violence as a strategy of change for dispossessed minorities.”


Churchill, Ward, and Jim Vander Wall. The COINTELPRO papers: documents from the FBI's secret wars against domestic dissent. Boston: South End Press, 1990.
FBI documents that speak to campaigns against the American Indian Movement and attacks on Marcus Garvey and Alger Hiss. Most are from the counterintelligence programs of the FBI (COINTELPRO) which served to “disrupt, discredit, or otherwise neutralize” various movements of the 16960s including the civil rights movement, Puerto Rican independence, antiwar and student movements.


Gilbert, James Burkhart. A cycle of outrage: America's reaction to the juvenile delinquent in the 1950s. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.
Gilbert’s book explores the power of mass media, specifically films, to deprive “adolescents of their innocence, their childhood and their independence.” His focus is on the ability of mass culture to create juvenile delinquency.


Sullivan, William C. The Bureau: my thirty years in Hoover's FBI. New York: Norton, 1979.
Sullivan, who served in the Intelligence Division of the FBI, often disagreed with Hoover, considering him too interested in public relations and lacking in judgment. Hoover forced him out of the Bureau in 1971, but Sullivan wanted to write a book that would give the public a true story of what went on in Hoover’s FBI.

Diplomatic History

Billings-Yun, Melanie. Decision against war: Eisenhower and Dien Bien Phu, 1954. New York: Columbia University Press, 1988.

Blair, Anne E. Lodge in Vietnam: a patriot abroad. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995.

Chomsky, Noam. American power and the new mandarins. New York: Random House/Pantheon Books, 1969.
Chomsky was a strong opponent of America's involvement in Vietnam. In these essays, he is critical of the role American intellectuals have played in their relationships to the war.

Ellsburg, Daniel. Papers on the war. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1972.
An attempt to help the public understand the foreign policy and bureaucratic issues that kept the United States involved in the Vietnam war in the face of all the resistance to it.

Fulbright, J. William. The arrogance of power. New York: Random House, 1966.

Gaddis, John Lewis. Strategies of containment: a critical appraisal of postwar American national security policy. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982.

Gardner, Lloyd C. Approaching Vietnam: from World War II through Dienbienphu, 1941-1954. New York: Norton, 1988.
Gardner claims that much is missing in the history of how the U.S. became involved in Vietnam from the beginning in 1941. He claims that this is not a book about the politics of Vietnam, but about how American politicians perceived the position of Vietnam in global politics. It also is not about the French involvement in Vietnam, but America’s perception of that involvement. Gardner claims to place the U.S. involvement in Vietnam within the themes of the Cold War, the U.S.’s strategies for balance between communism and democracy in the world.


Garthoff, Raymond L. Detente and confrontation: American-Soviet relations from Nixon to Reagan. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 1985.

Gelb, Leslie, with Richard Betts. The irony of Vietnam: the system worked. Washington: Brookings Institution, 1979.
An investigation into the decision-making that went on during the Vietnam war. It is the author's contention that, although the policies failed, the "domestic decisionmaking system" worked.

Guthman, Edwin O. We band of brothers. New York: Harper & Row, 1971.
The author says he is writing of his experiences with Robert Kennedy from 1956 until his death. He argues that Kennedy did not experience a great transformation in his later years--that he was always as full of concern for his country and its people with regard to the Vietnam war and civil rights.

Johnson, U. Alexis. The right hand of power. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1984.

Kattenburg, Paul. The Vietnam trauma in American foreign policy, 1945-75. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Books, 1980.

Kazin, Michael. The populist persuasion: an American history. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1998.

Kennedy, Robert F. To seek a newer world. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1967.
Speeches and writings from Kennedy while in the Senate from 1965 on. Subjects include youth, the urban crisis, the Alliance for Progress, nuclear control, and Vietnam.

Kissinger, Henry. Diplomacy. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1994.

Nolting, Frederick. From trust to tragedy: the political memoirs of Frederick Nolting, Kennedy's ambassador to Diem's Vietnam. New York: Praeger, 1988.

Patti, Archimedes L.A. Why Vietnam?: prelude to America's albatross. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980.

Schlesinger, Arthur M., Jr. The bitter heritage: Vietnam and American democracy, 1941-1966. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1966.
An early essay on the problems of U.S. involvement in Vietnam. A well-wrought rhetorical argument for the U.S. to take a middle ground--not to increase bombing or to summarily withdraw all troops, but to hold firm until peace could be negotiated.

United States. Department of State. Foreign relations of the United States, 1951. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1980.

__________. Foreign relations of the United States, 1958-1963. Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1992.

__________. Foreign relations of the United States, 1961-1963. Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1992.

__________. Foreign relations of the United States, 1964-1968. Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1992.

Wyden, Peter. The Bay of Pigs: the untold story. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1979.

Drugs

Hollingshead, Michael. The man who turned on the world. New York: Abelard-Schuman, 1974.
Michael Hollingshead began taking LSD in 1960, before it was illegal. This book is a narrative of his ten- year odyssey through the 1960s, constantly using LSD and trying to communicate with others who were on their own trips to spiritual enlightenment.

Leary, Timothy. The politics of ecstasy. London: Paladin, 1970.
An exploration of LSD and its effects on the lives of those who took it and those who didn't. A collection of essays written between 1963-1967.

Lee, Martin A. Acid dreams: the CIA, LSD, and the sixties rebellion. New York: Grove Press, 1985.
A detailed history of LSD. Lee starts with its discovery in 1938, takes the reader through the government's testing of it as a "truth serum" and its testing by psychologists as a simulation of or cure for psychosis, and then through its use and effects in the 1960s.

, Jay. Storming heaven: LSD and the American dream. New York: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1987.
An account of the psychedelic movement in America starting with the discovery of LSD in 1943 and ending in 1983. A very readable book that covers all the people and events tied to this movement.

Wolfe, Tom. The electric kool-aid acid test. New York: Bantam Books, 1968.
An account of Ken Kesey's famous Merry Pranksters, told by the father of New Journalism.

Education

Avorn, Jerry L. Up against the ivy wall: a history of the Columbia crisis. New York: Atheneum Press, 1968.
An account of the student revolt at Columbia in April and May of 1968. This was one of the most famous student revolts of the decade and the coverage is based on interviews with the people involved. The fact that this was written so soon after the events described gives the account a special perspective.

Cohen, Robert. When the old left was young: student radicals and America's first mass student movement, 1929-1941. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.

Evans, M. Stanton. Revolt on the campus. Chicago: H. Regnery, 1961.

Feuer, Lewis S. The conflict of generations: the character and significance of student movements. New York: Basic Books, 1969.
A history of student movements. As a sociologist, Feuer describes the common traits of the student activists and he outlines the stages of such movements. Although he claims all student movements have been similar, he does focus on a few, e.g., the New Student Left and the Berkeley uprising in 1964-1966.

Flacks, Richard. Youth and social change. Chicago: Markham Publishing Co., 1971.
An account of the transformation of college campuses of the 1950s to the political centers of activity of the 1960s. Although the writer is sympathetic to the radical student movement, he claims the book is based on thorough research. Flacks was a graduate student at the University of Michigan at the beginning of the 1960s and was a member of SDS from its first days.

Heirich, Max. The beginning: Berkeley, 1964. New York: Columbia University Press, 1971.
Using the Berkeley Free Speech Movement uprisings in 1964 as a model, Heirich analyzes collective action in a conflict setting. Photos included.

Kunen, James S. The strawberry statement: notes of a college revolutionary. New York: Random House, 1969.
A diary of Columbia University in the summer of 1967 by one of its activist students.

Levitt, Cyril. Children of privilege: student revolt in the sixties: a study of student movements in Canada, the United States, and West Germany. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1984.
Levitt looks specifically at the New Left in these countries. He sees these movements having not so much of a basis in Communism as in the material conditions of the students and their ideologies.

Lipset, Seymour Martin, and Sheldon S. Wolin, eds. The Berkeley student revolt: facts and interpretations. Garden City, NY: Anchor Books, 1965.
Essays about the 1964 uprising at Berkeley and the Free Speech Movement. Writers include Lipset, Clark Kerr, Mario Savio, Jack Weinberg, Nathan Glazer, Paul Goodman, and many others.

McGill, William J. The year of the monkey: revolt on campus, 1968-69. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1982.
A view of campus unrest at the University of California-San Diego in 1969, told from the perspective of the man who was chancellor of the University. We get a view of Angela Davis, Eldridge Cleaver, and Herbert Marcuse, as well as the impact of the People's Park riots in Berkeley on the UCSD campus administration.

Menashe, Louis, and Ronald Radosh, eds. Teach-ins, U.S.A.; reports, opinions, documents. New York: F.A. Praeger, 1967.
An exploration of the teach-in movement, which began in the early sixties as a way for faculty and students to learn more about important issues and to communicate with each other less formally.

Orrick, William H., Jr. Shut it down! A college in crisis: San Francisco State College, October 1968 - April, 1969; a report to the National Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1969.

Rorabaugh, W.J. Berkeley at war: the 1960s. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.
A history of the sixties in Berkeley, one of the university centers of upheaval, beginning with the Free Speech Movement in 1964. Includes photos and a glossary of organizations.

Rothman, Stanley, and S. Robert Lichter. Roots of radicalism: Jews, Christians, and the new left. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982.
A study of why Jewish youth played such a large role in the American student new left.

Sale, Kirkpatrick. SDS. New York: Random House, 1973.
The most quoted and referred to history of SDS. Sale looks at SDS organizations, and the officers, as well as printing the SDS constitution and giving a brief history of SDS's roots.

Unger, Irwin, and Debi Unger. The movement: a history of the American new left, 1959-1972. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1974.
The Ungers define what they mean by the new left, and then they trace its history from 1960-1972, when, to them, it ceased to exist. They also distinguish the new left from leftist movements before and after this time period.

United States. President's Commission on Campus Unrest. Report of the President's Commission on Campus Unrest. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1970.

Wallerstein, Immanuel Maurice, and Paul Starr. The university crisis reader. New York: Random House, 1971.
Documents from debates at Columbia University in the late 1960s on the crisis in the university. Coverage includes the business aspects of the university, its relationship with government, racism in the university, university governance, changes in education, SDS and the left, faculty roles, and student movements.

Whalen, Jack, and Richard Flacks. Beyond the barricades: the sixties generation grows up. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1989.
The authors have identified a group of 1960s activists and analyzed how their youth affected their adult lives. Their conclusions are that 1960s activists did not follow the paths of normal adult lives and that those 1960s activists are still being affected by their idealism.

Wilkinson, J. Harvie, III. From Brown to Bakke: the Supreme Court and school integration, 1954-1978. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979.

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Ambrose, Stephen E. Eisenhower, the President. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1984.

Anderson, David L. Trapped by success: the Eisenhower administration and Vietnam, 1953-1961. New York: Columbia University Press, 1991.

Eisenhower, Dwight D. Mandate for change, 1953-1956: the White House years. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1963.


___________. Waging peace, 1956-1961: the White House years. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1965.

Public papers of the presidents. Dwight D. Eisenhower. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1960.

Fiction and Poetry

Bao Ninh. The sorrow of war: a novel of North Vietnam. New York: Pantheon Books, 1993.

Burroughs, William. Naked lunch. New York: Grove Press, 1959.

Ehrhart, W.D. Carrying the darkness: the poetry of the Vietnam war. Lubbock: Texas Tech University Press, 1985.

Ginsberg, Allen. Howl, and other poems. San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1956.

Kerouac, Jack. On the road. New York: Penguin Books, 1959.

Lederer, William J., and Eugene Burdick. The ugly American. New York: Norton, 1958.

Mailer, Norman. Armies of the night: history as novel, the novel as history. New York: New American Library, 1968.
A New Journalistic account of the 1967 march on the Pentagon from the point of view of the author, who was arrested in the march.

O'Brien, Tim. Going after Cacciato: a novel. New York: Delacorte Press, 1978.
In this surrealistic novel, a soldier in Vietnam decides to stop fighting and go from Indochina to Paris.

__________. The things they carried: a work of fiction. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1990.
Considered one of the great works of fiction about Vietnam, this is a collection of stories based on what soldiers carried with them during the war.

Gays and Lesbians

D'Emilio, John. Sexual politics, sexual communities: the making of a homosexual minority in the United States, 1940-1970. Chicago: Unversity of Chicago Press, 1998.

Duberman, Martin. Stonewall. New York: Plume, 1994.

General

Acheson, Dean. Present at the creation: my years in the State Department. New York: Norton, 1969.

Bell, Daniel. The cultural contradictions of capitalism. New York: Basic Books, 1976.
A theoretical analysis of society based on the author's division of contemporary society into three parts: 1) the techno- economic structure; 2) the polity; and 3) the culture. This book is indicative of the philosophical beliefs held by many of the intelligentsia of the 1960s. Bell refers to Marx, Nietzsche, Conrad, Paz, Weber, Arendt, Roszak, Marcuse, and other writers who were popular among students in the 1960s.

Bloom, Alexander, and Wini Breines, eds. "Takin' it to the streets": a sixties reader. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.

Bloom, Allan. The closing of the American mind. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1987.

Burner, David. Making peace with the 60s. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1996.

Capps, Walter H. The unfinished war: Vietnam and the American conscience. Boston: Beacon Press, 1982.
Capps ties the experience of the Vietnam war to the "revitalization of conservative religion" and the "new spirituality."

Carroll, Peter N. It seemed like nothing happened: the tragedy and promise of American in the 1970s. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1982.

Dickstein, Morris. Gates of Eden: American culture in the sixties. New York: Basic Books, 1977.
Dickstein has written a very important cultural history and criticism of the sixties. The author says that the book is not political, and yet it was hard to separate culture from politics at the time, and Dickstein also points to parallels. He uses the arts--music, poetry, fiction, and nonfiction-- to make his history.

Didion, Joan. Slouching towards Bethleham. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1979.
Pieces written 1965-1967 on a myriad of topics--a wife murdering her husband, John Wayne, a school for nonviolence run by Joan Baez, Communist Michael Laski, Howard Hughes, the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, Las Vegas weddings, the Haight, self respect, Hollywood, morality, families, East Coast/West Coast, Hawaii, Alcatraz, Newport, RI, Mexico, Los Angeles, and New York. Taken together, these pieces present a microcosm of American culture in the 1960s.

Engelhardt, Tom. The end of victory culture: cold war America and the disillusioning of a generation. New York: Basic Books, 1995.

Farber, David. The age of great dreams: from memory to history. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1994.

Galbraith, John Kenneth. The affluent society. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1976.

Gibson, James William. Warrior dreams: paramilitary culture in post-Vietnam America. New York: Hill and Wang, 1994.

Gitlin, Todd. The twilight of common dreams: why America is wracked by culture wars. New York: Metropolitan Books, 1995.

Goldman, Eric Frederick. The tragedy of Lyndon Johnson. New York: Knopf, 1969.
An account of Johnson's years in the White House. According to Goldman, Johnson was the classic tragic figure, "the strong man overwhelmed by forces, from within and without."

Goodman, Mitchell, comp. The movement toward a new America: the beginnings of a long revolution; (a collage) . . . a what? Philadelphia: Pilgrim Press, 1970.
A handbook for activists including a history of movements, biographical information about people involved in them, and models of what to do and how to do it.

Halberstam, David. The fifties. New York: Villard Books, 1993.
A panoramic overview of the ten years that led to the turbulent sixties. Halberstam covers McCarthy, the young Martin Luther King, the Korean War, Levittown, Jack Kerouac, Elvis Presley, McDonalds, the beginning of Holiday Inns, Francis Gary Powers, the Pill, television, and much, much more.

Hobsbawm, Eric. Age of extremes: the short twentieth century, 1914-1991. London: Michael Joseph, 1994.

Jamison, Andrew, and Ron Eyerman. Seeds of the sixties. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994.

Krassner, Paul. Confessions of a raving, unconfined nut: misadventures in the counter-culture. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993.

Isserman, Maurice, and Michael Kazin. America divided: the civil war of the 1960s. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000.

Manchester, William. The glory and the dream: a narrative history of America, 1932-1972. Boston: Little, Brown, 1974.
This is a fascinating history which, in the sections on the sixties, covers JFK/LBJ, Spock, Nader, and Nixon, as well as the events of the period. Very comprehensive.

Marwick, Arthur. The sixties: cultural revolution in Britain, France, Italy, and the United States, c. 1958 - c. 1974. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

May, Larry, ed. Recasting America: culture and politics in the age of cold war. Chicago: University of Chicago, 1989.

Mills, C. Wright. The power elite. New York: Oxford University Press, 1956.

__________. Power, politics, and people: the collected essays of C. Wright Mills. Edited by Irving Louis Horowitz. New York: Oxford University Press, 1963.

Morgan, Edward P. The sixties experience: hard lessons about modern America. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1991.

Nixon, Richard M. Six crises. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1962.

O'Brien, Geoffrey. Dream time: chapters from the sixties. New York: Viking, 1988.
An interior view of the 1960s, told as more of a dreamscape from one person's inner view of the era than as an analytical history of the period.

Obst, Lynda Rosen. The sixties: the decade remembered now, by the people who lived it then. San Francisco: Rolling Stone Press, 1976.
A year-by-year grouping of essays and photographs of individual aspects--people, movements, events--of the sixties. Each year begins with a calendar of events for that particular year.

O'Neill, William L. Coming apart: an informal history of America in the 1960's. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1971.
Maybe informal, but certainly comprehensive. Covers all aspects of the 1960s, including Ralph Nader, space exploration, sports, Hell's Angels, religion, and organized medicine. One of the first histories written. Unfortunately, it ended before the events of 1970 and Watergate.

Patterson, James T. Grand expectations: the United States, 1945-1974. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Sayres, Sohnya, et al. The 60's without apology. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1984.
A collection of essays, some very philosophical, on movements of the 1960s, both in the U.S. and internationally.

Slotkin, Richard. Gunfighter nation: the myth of the frontier in twentieth-century America. New York: Atheneum, 1992.

Steigerwald, David. The sixties and the end of modern America. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995.

Tischler, Barbara L., ed. Sights on the sixties. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1992.
A collection of essays on the sixties, covering campus protest, the counterculture, the arts, the women's movement, and the New Left.

Whitfield, Stephen J. The culture of the cold war. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991.

Lyndon Johnson

Barrett, David M. Uncertain warriors: Lyndon Johnson and his Vietnam advisors. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1993.

Bernstein, Irving. Guns or butter: the presidency of Lyndon Johnson. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Beschloss, Michael R., ed. Taking charge: the Johnson White House tapes, 1963-1964. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997.

Bornet, Vaughn Davis. The presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1983.

Califano, Joseph A., Jr. The triumph and tragedy of Lyndon Johnson: the White House years. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1991.

Caro, Robert A. The years of Lyndon Johnson. New York: Knopf, 1982-2002.

Chester, Lewis, Godfrey Hodgson, and Bruce Page. An American melodrama: the presidential campaign of 1968. New York: Viking Press, 1969.
A comprehensive account of the campaign which, like many other 1968 happenings, was one of the most exciting in American history.

Cohen, Warren I., and Nancy Bernkopf Tucker, eds. Lyndon Johnson confronts the world: American foreign policy, 1963-1968. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

Conkin, Paul K. Big daddy from the Pedernales: Lyndon Baines Johnson. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1986.
A scholarly biography. Conkin sees Johnson as a complex person, neither good nor bad. He also sees him as somewhat out of his times--a throwback to frontier America.

Dallek, Robert. Flawed giant: Lyndon Johnson and his times, 1961-1973. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

Divine, Robert A., ed. Exploring the Johnson years. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1981.

Gardner, Lloyd C. Pay any price: Lyndon Johnson and the wars for Vietnam. Chicago: I.R. Dee, 1995.

Geyelin, Philip. Lyndon B. Johnson and the world. New York: F.A. Praeger, 1966.
An examination of how Johnson approached foreign affairs and foreign policy.

Gittinger, Ted, ed. The Johnson years: a Vietnam roundtable. Austin: Lyndon Baines Johnson Library, 1993.

Graff, Henry F. Tuesday cabinet: deliberation and decision on peace and war under Lyndon B. Johnson. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1970.
On Tuesdays, Johnson's chief advisors gathered together for lunch and discussion, mostly about the Vietnam war. These meetings proved to be very important in policy-making about the war. Included at the meetings were Dean Rusk, Robert McNamara, McGeorge Bundy, Bill Moyers, and Richard Helms.

Johnson, Lady Bird. A White House diary. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1970.

Johnson, Lyndon B. The vantage point: perspectives of the presidency, 1963-1969. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1971.
Johnson's own story of his presidency. Photographs included.

Kearns, Doris. Lyndon Johnson and the American dream. New York: Harper & Row, 1976.
A biography and examination of the ways Johnson's private and public selves interacted.

McCarthy, Eugene J. The year of the people. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1969.

McPherson, Harry. A political education. Boston: Little, Brown, 1972.

Miller, Merle. Lyndon, an oral biography. New York: Putnam, 1980.

Public papers of the presidents. Lyndon B. Johnson. Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1965.

Reedy, George. Lyndon B. Johnson, a memoir. New York: Andrews and Michael, 1982.

Shesol, Jeff. Mutual contempt: Lyndon Johnson, Robert Kennedy, and the feud that defined a decade. New York: W.W. Norton, 1997.

Sidey, Hugh. A very personal presidency: Lyndon Johnson in the White House. New York: Atheneum, 1968.

VanDeMark, Brian. Into the quagmire: Lyndon Johnson and the escalation of the Vietnam war. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.
An analysis of LBJ's decisions to escalate the war in Vietnam, November, 1964 - July, 1965.

Valenti, Jack. A very human president. New York: Norton, 1975.
Valenti was a friend of Johnson's for many years and was a member of his White House staff. These are his memoirs of Johnson, beginning with Johnson's first day as president.

White, Theodore. The making of the President, 1964. New York: NAL-Signet Books, 1964.
White reports on the presidential campaigns of 1964--from the death of Kennedy and Johnson's succession, through the primaries, the conventions, and the election. Throughout this election year were heard the sounds of the civil rights revolution and rioting in the streets.

John F. Kennedy

Allison, Graham T. Essence of decision: explaining the Cuban Missile Crisis. New York: Harper Collins, 1971.
A theoretical analysis and investigation of the Cuban Missile Crisis as a case study on United States foreign policy. The author was from Harvard University and the book represents his work with primary and secondary sources and interviews.

Bernstein, Irving. Promises kept: John F. Kennedy's new frontier. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.
Bernstein argues that Kennedy, had he lived, would have been a very successful president, at least with regard to domestic issues.

Beschloss, Michael R. The crisis years: Kennedy and Khrushchev, 1960-1963. New York: Edward Burlingame Books, 1991.

Blight, James G., Bruce J. Allyn, and David A. Welch. Cuba on the brink: Castro, the missile crisis, and the Soviet collapse. New York: Pantheon Books, 1993.

Bradlee, Benjamin C. Conversations with Kennedy. New York: Norton, 1975.

Brauer, Carl M. John F. Kennedy and the second reconstruction. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977.
The author compares the early 1960s to the Reconstruction period after the Civil War. In many ways the two eras differed, but they were alike in that in both periods there was movement to give black Americans their rights as citizens and as people. This book examines John F. Kennedy's role in this second reconstruction.

Brown, Thomas. JFK, history of an image. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1988.

Collier, Peter, and David Horowitz. The Kennedys: an American drama. New York: Summit Books, 1984.
A chronicle of the entire Kennedy family, beginning with Joe and Rose and ending with the death of David Kennedy (son of Robert) in 1984.

Fairlie, Henry. The Kennedy promise: the politics of expectation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1973.
Fairlie argues that the energy of the Kennedy men was bad for the nation, and that they created expectations for the presidency that could not be met.

Farber, David, ed. The sixties: from memory to history. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1994.

Farber, David, and Eric Foner. The age of great dreams: America in the 1960s. New York: Hill & Wang, 1994.

Fursenko, A.V. "One hell of a gamble": Khrushchev, Castro, and Kennedy, 1958-64. New York: W.W. Norton, 1997.

Giglio, James N. The presidency of John F. Kennedy. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1991.

Goodwin, Richard N. Remembering America: a voice from the sixties. New York: Harper & Row, 1988.
Memoirs of the man who served under Kennedy as special council, under Johnson, and who worked for the campaigns of Robert Kennedy and Eugene McCarthy. He says this book is an exhortation to bring back the spirit of the 1960s.

Guthman, Edwin O., and Jeffrey Shulman, eds. Robert Kennedy in his own words: the unpublished recollections of the Kennedy years. New York: Bantam, 1988.

Halberstam, David. The best and the brightest. New York: Penguin Books, 1972.
An account of the people in power--Kennedy, McNamara, Bundy, Rusk, Johnson--and the way they led us into the Vietnam war and its resulting dissent in the U.S.

Hersh, Seymour M. The dark side of Camelot. Boston: Little, Brown, 1997.

Hilsman, Roger. To move a nation: the politics of foreign policy in the administration of John F. Kennedy. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1967.
An examination, based on case studies, of foreign policy decisions regarding the Bay of Pigs, Cuba, the Congo, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Vietnam. Hilsman was Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs, so this book could be considered a memoir of his experiences.

Kennedy, Robert F. Thirteen days: a memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis. New York: W. W. Norton, 1969.
Robert Kennedy's account of the Cuban Missile Crisis. Photos included.

Kern, Montague, Patricia W. Levering, and Ralph B. Levering. The Kennedy crises: the press, the presidency, and foreign policy. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1983.

Manchester, William. The death of a president: November 20 - November 25, 1963. New York: Harper & Row, 1967.
Jackie Kennedy commissioned Manchester to write this book. In it, he recounts in minute detail the events of those six days in Dallas, the White House, and the government in Washington.

Matusow, Allen J. The unraveling of America: a history of liberalism in the 1960s. New York: Harper & Row, 1984.
A lengthy assessment of the liberal years, the Kennedy-Johnson years in the U.S. Matusow looks at domestic programs, like the War on Poverty, and finds that on the whole these years failed to significantly enrich the lives of the people of the U.S.

May, Ernest R., and Philip D. Zelikow. The Kennedy tapes: inside the White House during the Cuban missile crisis. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 1997.

Morrison, Joan, and Robert K. Morrison. From Camelot to Kent State: the sixties experience in the words of those who lived it. New York: Times Books, 1987.
Interviews with over 55 people who lived or were growing up in the 1960s and in some way participated in the activities. Included are interviews with William Sloan Coffin, Philip Berrigan, Elizabeth McAlister, Jack Weinberg, Jerry Rubin, Abbie Hoffman, Carl Oglesby, Eldridge Cleaver, Jeff Jones and Bill Ayres.

Navasky, Victor S. Kennedy justice. New York: Atheneum, 1971.

O'Donnell, Kenneth P., and David J. Powers. "Johnny, we hardly knew ye": memories of John Fitzgerald Kennedy. Boston: Little, Brown, 1972.

Parmet, Herbert S. Jack: the struggles of John F. Kennedy. New York: Dial Press, 1980.

__________. JFK: the presidency of John F. Kennedy. New York: Dial Press, 1983.
Kennedy's political life beginning with his presidential nomination in 1960 and moving through his campaign and presidency.

Paterson, Thomas G. Kennedy's quest for victory: American foreign policy, 1961-1963. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.

Posner, Gerald L. Case closed: Lee Harvey Oswald and the assassination of JFK. New York: Random House, 1993.

Public papers of the presidents of the United States. John F. Kennedy. Washington: U.S.G.P.O. 1962.

Reeves, Richard. President Kennedy: profile of power. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993.

Reeves, Thomas C. A question of character: a life of John F. Kennedy. New York: Free Press, 1991.
Reeves claims to have researched Kennedy's life to try to find the truth about whether or not Kennedy was the hero or the immoral cheat. His conclusion is that Kennedy's life was more gray than simply black and white, and that Americans should be ready to accept the truth.

Salinger, Pierre. With Kennedy. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1966.
Salinger was Kennedy's press secretary while he was president. This book is Salinger's memoirs of his history with JFK. Photos included.

Schlesinger, Arthur M. A thousand days: John F. Kennedy in the White House. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1965.

Sorenson, Theodore C. Kennedy. New York: Harper & Row, 1965.
Sorenson was a friend of Kennedy's, as well as his Special Counsel. This is his story of Kennedy's presidency. The sources were primarily Sorenson's own files and recollections.

__________. The Kennedy legacy. New York: Macmillan, 1969.
A description of John and Robert Kennedy's public lives and an argument for their importance in American history.

Walton, Richard J. Cold war and counterrevolution: the foreign policy of John F. Kennedy. New York: Viking Press, 1972.

White, Theodore. The making of the President, 1960. New York: Atheneum Publishers, 1960.

Wicker, Tom. JFK and LBJ: the influence of personality on politics. Chicago: I.R. Dee, 1973.
A comparison and analysis of the presidencies of both men. It is Wicker's theory that the escalation of the Vietnam war was an inevitable result of Johnson's succession.

Wofford, Harris. Of Kennedys and Kings: making sense of the sixties. New York: Farrar, Straus, & Giroux, 1980.
Wofford worked closely with Sargent Shriver in the inception of the Peace Corps. He also worked with John Kennedy and Martin Luther King in the civil rights movement. Finally, he was dedicated to Robert Kennedy, concluding that he would have made a better president than his brother Jack. This book is a professional and personal memoir of Wofford's work with Shriver, King, and the Kennedys.

Literature

Jameson, Fredric. Postmodernism, or, the cultural logic of late capitalism. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1991.

Lyotard, Jean-Francois. The postmodern condition: a report on knowledge. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1984.

Slotkin, Richard. Regeneration through violence: the mythology of the American frontier, 1600-1860. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1973.

Searle, William J., ed. Search and clear: critical responses to selected literature and films of the Vietnam war. Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1988.

Sontag, Susan. Against interpretation and other essays. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1966.
A prime example of criticism of literature, film, plays, and the arts culture in general in the 1960s.

Watson, Steven. The birth of the beat generation: visionaries, rebels and hipsters, 1944-1960. New York: Pantheon Books, 1995.

Local History

Buhle, Paul, ed. History and the new left: Madison, Wisconsin, 1950-1970. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1990.

Carter, Dan T. The politics of rage: George Wallace, the origins of the new conservatism, and the transformation of American politics. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995.

Chafe, William. Civilities and civil rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the black struggle for freedom. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980.

Coyote, Peter. Sleeping where I fall: a chronicle. Washington, DC: Counterpoint, 1998.

Fine, Sidney. Violence in the model city: the Cavanagh administration, race relations, and the Detroit riot of 1967. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1989.

Horne, Gerald. Fire this time: the Watts uprising and the 1960s. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1995.

Perry, Charles. The Haight-Ashbury, a history. New York: Random House, 1984.
A history and interpretation of this hippie haven from 1965-1967.

 

Sugrue, Thomas J. The origins of the urban crisis: race and inequality in postwar Detroit. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1996.

Major Influential History

Barthes, Roland. Mythologies. Paris: Editions du Seuil, 1957.

Marcuse, Herbert. Eros and civilization: a philosophical inquiry into Freud. Boston: Beacon Press, 1955.

__________. An essay on liberation. Boston: Beacon Press, 1969.
Marcuse believed that advanced technology could end any physical blocks to utopian society. But society cannot improve until it changes drastically so that the world can host an environment of liberation. The establishment, he felt, was oppressive.

__________. One dimensional man: studies in the ideology of advanced industrial society. Boston: Beacon Press, 1964.
An analysis of advanced technological societies which suppress individuality and encourage the growth of the societal corporation. Though man may be becoming free from want, he may be losing his autonomy.

Wolff, Robert Paul, Barrington Moore, Jr., and Herbert Marcuse. A critique of pure tolerance. Boston: Beacon Press, 1965.

Marriage and the Family

Coontz, Stephanie. The way we never were: American families and the nostalgia trap. New York: Basic Books, 1992.

May, Elaine Tyler. Homeward bound: American families in the cold war era. New York: Basic Books, 1988.

Mass Media

Gitlin, Todd. The whole world is watching: mass media in the making and unmaking of the new left. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1980.
The relationship of the mass media to the new left in the 1960s. Gitlin feels mass media both hurt and helped the various movements.

Hallin, Daniel C. The "uncensored war': the media and Vietnam. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.
Hallin studies television and New York Times coverage of the Vietnam war and concludes that 1) the U.S. press was not consistently anti-U.S. policy, and 2) the U.S. press did not significantly affect public opinion towards the war.

Learner, Laurence. The paper revolutionaries: the rise of the underground press. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1972.
Learner says that the underground press was the one unifying institution produced by the counterculture. He traces the development of the underground press as a part of the "radical-youth culture."

McLuhan, Marshall. Understanding media; the extensions of man. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1964.
A look at the media that people use as an extension of themselves. McLuhan looks at the spoken word, the written word, clothing, housing, money, comics, the press, games, advertisements, the telephone, movies, radio, and many more things.

Packard, Vance Oakley. The hidden persuaders. New York: Pocket Books, 1981.

Peck, Abe. Uncovering the sixties: the life and times of the underground press. New York: Pantheon Books, 1985.

Small, Melvin. Covering dissent: the media and the anti-Vietnam war movement. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1994.

Spigel, Lynn, and Michael Curtin, eds. The revolution wasn't televised: sixties television and social conflict. New York: Routledge, 1997.

Steel, Ronald. Walter Lippmann and the American century. Boston: Little, Brown, 1980.

Wyatt, Clarence R. Paper soldiers: the American press and the Vietnam war. New York: W.W. Norton, 1993.

Men

Ehrenreich, Barbara. The hearts of men: American dreams and the flight from commitment. Garden City, NY: Anchor Press, 1983.

The Military

Blaufarb, Douglas S. The counterinsurgency era: U.S. doctrine and performance, 1950 to the present. New York: Free Press, 1977.

Cortright, David. Soldiers in revolt: the American military today. New York: Anchor Press, 1975.
A history of GI protest from 1968-1972. Not only did the GIs protest the Vietnam war: they also protested the authoritarianism of the military.

Currey, Cecil B. Edward Lansdale: the unquiet American. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1988.

Ferber, Michael, and Staughton Lynd. The resistance. Boston: Beacon Press, 1971.
An interesting and readable history of the Resistance--the anti-war resistance--that began in 1960 in the U.S.

Helmer, John. Bringing the war home: the American soldier in Vietnam and after. New York: Free Press, 1974.

Krulak, Victor H. First to fight: an inside view of the U.S. Marine Corps. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1984.

Palmer, Gregory. The McNamara strategy and the Vietnam war: program budgeting in the Pentagon, 1960-1968. Westport CT: Greenwood Press, 1978.

The Pentagon papers: the Senator Gavel edition. 4 vols. Boston: Beacon Press, 1972.
The actual documents with extensive commentary. Coverage is from 1940-1968. This is the edition most often cited by others.

Sorley, Lewis. Thunderbolt: General Creighton Abrams and the army of his times. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992.

Taylor, Maxwell D. Swords and plowshares. New York: W.W. Norton, 1972.

Trewhitt, Henry L. McNamara. New York: Harper & Row, 1971.
United States. Department of Defense. United States-Vietnam relations, 1945-1967. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1971.
In this 12-volume set are the actual documents of the U.S. involvement in Vietnam from the time of the French rule until 1967, after the U.S. had made huge commitments to fight in Vietnam. It was published by the Government Printing Office at the request of the Department of Defense. This documentary history was what made up the Pentagon Papers leaked by Daniel Ellsberg and published by The New York Times in 1971.

Music

Marcus, Greil. Mystery train: images of America in rock'n'roll music. New York: Dutton, 1990.
A look at rock 'n' roll and what it says about American culture. Only a few artists are explored--the Band, Sly Stone, Randy Newman, Elvis--as symbolic Americans.

Scaduto, Anthony. Bob Dylan. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1971.
A biography up to 1970 and Dylan's release of the album New Morning. Dylan reviewed the manuscript for this book and made some suggestions for it.

Shelton, Robert. No direction home: the life and music of Bob Dylan. New York: Beech Tree Books, 1986.
A thorough biography that takes Dylan from his childhood in Minnesota to the Live Aid concert in 1985. Includes a discography and song index.

Taylor, Derek. It was twenty years ago today. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1987.
Taylor was press officer and assistant to the Beatles in 1964. As such, he became familiar with the most famous music group of the 1960s. In this book, he tells the story of 1967--its music, its countercultural happenings, the Diggers, the Haight-Ashbury, the Human Be-In, the march on the Pentagon. Includes photographs.

Wiener, Jon. Come together: John Lennon in his time. New York: Random House, 1984.

1968: The Pivotal Year

Caute, David. The year of the barricades: a journey through 1968. New York: Harper & Row, 1988.
A description and analysis of the events of 1968 in the U.S., France, Czechoslovakia, Britain, Mexico, and Japan. Caute analyzes the relationship of the new left to the counterculture and women's liberation. Photos and a chronology are included.

Farber, David R. Chicago '68. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1988.
Farber was too young to be involved in the riots in Chicago in 1968, so he explains that in this book he tries to make the scene alive for those who weren't there. He picks the Democratic convention because he feels it was representative of the conflicts that were splitting society at the time. He sees the various groups using speech to shape their worlds, so he uses their various speech patterns to show how the groups came into conflict.

Fraser, Ronald et al. 1968: a student generation in revolt. London: Chatto & Windus, 1988.

Katsiaficas, George. The imagination of the New Left: a global analysis of 1968. Boston: South End Press, 1987.

Kaiser, Charles. 1968 in America: music, politics, chaos, counterculture, and the shaping of a generation. New York: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1988.
Kaiser adds to the history of that pivotal year. His account is very readable and adds a new perspective to the wide range of 1968 events. Photographs included.

Koning, Hans. Nineteen sixty-eight: a personal report. New York: Norton, 1987.
Koning relates his experiences of 1968 as a participant in most of the events. He sees 1968 as a year when "people power" meant something.

Larner, Jeremy. Nobody knows: reflections on the McCarthy campaign of 1968. New York: Macmillan, 1970.
Larner was one of McCarthy's speech writers during the campaign. He says he has written this book to try to show what happened--why McCarthy was such a hopeful choice, but ultimately failed in the election.

Mailer, Norman. Miami and the siege of Chicago: an informal history of the Republican and Democratic conventions of 1968. New York: D.I. Fine, 1968.
Mailer's account of the Republican national convention in Miami and the Chicago Democratic convention. As a participant, Mailer used New Journalistic techniques as he did in Armies of the Night.

Unger, Irwin, and Debi Unger. Turning point: 1968. New York: Scribner, 1988.
The authors discuss the divisions that occurred during 1968--between Black Power and other civil rights movements; division in the Democratic party; division in the New Left. It was also the year of new alliances for homosexuals and feminists. It was the year America started swinging back to the right. It was a pivotal year. Photos included.

White, Theodore. The making of the President, 1968. New York: Atheneum Publishers, 1969.
White describes the 1968 campaign and the campaign year. The year starts with Tet, moves through Johnson's renunciation and Robert Kennedy's death, to the victory of Richard Nixon at the year's end.

Richard M. Nixon

Aitken, Jonathan. Nixon: a life. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1993.

Ambrose, Stephen E. Nixon: ruin and recovery, 1973-1990. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992.

Ambrose, Stephen E. Nixon: the education of a politician, 1913-1962. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1987.
A political biography based on Nixon's memoirs, tape-recorded conversations, and reports from associates. Ambrose admits that Nixon is a study in contradictions and that his purpose is only to point out these contradictions.

Ambrose, Stephen E. Nixon: the triumph of a politician, 1962-1972. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1989.

Bundy, William. A tangled web: the making of foreign policy in the Nixon presidency. New York: Hill and Wang, 1998.

Colodny, Len, and Robert Gettlin. Silen coup: the removal of a president. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1991.

Garment, Leonard. Crazy rhythm: my journey from Brooklyn, jazz, and Wall Street to Nixon's White House, Watergate, and beyond. New York: Times Books, 1997.

Haldeman, H.R. The ends of power. New York: Times Books, 1978.
Haldeman claims this is the true story of Watergate from Nixon's closest aide.

__________. The Haldeman diaries: inside the Nixon White House. New York: G.P. Putnam's, 1994.

Hersh, Seymour M. The price of power: Kissinger in the Nixon White House. New York: Summit Books, 1983.
A very detailed account of U.S. foreign policy during the Nixon years.

Hoff, Joan. Nixon reconsidered. New York: Basic Books, 1994.

Kutler, Stanley I. The wars of Watergate: the last crisis of Richard Nixon. New York: Knopf, 1990.
An account of Watergate and an analysis of the reasons for Nixon's downfall. Very detailed and comprehensive.

__________, ed. Abuse of power: the new Nixon tapes. New York: Free Press, 1997.

Lukas, J. Anthony. Nightmare: the underside of the Nixon years. New York: Viking Press, 1976.
A comprehensive account of the Watergate affair. Lukas' information comes from published sources: the Nixon tapes, and interviews.

Morris, Roger. Uncertain greatness: Henry Kissinger and American foreign policy. New York: Harper & Row, 1977.

Nixon, Richard M. In the arena: a memoir of victory, defeat and renewal. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1990.

__________. RN: the memoirs of Richard Nixon. 2 vols. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1978.
Nixon's autobiography up to 1974, the end of his presidency. Based on written diaries, tapes, and recollections. Photos included.

Parmet, Herbert S. Richard Nixon and his America. Boston: Little, Brown, 1990.

Public papers of the presidents of the United States. Richard M. Nixon. Washington: U.S.Government Printing Office, 1974.

Safire, William. Before the fall: an inside view of the pre-Watergate White House. New York: Da Capo Press, 1975.

Schell, Jonathan. The time of illusion. New York: Knopf, 1976.
Schell looks at the Nixon years by trying to make into a whole the fragments that were told to the American public and those that were kept secret by the Nixon administration.

Schudson, Michael. Watergate in American memory: how we remember, forget and reconstruct the past. New York: Basic Books, 1992.

Small, Melvin. The presidency of Richard Nixon. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1999.

Summers, Anthony. The arrogance of power: the secret world of Richard Nixon. New York: Viking, 2000.

Szulc, Tad. The illusion of peace: foreign policy in the Nixon years. New York: Viking Press, 1978.

White, Theodore H. The making of the president, 1972. New York: Atheneum Publishers, 1973.
White covers the campaigns of Nixon and McGovern. He concentrates more on Nixon, possibly because Nixon was such an interesting character, he won by such a landslide, and he got himself involved in Watergate.

Wicker, Tom. One of us: Richard Nixon and the American dream. New York: Random House, 1991.
A consideration of Nixon from after his defeat in California in 1962 until the end of his presidency. Wicker does not concentrate on Watergate, but instead on Nixon the man and what made him an important political figure.

Witcover, Jules. The resurrection of Richard Nixon. New York: Putnam, 1970.

Politics

Andrew, John A. The other side of the sixties: Young Americans for Freedom and the rise of conservative politics. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1997.

Blum, John Morton. Years of discord: American politics and society, 1961-1974. New York: W.W. Norton, 1991.

Brennan, Mary C. Turning right in the sixties: the conservative capture of the GOP. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1995.

Buhle, Mari Jo, Paul Buhle, and Dan Georgakas. Encyclopedia of the American left. New York: Garland, 1990.

DeBennedetti, Charles. The peace reform in American history. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1980.

Donner, Frank J. The age of surveillance: the aims and methods of America's political intelligence system. New York: Knopf, 1980.

Edsall, Thomas Byrne, and Mary D. Edsall. Chain reaction: the impact of race, rights and taxes on American politics. New York: Norton, 1991.

Fraser, Steve, and Gary Gerstle. The rise and fall of the New Deal order, 1930-1980. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1989.

Goldwater, Barry M. The conscience of a conservative. New York: McFadden-Bartell Corp., 1964.

Heath, Jim F. Decade of disillusionment: the Kennedy-Johnson years. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1975.
Heath interprets the 1960s as a time which seemed to offer a lot of promise, but was in reality a decade when Americans were struggling to escape from their own "Armageddon." He looks at the interactions among the leaders of the period and notes the immense amount of government materials accumulated that were closed to society.

Hofstadter, Richard. The paranoid style in American politics, and other essays. New York: Knopf, 1965.

Jacobs, Paul, and Saul Landau, eds. The new radicals: a report with documents. New York: Random House, 1966.
Descriptions of the various groups that radical youth were involved in or sympathetic to: SNCC, SDS, FSM, war protests, and others. The documents further explain the aims and ideologies of these groups and include documents from SNCC, "The Port Huron Statement," interviews, and proclamations. A chronology of movement events covers 1954-1965.

Leffler, Melvyn P. A preponderance of power: national security, the Truman administration, and the cold war. Stanford CA: Stanford University Press, 1992.

McQuaid, Kim The anxious years: America in the Vietnam-Watergate era. New York: Basic Books, 1989.
McQuaid takes a close look at the 1968 presidential campaign, the Vietnam war, and Watergate as representative of the failures of the American power establishment.

Mueller, John E. War, presidents, and public opinion. New York: Wiley, 1973.

Nash, George H. The conservative intellectual movement in America since 1945. New York: Basic Books, 1976.

Newfield, Jack. A prophetic minority. New York: New American Library, 1966.
The "prophetic minority" is the new left. Newfield analyzes this group and explores its relationship to the rest of American society. He believed this group was going to have a noticeable, positive effect on history.

Oglesby, Carl. The yankee and cowboy war: conspiracies from Dallas to Watergate. Mission, KS: Sheed, Andrews, & McMeel, 1976.
Oglesby argues that Dallas and Watergate were links in a chain of conspiracies of coup and countercoup among the American elites.

Phillips, Kevin P. The emerging Republican majority. New Rochelle, NY: Arlington House, 1969.

Powers, Thomas. The man who kept the secrets: Richard Helms & the CIA. New York: Knopf, 1979.

Rogin, Michael Paul. "Ronald Reagan," the movie: and other episodes in political demonology. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987.

Rostow, Walt W. The diffusion of power: an essay in recent history. New York: Macmillan, 1972.

Schlesinger, Arthur M., Jr. The imperial presidency. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1973.
Schlesinger looks at the rise of presidential power in relation to the Vietnam war and to Watergate. He believes that the U.S. needs a strong president, but a president within constitutional limitations.

Shafer, D. Michael. Deadly paradigms: the failure of U.S. counterinsurgency policy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1988.

Watters, Pat, and Reese Cleghorn. Climbing Jacob's ladder: the arrival of negroes in southern politics. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1967.

Wittner, Lawrence S. Rebels against war: the American peace movement, 1933-1983. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1984.

Radio and Television

Barnouw, Eric. Tube of plenty: the evolution of American television. New York: Oxford University Press, 1975.

Religion

Ellwood, Robert S. The sixties spiritual awakening: American religion moving from modern to postmodern. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1994.

Retrospectives on the Era

Collier, Peter and David Horowitz. Destructive generation: second thoughts about the sixties. New York: Summit Books, 1989.
Part political analysis and part memoir, this book is a look back at the people and events of the 1960s. The authors assess the times and reject them as both dangerous and immature.

Macedo, Stephen, ed. Reassessing the sixties: debating the political and cultural legacy. New York: W.W. Norton, 1997.

Social History

Albert, Judith Clavir and Stewart Edward Albert, eds. The sixties papers: documents of a rebellious decade. New York: Praeger, 1984.
Documents issued by people and organizations during the 1960s. Includes "Howl," the Port Huron Statement, SNCC Position Paper: Women in the Movement, the speeches of Martin Luther King, Weathermen papers and others.

Anderson, Terry H. The movement and the sixties. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.
A history of the movements in the sixties, starting with the Greensboro sit-ins and continuing until Wounded Knee, in 1973. Anderson traces how one incident built on another to create the unprecedented activism of the late sixties and early seventies.

Bacciocco, Edward J. The new left in America: reform to revolution, 1956-1970. Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 1974.
A history of the new left from its beginnings to the breakdown of SDS in 1969. Focuses mainly on SDS. Also tries to assess the importance of the new left in American society.

Bell, Daniel. The end of ideology: on the exhaustion of political ideas in the fifties. New York: Free Press, 1967.

Berman, Paul. A tale of two utopias: the political journey of the generation of 1968. New York: Norton, 1996.
Berman traces the history of the '60s radicals through four stages: 1)the radicalism of 1968; 2) the movement from radicalism to liberalism around the world; 3) the downfall of Communism in 1989; 3) unresolved questions about history and world progress.

Breines, Wini. Community and organization in the new left, 1962-1968: the great refusal. New York: Praeger, 1982.
A study of the vision and organization of the new left. Breines was a part of the new left at Wisconsin and Cornell universities, and then she went on to become a feminist, using much of what she had learned from the new left in organizing the feminist movement.

Burns, Stewart. Social movements of the 1960s: searching for democracy. New York: Twayne Publishers, 1990.

Chafe, William H. The unfinished journey. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.
The author looks at post-WWII society as a new society--women, the family, workers, and minorities. He argues that American social reform had thrived until 1968 and that since 1968, America has been in an era of conservatism.

Chalmers, David. And the crooked places made straight. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991.
Chalmers has constructed an excellent account of the 1960s. He also offers an assessment of the times.

Davies, Gareth. From opportunity to entitlement: the transformation and decline of great society liberalism. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1996.

Dellinger, David T. More power than we know: the people's movement toward democracy. Garden City, NY: Anchor Press, 1975.
Mostly focused on protest of the Vietnam war. Dellinger makes a case for nonviolence while at the same time encouraging revolution in the established forms of power.

Diggins, John Patrick. The rise and fall of the American left. New York: W.W. Norton, 1992.

Farrell, James J. The spirit of the sixties: making postwar radicalism. New York: Routledge, 1997.

Freeman, Jo, ed. Social movements of the sixties and seventies. New York: Longman, 1983.
A collection of essays which analyzes social movements. Social movement is defined and the various specific movements analyzed include California farmworkers, the disabled, draft resistance, tenants, anti-nuclear activists, SDS and Weathermen, civil rights, and new religions.

Gallup, George H. The Gallup poll: public opinion, 1935-1971. New York: Random House, 1972.

__________. The Gallup poll: public opinion, 1972-1977. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1978.

Gitlin, Todd. The sixties: years of hope, days of rage. New York: Bantam Books, 1987.
A comprehensive history of the era, centering on the political student movement. A later perspective than Coming Apart (O'Neill), with not as much scholarly research. However, told by one who was a part of the movement.

Gosse, Van. Where the boys are: Cuba, cold war America, and the making of the new left. New York: Verso, 1993.

Gottlieb, Annie. Do you believe in magic?: the second coming of the sixties generation. New York: Times Books, 1987.
Gottlieb recounts the 1960s through interviews with the people born between 1945-1955. She feels that there is a new interest among these people in reflecting on what happened during the 1960s and a new stirring of energy in the ones she talked to.

Harrington, Michael. The other America: poverty in the United States. New York: Macmillan, 1969.

Hodgson, Godfrey. America in our time. New York: Doubleday, 1976.
A history of the 1960s from Kennedy through Nixon.

Hoffman, Abbie. Woodstock nation: a talk-rock album. New York: Random House, 1969.
Hoffman's reflections on the Woodstock Festival as well as on the times and movement people in general.

Hoffman, Abbie, and Daniel Simon, eds. The best of Abbie Hoffman. New York: Four Walls Eight Windows, 1989.
Includes excerpts from Revolution for the hell of it, Woodstock nation, Steal this book, and newer writings from 1981 to 1988.

Howard, Gerald, ed. The sixties: art, politics, and media of our most explosive decade. New York: Paragon House, 1991.
Selected readings from the sixties by such authors as Schlesinger, C. Wright Mills, James Baldwin, Eldridge Cleaver, Norman O. Brown, R.D. Laing, Susan Sontag, and Marshall McLuhan.

Isserman, Maurice. If I had a hammer--: the death of the old left and the birth of the new left. New York: Basic Books, 1987.
Historical treatment of the old left, 1930s - 1950s, and the sixties new left and an analysis of their linkages. A few photos included.

Jackson, Kenneth T. Crabgrass frontier: the suburbanization of the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.

Jones, Landon Y. Great expectations: America and the baby boom generation. New York: Coward-McCann, 1980.
The baby boom generation are those people born between 1946 and 1964. The youth of the 1960s were a part of this generation. In every stage of their lives they have had a significant impact because of their great numbers. Jones analyzes this group and the results of its dominance, both in the past and as they enter middle-age and older. An interesting look at the generation, but some of the predictions have already proven false.

King, R. The party of Eros: radical social thought and the realm of freedom. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1972.

Lasch, Christopher. The culture of narcissism: American life in an age of diminishing expectations. New York: Norton, 1978.
A complicated analysis of society that Lasch says embodies "the despair of a society that cannot face the future."

Levy, Peter B. The new left and labor in the 1960s. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

Long, Priscilla, comp. The new left: a collection of essays. Boston: P. Sargent, 1969.
A brief history of the new left by Staughton Lynd and essays by theorists and activists such as C. Wright Mills, Howard Zinn, Noam Chomsky, Daniel Berrigan, and Paul Goodman.

Miller, Jim. Democracy is in the streets: from Port Huron to the Siege of Chicago. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1970.
Miller studies the new left, specifically participatory democracy, by taking a biographical approach, focusing on a few of the leaders of SDS in the 1960s. Photos included.

Mills, C. Wright. White collar: the American middle classes. New York: Oxford University Press, 1951.

Nuttall, Jeff. Bomb culture. London: MacGibbon & Kee, 1968.

Oglesby, Carl, comp. The new left reader. New York: Grove Press, 1969.
Selections from new left writers internationally, e.g., C. Wright Mills, Herbert Marcuse, Louis Althusser, Frantz Fanon, Fidel Castro, Huey Newton, and Mark Rudd.

Patterson, James T. America's struggle against poverty, 1900-1994. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1994.

Reich, Charles A. The greening of America: how the youth revolution is trying to make America livable. New York: Random House, 1970.
The influence of Reich's book is attested to by its frequent citation in many books about the 1960s. In it, Reich discusses the new revolution brought about by a new consciousness in youth. Very optimistic and idealistic.

Riesman, David. The lonely crowd: a study of the changing American character. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1950.

Rossinow, Doug. The politics of authenticity: liberalism, Christianity, and the new left in America. New York: Columbia University Press, 1998.

Roszak, Theodore. The making of a counter culture: reflections on the technocratic society and its youthful opposition. New York: Doubleday, 1969.
Roszak thought that the counterculture had the potential to free our society from the objective confines of technocracy. He explored different political theorists (e.g., Marcuse, Norman Brown, Marx, and Freud), mysticism, the use of drugs, and theories of utopia. This book was a major influence on scholars and students of the time.

Slater, Philip Elliot. The pursuit of loneliness: American culture at the breaking point. Boston: Beacon Press, 1976.
The first edition was published in 1970, and it contained more of the stresses of the 1960s--university revolt, the counterculture, political confrontations. In both editions, Slater was examining the forces that he said were "unraveling" American society. The Vietnam war was one force he left in the 1976 edition.

Stern, Jane and Michael. Sixties people. New York: Knopf, 1990.
The Sterns categorize the different cultures of sixties people and describe, at times humorously, each type. They include perky girls, playboys, young vulgarians, surfers and party animals, folkniks, British imitators, hippies, rebels, and Mr. & Mrs. Average. Photos included.

Teodori, Massimo, comp. The new left: a documentary history. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1969.
A history and an anthology. Teodori's historical notes come from his experience in the new left in Europe. He has also collected readings from the U.S. by Staughton Lynd, SLATE, Tom Hayden, Todd Gitlin, Mario Savio, SDS, Richard Flacks, David Dellinger, Bernardine Dohrn, Raymond Mungo, and many others.

Tipton, Steven M. Getting saved from the sixties: moral meaning in conversion and cultural change. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1982.
A study of the conversion of 1960s youth to alternative religious movements to find moral meanings in their lives.

Vickers, George R. The formation of the new left: the early years. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1975.

Viorst, Milton. Fire in the streets: America in the 1960s. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1979.
A good history of the 1960s, beginning with the civil rights struggle and ending with Kent State and the spring of 1970. Focuses on many people important to the decade so that the reader gets to know people as well as events. More political than social.

Young, Nigel. Infantile disorder?: the crisis and decline of the new left. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1977.

Technology

McDougall, Walter A. The heavens and the earth: a political history of the space age. New York: Basic Books, 1985.

Vietnam and Indochina

Allen, Douglas, and Ngo Vinh Long. Coming to terms: Indochina, the United States and the war. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1991.

Braestrup, Peter, ed. Vietnam as history: ten years after the Paris Peace Accords. Washington, DC: University Press of America, 1984.

Bui Diem with David Chanoff. In the jaws of history. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1987.

Bui, Tin. Following Ho Chi Minh: the memoirs of a North Vietnamese colonel. Honolulu, HI: University of Hawaii Press, 1995.

Burke, John P., and Fred I. Greenstein. How presidents test reality: decisions on Vietnam, 1954 and 1965. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1989.
An analysis of the differing ways that Eisenhower and Johnson made decisions on U.S. involvement in Vietnam.

Davidson, Phillip B. Vietnam at war: the history, 1946-1975. Novato CA: Presidio Press, 1988.

Duiker, William J. The communist road to power in Vietnam. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1996.

Fall, Bernard. Hell in a very small place; the siege of Diem Bien Phu. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1966.

__________. Street without joy. London: Pall Mall Press, 1964.

__________. The two Viet-Nams: a political and military analysis. New York: Praeger, 1967.

Franklin, H. Bruce. M.I.A. or mythmaking in America. Brooklyn, NY: L. Hill Books, 1992.

Goulden, Joseph C. Truth is the first casualty: the Gulf of Tonkin affair, illusion and reality. Chicago: Rand McNally, 1969.
Goulden makes a case for his belief that the United States acted hastily, with incomplete information, in the Gulf of Tonkin incident.

Halberstam, David. The making of a quagmire: America and Vietnam during the Kennedy era. New York: Knopf, 1965.

Hamilton-Merritt, Jane. The tragic mountains: the Hmong, the Americans and the secret wars for Laos, 1942-1992. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1993.

Hammer, Ellen J. A death in November: America in Vietnam, 1963. New York: E.P. Dutton, 1987.

Jamieson, Neil L. Understanding Vietnam. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993.

Kaplan, Lawrence S., Denise Artaud, and Mark R. Rubin, eds. Dien Bien Phu and the crisis of Franco-American relations, 1954-1955. Wilmington, DE: SR Books, 1990.

Karnow, Stanley. Vietnam: a history. New York: Viking Press, 1983.
A comprehensive look at the war from both sides. Includes personal accounts from participants as well as documentation from government sources and other collections.

Khanh, Huynh Kim. Vietnamese communism, 1925-1945. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1982.

Ky, Nguyen Cao. Twenty years and twenty days. New York: Stein & Day, 1976.

Lacouture, Jean. Ho Chi Minh: a political biography. New York: Random House, 1968.

__________. Vietnam between two truces. New York: Random House, 1966.

Lancaster, Donald. The emancipation of French Indochina. New York: Oxford University Press, 1967.

MacPherson, Myra. Long time passing: Vietnam and the haunted generation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1984.
Stories of those who went to Vietnam and those who did not. Balanced slightly on the side of those who went. MacPherson points to the lack of recognition of those who went and describes their problems reintegrating into society. She also explores problems of traumatic stress syndrome and Agent Orange.

Marr, David G. Vietnam, 1945: the quest for power. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

__________.Vietnamese anticolonialism, 1885-1925. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1971.

Nixon, Richard. No more Vietnams. New York: Arbor House, 1985.

Palmer, Bruce. The 25-year war: America's military role in Vietnam. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 1984.

Pike, Douglas. PAVN: People's Army of Vietnam. Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1986.

__________. Viet Cong: the organization and techniques of the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam. Cambridge, MA: M.I.T. Press, 1966.

__________. Vietnam and the Soviet Union: anatomy of an alliance. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1987.

Porter, Gareth. Vietnam: the definitive documentation of human decisions. Stanfordville, NY: E.M. Coleman Enterprises, 1979.

Rotter, Andrew Jon. The path to Vietnam: origins of the American commitment to Southeast Asia. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1987.

Sheehan, Neil. The Pentagon papers: as published by the New York Times, based on the investigative reporting by Neil Sheehan. New York: Bantam Books, 1971.
The papers that caused a fine furor when they were published, documenting what really happened with the Vietnam war.

Spector, Ronald H. The United States Army in Vietnam. Advice and support: the early years, 1941-1960. Washington DC: Center of Military History, 1983.

Truong Nhu Tang, with David Chanoff and Doan Van Toai. A Viet Cong memoir. San Diego: Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, 1985.

Warner, Denis Ashton. The last Confucian. New York: Macmillan, 1963.

Vietnamese Conflict

Anderson, David L., ed. Shadow on the White House: presidents and the Vietnam war, 1945-1975. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1993.

Andrews, William R. The village war: Vietnamese Communist revolutionary activities in Dinh Tuong province, 1960-1964. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1973.

Appey, Christian G. Working class war: American combat soldiers and Vietnam. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1993.

Baker, Mark. Nam: the Vietnam war in the words of the men and women who fought there. New York: Morrow, 1981.

Baritz, Loren. Backfire: a history of how American culture led us into Vietnam and made us fight the way we did. New York: W. Morrow, 1985.
Baritz uses the ideals of "the city on the hill" and America as God's promised land as the bases for analysis of U.S. involvement in Vietnam.

Baskir, Lawrence M., and William A. Strauss. Chance and circumstance: the draft, the war, and the Vietnam generation. New York: Knopf, 1978.
The authors examine the draft-age men who did not fight in the Vietnam war--those who managed to avoid it, the deserters, and the exiles. They also discuss the amnesty offered during Carter's administration.

Bergerud, Eric M. The dynamics of defeat: the Vietnam war in Hau Nghia Province. Boulder CO: Westview Press, 1991.

Berman, Larry. Lyndon Johnson's war: the road to stalemate in Vietnam. New York: Norton, 1989.
Berman went back to 1967-68 to explore Johnson's war and the incompatibility between Johnson's foreign and domestic policies.

__________. Planning a tragedy: the Americanization of the war in Vietnam. New York: W.W. Norton, 1982.

Bilton, Michael, and Kevin Sim. Four hours in My Lai. New York: Viking, 1982.

Blum, Robert M. Drawing the line: the origin of the American containment policy in East Asia. New York: Norton, 1982.

Braestrup, Peter. Big story: how the American press and television reported and interpreted the crisis of Tet 1968 in Vietnam and Washington. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1977.
Braestrup studied the Associated Press, the New York Times, Time, Newsweek, and the news shows of ABC, CBS, and NBC for their coverage of Tet. He found that the journalists did not distort the news but were overwhelmed by the events, so that any distortion of news was influenced more by complexity than ideology. Photos included.

__________, ed. Vietnam as history: ten years after the Paris Peace Accords. Washington, DC: University Press of America, 1984.

Buttinger, Joseph. Vietnam: a dragon embattled. New York: Praeger, 1967.

Cable, Larry E. Conflict of myths: the development of American counterinsurgency doctrine and the Vietnam war. New York: New York University Press, 1986.

Capps, Walter H. The Vietnam reader. New York: Routledge, 1991.

Caputo, Philip. A rumor of war. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1977.

Castle, Timothy N. At war in the shadow of Vietnam: U.S. military aid to the Royal Lao government, 1955-1975. New York: Columbia University Press, 1993.

Charlton, Michael, and Anthony Moncrieff. Many reasons why: the American involvement in Vietnam. London: Scholar Press, 1978.
Based on a series of radio programs broadcast on BBC in 1977. Includes information on fighting the war, the role of television, and protest in the U.S. Nguyen Ky is interviewed, as well as General Westmoreland.

Chomsky, Noam. Rethinking Camelot: JFK, the Vietnam war, and U.S. political culture. Boston: South End Press, 1993.

Cincinnatus. Self-destruction, the disintegration and decay of the United States Army during the Vietnam era. New York: Norton, 1981.

Clarke, Jeffrey J. Advice and support: the final years, 1965-1973. Washington DC: Center of Military History, U.S. Army, 1988.

Clodfelter, Mark. The limits of air power: the American bombing of North Vietnam. New York: Free Press, 1989.

Colby, William. Lost victory: a firsthand account of America's sixteen-year involvement in Vietnam. Chicago: Contemporary Books, 1989.

Cooper, Chester L. The lost crusade: America in Vietnam. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1970.

DeBennedetti, Charles. An American ordeal: the antiwar movement of the Vietnam era. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1990.
The story of the antiwar movement in the U.S. from its pre-Vietnam roots in 1955, until 1975. The author maintains that the war was more about America and its future policies than it was about Vietnam. Photos included.

DiLeo, David L. George Ball, Vietnam, and the rethinking of containment. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1991.

Dittmar, Linda, and Gene Michaud, eds. From Hanoi to Hollywood: the Vietnam war in American film. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1990.

Dommen, Arthur J. Conflict in Laos: the politics of neutralization. New York: Praeger, 1965.

Duiker, William J. Sacred war: nationalism and revolution in a divided Vietnam. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1995.

_________. U.S. containment policy and the conflict in Indochina. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1994.

Egendorf, Arthur. Healing from the war: trauma and transformation after Vietnam. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1985.

Ehrhart, W.D. Vietnam-Perkasie: a combat marine memoir. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1983.

Emerson, Gloria. Winners and losers: battles, retreats, gains, lossees and ruins from a long war. New York: Random House, 1976.
Emerson was assigned to Vietnam in 1970 by the New York Times. In this book, she goes back and forth between then and 1976 sharing hers and others' experiences in Vietnam and in the United States as a result of Vietnam.

Fitzgerald, Frances. Fire in the lake: the Vietnamese and the Americans in Vietnam. Boston: Little, Brown, 1972.
Fire in the Lake comes from the I Ching and is the image of revolution. Fitzgerald wrote this book after being in Vietnam in 1966. He realized there was very little written about Vietnam and the cultural issues involved in their struggles. This book is an attempt to fill that gap.

Futrell, Robert F. The United States Air Force in Southeast Asia: the advisory years to 1965. Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History, 1981.

Gaiduk, Ilya V. The Soviet Union and the Vietnam war. Chicago: I.R. Dee, 1996.

Garfinkle, Adam. Telltale hearts: the origins and impact of the Vietnam antiwar movement. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995.
Garfinkle argues that the antwar movement had little impact on ending the war, and may in fact have caused it to be extended. He does argue that since the war, the movement people have had a tremendous impact on postwar America.

Gettleman, Marvin E. et al. Vietnam and America: a documented history. New York: Grove Press, 1985.
A collection of readings which mainly focus on the war. However, there is a section on the movements against the war, mostly documents that are statements of resistance.

Gibbons, William Conrad. The U.S. government and the Vietnam war: executive and legislative roles and relationships. Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press, 1986-1995.

Gibson, James William. The perfect war: techno-war in Vietnam. Boston: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1987.

Goff, Stanley, and Robert Sanders. Brothers: black soldiers in the Nam. Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1982.

Goodman, Allan E. Lost peace: America's search for a negotiated settlement of the Vietnam war. Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 1978.

Greene, Bob. Homecoming: when the soldiers returned from Vietnam. New York: Putnam, 1989.

Haley, P. Edward. Congress and the fall of South Vietnam and Cambodia. Rutherford: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1982.

Hall, Mitchell K. Because of their faith: CALCAV and religious opposition to the Vietnam war. New York: Columbia University Press, 1991.
This book explores the Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam's resistance activities throughout the war.

Halstead, Fred. Out now!: a participant's account of the American movement against the Vietnam war. New York: Monad Press, 1978.
An account of the resistance to the war which covered events from 1960-1975. The writer was an active participant in the movement. Photographs included.

Hammond, William M. Public affairs: the military and the media, 1962-1968. Washington DC: Center of Military History, U.S. Army, 1988.

Heineman, Kenneth J. Campus wars: the peace movement at American state universities in the Vietnam era. New York: New York University Press, 1993.

Hellman, John. American myth and the legacy of Vietnam. New York: Columbia University Press, 1986.

Herr, Michael. Dispatches. New York: Knopf, 1977.
Michael Herr was a free-lance writer covering the Vietnam war from the mid- to late-1960s. This book is his account of what he saw of American men fighting in Vietnam, before and during the Tet offensive in 1968.

Herring, George C. America's longest war: the United States and Vietnam, 1950-1975. 2d ed. New York: Knopf, 1986.
An account of the Vietnam war, emphasizing the American side of it and also exploring antiwar protest in the U.S. and its impact on the conduct of the war.

__________. LBJ and Vietnam: a different kind of war. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1994.

__________, ed. The secret diplomacy of the Vietnam war: the negotiating volumes of the Pentagon Papers. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1983.

Hersh, Seymour M. My Lai 4: a report on the massacre and its aftermath. New York: Random House, 1970.
Based on interviews of the men who participated and transcripts from the government investigation of the attack on My Lai. The book was written before the trials took place.

Hess, Gary R. Vietnam and the United States: origins and legacy of war. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1990.

Hooper, Edwin Bickford, Dean C. Allard, and Oscar P. Fitzgerald. The United States Navy and the Vietnam conflict. Washington, DC: Department of the Navy, 1976.

Hoopes, Townsend. The limits of intervention: an inside account of how the Johnson policy of escalation was reversed. New York: D. McKay Co., 1969.

Hunt, Andrew E. The turning: a history of the Vietnam Veterans Against the War. New York: New York University Press, 1999.

Hunt, Richard A. Pacification: the American struggle for Vietnam's hearts and minds. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1995.

Isaacs, Arnold R. Without honor: defeat in Vietnam and Cambodia. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1983.

Jeffords, Susan. The remasculinization of America: gender and the Vietnam war. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1989.
Jeffords defends the argument that current interest in the Vietnam war is based on relations of gender and a reinforcement of masculinity and patriarchy.

Kahin, George McTurnan. Intervention: how America became involved in Vietnam. New York: Knopf, 1986.

Kaiser, David. American tragedy: Kennedy, Johnson and the origins of the Vietnam war. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2000.

__________, and John W. Lewis. The United States in Vietnam. New York: Dial Press, 1967.

Kerry, John, and the Vietnam Veterans Against the War. The new soldier. New York: Macmillan, 1971.
Photographs from the VVAW march on Washington, April, 1971. Testimony from The Winter soldier Investigation, February, 1971.

Khong, Yuen Foong. Analogies at war: Korea, Munich, Dien Bien Phu, and the Vietnam decisions of 1965. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1992.

Kimball, Jeffrey. Nixon's Vietnam war. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1998.

Kinnard, Douglas. The certain trumpet: Maxwell Taylor and the American experience in Vietnam. Washington: Brassey's, 1991.

__________. The war managers. Hanover, NH: University Press of New England, 1977.

Kolko, Gabriel. Anatomy of a war. New York: Pantheon Books, 1985.

Krepinevich, Andrew R. The army and Vietnam. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986.

Kutler, Stanley I., ed. Encyclopedia of the Vietnam war. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1996.

Lansdale, Edward Geary. In the midst of wars: America's mission to Southeast Asia. New York: Harper & Row, 1972.

Lembcke, Jerry. Spitting image: myth, memory and the legacy of Vietnam. New York: New York University Press, 1998.

Levy, David W. The debate over Vietnam. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991.

Lewis, Lloyd B. Tainted war: culture and identity in Vietnam war narratives. Westport, CT: Grenwood Press, 1985.

Lewy, Guenter. America in Vietnam. New York: Oxford University Press, 1975.

Lifton, Robert Jay. Home from the war: Vietnam veterans: neither victims nor executioners. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1973.
An analysis of why the American soldiers committed such atrocities as My Lai in Vietnam from a psychologist who has specialized in psychohistory and the Vietnam era.

Lomperis, Timothy J. The war everyone lost--and won: America's intervention in Viet Nam's twin struggles. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1984.

Lynd, Alice. We won't go: personal accounts of war objectors. Boston: Beacon Press, 1968.
Accounts by people who chose not to participate in tbe Vietnam war. Most were people who registered as conscientious objectors or who went to prison.

Maclear, Michael. The ten-thousand day war: Vietnam 1945-1975. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1981.

Maneli, Meiczyslaw. War of the vanquished. New York: Harper & Row, 1971.

Marshall, Kathryn. In the combat zone: an oral history of American women in Vietnam, 1966-1975. Boston: Little, Brown, 1987.
Interviews with twenty women who were in Vietnam, some who were nurses, some who were there for other reasons.

McMaster, H.R. Dereliction of duty: Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the lies that led to Vietnam. New York: HarperCollins, 1997.

McNamara, Robert S. In retrospect: the tragedy and lessons of Vietnam. New York: Times Books, 1995.

__________, James G. Blight, and Robert K. Brigham Argument without end: in search of answers to the Vietnam tragedy. New York: Public Affairs, 1999.

Moore, Harold G., and Joseph L. Galloway. We were soldiers once . . . and young: Ia Drang, the battle that changed the war in Vietnam. New York: Random House, 1992.

Moss, George. Vietnam, an American ordeal. Englewood Cliffs NJ: Prentice Hall, 1990.

Mullen, Robert W. Blacks and Vietnam. Washington: University Press of America, 1981.

Newman, John M. JFK and Vietnam: deception, intrigue, and the struggle for power. New York: Warner Books, 1992.

Nguyen, Tien Hung, and Jerrold L. Schechter. The palace file. New York: Harper & Row, 1986.

Oberdorfer, Don. Tet! New York: Da Capo Press, 1971.

Olson, James S., and Randy Roberts. Where the domino fell: America and Vietnam, 1945 to 1990. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1991.

Palmer, Dave Richard. Summons of the trumpet: U.S.--Vietnam in perspective. San Rafael, CA: Presidio Press, 1978.

Papp, Daniel S. Vietnam: the view from Moscow, Peking, Washington. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1981.

Peers, W.R. The My Lai inquiry. New York: Norton, 1979.

Pisor, Robert. The end of the line: the siege of Khe Sanh. New York: Norton, 1982.

Podhoretz, Norman. Why we were in Vietnam. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1982.
A re-examination of how and why the U.S. got involved in Vietnam and an assessment of America's decision to get involved. Podhoretz argues that the U.S. was not immoral because of its conduct of the war.

Polner, Murray. No victory parades: the return of the Vietnam veteran. New York: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston, 1971.

Porter, Gareth. Peace denied: the United States, Vietnam and the Paris Agreement. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1975.

Powers, Thomas. The war at home: Vietnam and the American people, 1964-1968. New York: Grossman Publishers, 1973.
A history of opposition to the Vietnam war up to 1968, when Johnson announced he would not run for the presidency and that he was halting the bombing in North Vietnam. Powers argues that the opposition was responsible both for the de-escalation of the war and the defeat of Johnson.

Prados, John. The hidden history of the Vietnam war. Chicago: I.R. Dee, 1995.

Pratt, John Clark, comp. Vietnam voices: perspectives on the war years, 1941-1982. New York: Viking, 1984.

Prochnau, William. Once upon a distant war. New York: Times Books, 1995.

Race, Jeffrey. War comes to Long An: revolutionary conflict in a Vietnamese province. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1972.

Raskin, Marcus G., and Bernard B. Fall, eds. The Viet-Nam reader: articles and documents on American foreign policy and the Viet-Nam crisis. New York: Random House, 1965.

Rowe, John Carlos, and Rick Berg, eds. The Vietnam war and American culture. New York: Columbia University Press, 1991.

Rust, William J., and the editors of U.S. News Books. Kennedy in Vietnam. New York: Scribner, 1985.

Salisbury, Harrison E., ed. Vietnam reconsidered: lessons from a war. New York: Harper & Row, 1984.

Santoli, Al. Everything we had: an oral history of the Vietnam war by thirty-three American soldiers who fought it. New York: Random House, 1981.
A personal view, or actually several personal views. The people interviewed were from different positions in the military. Especially interesting is an interview with a prisoner of war.

Schandler, Herbert Y. The unmaking of a president: Lyndon Johnson and Vietnam. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1977.

Schulzinger, Robert D. A time for war: the United States and Vietnam, 1941-1975. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.

Shafer, D. Michael, ed. The legacy: the Vietnam war in the American imagination. Boston: Beacon Press, 1990.
Essays that explore the ways that the Vietnam war is still affecting America today. The writers explore issues such as the veterans, the media, blacks, women, domestic policy, and the Vietnamese now living in America.

Schalk, David L. War and the ivory tower: Algeria and Vietnam. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.

Sharp, Ulysses S. Grant. Strategy for defeat: Vietnam in retrospect. San Rafael, CA: Presidio Press, 1978.

__________ and William C. Westmoreland. Report on the war in Vietnam as of 30 June 1968. Washington, DC: U.S. Superintendent of Documents, 1969.

Shawcross, William. Sideshow: Kissinger, Nixon and the destruction of Cambodia. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1979.

Sheehan, Neil. After the war was over: Hanoi and Saigon. New York: Random House, 1992.

__________. A bright shining lie: John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam. New York: Random House, 1988.

Small, Melvin. Johnson, Nixon and the doves. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1988.
A study of the impact of antiwar activities on Johnson and Nixon. Small's conclusion is that protest was a powerful influence on presidential decisionmaking about the war.

__________, and William D. Hoover, ed. Give peace a chance: exploring the Vietnam antiwar movement : essays from the Charles DeBenedetti Memorial Conference. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1992.

Smith, Ralph B. An international history of the Vietnam war. London: Macmillan, 1983-1991.

Snepp, Frank. Decent interval: an insider's account of Saigon's indecent end. New York: Random House, 1977.

Spector, Ronald H. After Tet: the bloodiest year in Vietnam. New York: Free Press, 1993.

Stanton, Shelby L. The rise and fall of an American army: U.S. ground forces in Vietnam, 1965-1973. Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1985.

Stockdale, Jim and Sybil. In love and war: the story of a family's ordeal and sacrifice during the Vietnam years. New York: Harper & Row, 1984.

Summers, Harry G. On strategy: a critical analysis of the Vietnam war. Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1983.

Taylor, Clyde, comp. Vietnam and black America: an anthology of protest and resistance. Garden City, NY: Anchor Press, 1973.
Taylor says that black opposition to the war was different from white. Whites wanted to end the war out of fatigue and frustration. Blacks were more concerned with human rights and racial justice. His selection of readings supports this view.

Terry, Wallace. Bloods: an oral history of the Vietnam war by black veterans. New York: Random House, 1984.
Stories from 20 black Vietnam veterans about their war experiences and what happened to them after they returned home. Photographs included.

Thayer, Carlyle A. War by other means: national liberation and revolution in Viet-Nam, 1954-60. Sydney, Australia: Allen & Unwin, 1989.

Thayer, Thomas. War without fronts: the American experience in Vietnam. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1985.

Thies, Wallace J. When governments collide: coercion and diplomacy in the Vietnam conflict, 1964-1968. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980.

Thompson, W. Scott, and Donald D. Frizzell. The lessons of Vietnam. New York: Crane, Russak, 1977.

Trullinger, James Walker. Village at war: an account of revolution in Vietnam. New York: Longman, 1980.

Turley, William S. The second Indochina war: a short political and military history. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1986.

Turner, Kathleen J. Lyndon Johnson's dual war: Vietnam and the press. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985.

United States. Marine Corps. U.S. Marines in Vietnam. 7 vols. Washington, DC: History and Museums Division, U.S. Marine Corps, 1977.

Van Devanter, Lynda. Home before morning: the story of an Army nurse in Vietnam. New York: Beaufort Books, 1983.
Van Devanter served as a nurse in Vietnam in 1969-1970. This is her account of her experiences there and the difficulties she had readjusting to life when she got back.

Van Tieng Dung. Our great spring victory: an account of the liberation of South Vietnam. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1977.

Vietnam Veterans Against the War. The winter soldier investigation: an inquiry into American war crimes. Boston: Beacon Press, 1972.

Vogelsang, Sandy. The long dark night of the soul: the American intellectual left and the Vietnam war. New York: Harper & Row, 1974.
Vogelsang looks at four leftist periodicals to trace the development of leftist opposition to the Vietnam war. The opposition went through three stages: Vietnam was seen as a lapse in judgment; it was seen as an immoral exercise; then it was seen as politically illegitimate. Vogelsang believes that the Vietnam was coalesced fragmented dissent and led many to a personal "leftward" odyssey.

Walker, Keith. A piece of my heart: the stories of twenty-six American women who served in Vietnam. Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1986.

Walsh, Jeffrey, and James Aulich. Vietnam images: war and representation. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1989.

Walt, Lewis W. Strange war, strange strategy: a general's report on Vietnam. New York: Funk & Wagnalls, 1970.

Wells, Tom. The war within: America's battle over Vietnam. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1994.

Werner, Jayne Susan, and David Hunt, eds. The American war in Vietnam. Ithaca NY: Southeast Asian Program, Cornell University, 1993.

Westmoreland, William C. A soldier reports. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1976.

Wirtz, James J. The Tet offensive: intelligence failure in war. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1991.

Young, Marilyn B. The Vietnam-American wars, 1945-1990. New York: HarperCollins, 1991.

Zaroulis, Nancy, and Gerald Sullivan. Who spoke up? American protest against the war in Vietnam, 1963-1975. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1984.
Traces the history of protest against the war in the U.S. from its beginnings in 1963 until the end of the war in 1975. Includes a glossary of acronyms for the various protest organizations.

Zhai, Qiang. China and the Vietnam wars, 1950-1975. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000.

Women

Breines, Wini. Young, white, and miserable: growing up female in the fifties. Boston: Beacon Press, 1992.

Echols, Alice. Daring to be bad: radical feminism in America, 1967-1975. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1989.

Evans, Sara. Personal politics: the roots of women's liberation in the movement and the new left. New York: Random House, 1979.
A history of the women's liberation movement as coming from civil rights activism and from the new left. Evans' analysis comes from interviews with many women who were instrumental in beginning the movement that eventually lured many women away from the male-dominated Vietnam protest work.

Firestone, Shulamith. The dialectic of sex: the case for feminist revolution. New York: Morrow, 1970.
Basing feminism in its historical context, Firestone does one of the first Marxist analyses of feminism. She expands on Engels' dialectical materialism, substituting sex for class.

Freeman, Jo. The politics of women's liberation: a case study of an emerging social movement and its relation to the policy process. New York: McKay, 1975.
A study, through participant observation, of the burgeoning women's liberation movement. The author participated in the organization of the first independent women's liberation group in the country. She discusses the roots of the movement as well as NOW, small groups, and policy.

Friedan, Betty. The feminine mystique. New York: Norton, 1963.
This is one of the seminal works which triggered the '60s women's liberation movement. The "mystique" Friedan refers to is the idea that women should find complete fulfillment in the home as wives and mothers.

Harrison, Cynthia. On account of sex: the politics of women's issues, 1945-1968. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988.

Hold, Judith. Rebirth of feminism. New York: Quadrangle Books, 1971.
An analysis of the resurgence of feminism in the U.S. in the 1960s. Includes a history of U.S. feminism, a discussion of the "biological differences" argument, "feminist social critique," and resistance to feminism. Section III delineates areas of action within the feminist movement. There is a chronology of feminist activities 1961-1971, and several feminist documents are included.

Meyerowitz, Joanne. Not June Cleaver: women and gender in postwar America, 1945-1960. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1994.

Morgan, Robin, ed. Sisterhood is powerful: an anthology of writings from the women's liberation movement. New York: Random House, 1970.

Stern, Susan. With the Weathermen: the personal journal of a revolutionary woman. New York: Doubleday, 1975.
Susan Stern was involved with the Weathermen from their beginnings in 1969 until 1972. This is the story of her experiences.

Swerdlow, Amy. Women Strike for Peace: traditional motherhood and radical politics in the 1960s. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993.

World Politics

Chomsky, Noam. Year 501: the conquest continues. Boston: South End Press, 1993.

Youth

Cook, Bruce. The beat generation. New York: Scribner, 1971.
Mostly about the Beats of the 1950s, although the writer does give some unusual reflections on the Woodstock concert in the last chapter.

Goodman, Paul. Growing up absurd: problems of youth in the organized society. New York: Random House, 1960.
An influential book on the problems of growing up in technological society and the reasons that made youth reject becoming part of the Establishment.

Hebdige, Dick. Subculture, the meaning of style. London: Methuen, 1979.

Hoffman, Abbie. Revolution for the hell of it. New York: Dial Press, 1968.
Writings from Hoffman on revolution, the March on the Pentagon (1967), Yippies, the Chicago Democratic convention, and other subjects.

Jacobs, Harold, comp. Weatherman. Berkeley: Ramparts Press, 1970.
A history and analysis of the Weatherman movement. Articles, photographs, cartoons, and communiques from the group.

Keniston, Kenneth. Young radicals; notes on committed youth. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1968.
Observations of the work of Vietnam Summer, a group organizing other groups to oppose the Vietnam war during the summer of 1967. Specifically, Keniston studies the politicization and commitment of a small group of leaders of the Summer.

Miller, Timothy. The hippies and American values. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1991.
Miller describes the hippies of the '60s. He's not analyzing the political revolutionaries, but the cultural radicals, drawing mainly from underground newspapers of the day.

Mills, Richard. Young outsiders: a study of alternative communities. New York: Pantheon Books, 1973.

Von Hoffman, Nicholas. We are the people our parents warned us against. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1968.
A series of vignettes on the people in the Haight-Ashbury during 1967. Von Hoffman uses the New Journalism technique of focusing on personalities rather than events. A lot of attention is given to drug use.

Yankelovich, Daniel. The new morality: a profile of American youth in the 70's. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1974.

Resources used for compiling this bibliography

Allyn, David. Make Love Not War: The Sexual Revolution: An Unfettered History. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2000.

Anderson, David L., ed. Facing MyLai: Moving Beyond the Massacre. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1998.

Anderson, Terry. The Sixties. 2nd ed. New York: Pearson/Longman, 2004.

Andrew, John A., III. Lyndon Johnson and the Great Society. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1998.

Andrews, Geoff, et al. New Left, New Right, and Beyond: Taking the Sixties Seriously. London: Macmillan Press, Ltd., 1999.

Berman, Paul. A Tale of Two Utopias: the Political Journey of the Generation of 1968. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1996.

Bloom, Alexander, ed. Long Time Gone: Sixties America Then and Now. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Bodroghkozy, Aniko. Groove Tube: Sixties Television and the Youth Rebellion. Durham: Duke University Press, 2001.

Bradley, Richard. American Political Mythology from Kennedy to Nixon. New York: Peter Lang, 2000.

Branch, Taylor. Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years, 1963-1965. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1998.

Braunstein, Peter, and Michael William Doyle, eds. Imagine Nation: The American Counterculture of the 1960s and '70s. New York: Routledge, 2002.

Brick, Howard. Age of Contradiction: American Thought and Culture in the 1960s. New York: Twayne, 1998.

Brinkley, Douglas, and Richard T. Griffiths, eds. John F. Kennedy and Europe. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1999.

Bundy, William. A Tangled Web: The Making of Foreign Policy in the Nixon Presidency. New York: Hill and Wang, 1998.

Burner, David. Making Peace with the Sixties. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1996.

Burns, Stewart. To the Mountaintop: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Sacred Mission to Save America, 1955-1968. San Francisco: HarperCollins, 2004.

Busch, Peter. All the Way with JFK? Britain, the US, and the Vietnam War. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Buzzanco, Robert. Masters of War: Military Dissent and Politics in the Vietnam Era. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

__________. Vietnam and the transformation of American life. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 1999.

Cavallo, Dominick. A Fiction of the Past: The Sixties in American History. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999.

Clymer, Kenton J., ed. The Vietnam War: Its History, Literature and Music. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1998.

Dallek, Robert. Flawed Giant: Lyndon Johnson and His Times, 1961-1973. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

__________. An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917-1963. Boston: Little, Brown, 2003.

Davis, James Kirkpatrick. Assault on the Left: The FBI and the Sixties Antiwar Movement. Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997.

DeKoven, Marianne. Utopia Limited: The Sixties and the Emergence of the Postmodern. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004.

Donaldson, Gary. Liberalism's Last Hurrah: The Presidential Campaign of 1964. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 2003.

Echols, Alice. Shaky Ground: The '60s and Its Aftershocks. New York: Columbia University Press, 2002.

Elbaum, Max. Revolution in the Air: Sixties Radicals Turn to Lenin, Mao, and Che. London: Verso, 2002.

Ellsberg, Daniel. Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers. New York: Viking, 2001.

Farber, David, and Jeff Roche, eds. The Conservative Sixties. New York: Peter Lang, 2003.

Farrell, James J. The Spirit of the Sixties: Making Postwar Radicalism. New York: Routledge, 1997.

Franklin, H. Bruce. Vietnam and Other American Fantasies. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2000.

__________. The Vietnam War: In American Stories, Songs, and Poems. Boston: St. Martin's/Bedford Books, 1996.

Gardner, Lloyd C., and Ted Gittinger, eds. Vietnam: The Early Decisions. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1997.

Graham, Herman, III. The Brothers' Vietnam War: Black Power, Manhood, and the Military Experience. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2003.

Green, Jonathon. All Dressed Up: The Sixties and the Counterculture. London: Pimlico, 1998.

Gross, Michael. My Generation: Fifty Years of Sex, Drugs, Rock, Revolution, Glamour, Greed, Valor, Faith, and Silicon Chips. New York: Cliff Street Books, 2000.

Hall, James C. Mercy, Mercy Me: African-American Culture and the American Sixties. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Hammond, William M. Public Affairs: The Military and the Media, 1968-1973. Washington: Center of Military History, 1996.

__________. Reporting Vietnam: Media and Military at War. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1998.

Heale, M.J. The Sixties in America: History, Politics and Protest. Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, 2001.

Hixson, Walter L, ed. The Vietnam Antiwar Movement. New York: Garland Publishing, Inc., 2000.

Hendrickson, Paul. The Living and the Dead: Robert McNamara and Five Lives of a Lost War. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1996.

Hunt, Andrew E. The Turning: A History of Vietnam Veterans against the War. New York: NYU Press, 1999.

Hunt, Michael H. Lyndon Johnson's War: America's Cold War Crusade in Vietnam, 1945-1968. New York: Hill and Wang, 1996.

Isaacs, Arnold R. Vietnam Shadows: The War, Its Ghosts, and Its Legacy. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997.

Isserman, Maurice, and Michael Kazin. America Divided: The Civil War of the 1960s. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000.

Jacobs, Ron. The Way the Wind Blew: A History of the Weather Underground. New York: Verso, 1997.

Jeffreys-Jones, Rhodri. Peace Now! American Society and the Ending of the Vietnam War. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1999.

Jones, Howard. Death of a Generation: How the Assassination of Diem and JFK Prolonged the Vietnam War. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Kaiser, David. American Tragedy: Kennedy, Johnson, and the Origins of the Vietnam War. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000.

Kimball, Jeffrey. Nixon's Vietnam War. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1998.

__________. The Vietnam War Files: Uncovering the Secret History of Nixon-Era Strategy. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2004.

Kimball, Roger. The Long March: How the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s Changed America. San Francisco: Encounter Books, 2000.

Klatch, Rebecca E. A Generation Divided: The New Left, the New Right, and the 1960s. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.

Knight, Peter. Conspiracy Culture: From the Kennedy Assassination to The X-Files. New York: Routledge, 2000.

Laffan, Barry. Communal Organization and Social Transition: A Case Study from the Counterculture of the Sixties and Seventies. New York: Peter Lang, 1997.

Lembcke, Jerry. The Spitting Image: Myth, Memory, and the Legacy of Vietnam. New York: New York University Press, 1998.

Lind, Michael. Vietnam, the Necessary War: A Reinterpretation of America's Most Disastrous Conflict. New York: The Free Press, 1999.

Logevall, Fredrik. Choosing War: The Lost Chance for Peace and the Escalation of War in Vietnam. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.

Lomperis, Timothy J. From People's War to People's Rule: Insurgency, Intervention, and the Lessons of Vietnam. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

Lubin, David M. Shooting Kennedy: JFK mara and Five Lives of a Lost War. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1996.

Hunt, Andrew E. The Turning: A History of Vietnam Veterans against the War. New York: NYU Press, 1999.

Hunt, Michael H. Lyndon Johnson's War: America's Cold War Crusade in Vietnam, 1945-1968. New York: Hill and Wang, 1996.

Isaacs, Arnold R. Vietnam Shadows: The War, Its Ghosts, and Its Legacy. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997.

Isserman, Maurice, and Michael Kazin. America Divided: The Civil War of the 1960s. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000.

Jacobs, Ron. The Way the Wind Blew: A History of the Weather Underground. New York: Verso, 1997.

Jeffreys-Jones, Rhodri. Peace Now! American Society and the Ending of the Vietnam War. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1999.

Jones, Howard. Death of a Generation: How the Assassination of Diem and JFK Prolonged the Vietnam War. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Kaiser, David. American Tragedy: Kennedy, Johnson, and the Origins of the Vietnam War. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000.

Kimball, Jeffrey. Nixon's Vietnam War. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1998.

__________. The Vietnam War Files: Uncovering the Secret History of Nixon-Era Strategy. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2004.

Kimball, Roger. The Long March: How the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s Changed America. San Francisco: Encounter Books, 2000.

Klatch, Rebecca E. A Generation Divided: The New Left, the New Right, and the 1960s. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.

Knight, Peter. Conspiracy Culture: From the Kennedy Assassination to The X-Files. New York: Routledge, 2000.

Laffan, Barry. Communal Organization and Social Transition: A Case Study from the Counterculture of the Sixties and Seventies. New York: Peter Lang, 1997.

Lembcke, Jerry. The Spitting Image: Myth, Memory, and the Legacy of Vietnam. New York: New York University Press, 1998.

Lind, Michael. Vietnam, the Necessary War: A Reinterpretation of America's Most Disastrous Conflict. New York: The Free Press, 1999.

Logevall, Fredrik. Choosing War: The Lost Chance for Peace and the Escalation of War in Vietnam. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.

Lomperis, Timothy J. From People's War to People's Rule: Insurgency, Intervention, and the Lessons of Vietnam. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

Lubin, David M. Shooting Kennedy: JFK and the Culture of Images. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003.

Macedo, Stephen, ed. Reassessing the Sixties: Debating the Political and Cultural Legacy. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1997.

Maga, Timothy. The 1960s. New York: Facts on File, 2003.

Mahoney, Richard D. Sons and Brothers: The Days of Jack and Bobby Kennedy. New York: Arcade Publishing, 1999.

Maraniss, David. They Marched into Sunlight: War and Peace, Vietnam and America, October 1967. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2003

Margolis, Jon. The Last Innocent Year: America in 1964, the Beginning of the 'Sixties.' New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1999.

Martin, Susan. Decade of Protest: Political Posters from the United States, Viet Nam, Cuba, 1965-1975. Santa Monica, CA: Smart Art Press, 1996.
Marwick, Arthur. The Sixties: Cultural Revolution in Britain, France, Italy, and the United States, c. 1958-c.1974. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

McGregor, Peter. Cultural Battles: The Meaning of the Viet Nam-USA War. Sydney, Australia: SCAM Publications, 1998.

McMahon, Robert J. Major Problems in the History of the Vietnam War: Documents and Essays. 3d ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2003.

McMillian, John, and Paul Buhle. The New Left Revisited. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2003.

McWilliams, John C. The 1960s Cultural Revolution. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2000.

Miles, Barry. In the Sixties. London: Jonathan Cape, 2002.

Moise, Edwin E. Tonkin Gulf and the escalation of the Vietnam war. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

Moser, Richard R. The New Winter Soldiers: GI and Veteran Dissent During the Vietnam Era. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press,1996.

Neale, Jonathan. A People's History of the Vietnam War. New York: The New Press, 2003.

Olson, James S., ed. Historical Dictionary of the 1960s. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1999.

__________, and Rando Roberts. My Lai: A Brief History with Documents. Boston: Bedford Books, 1998.

Olson, Keith W. Watergate: The Presidential Scandal that Shook America. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2003.

Palermo, Joseph A. In His Own Right: The Political Odyssey of Senator Robert F. Kennedy. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001.

Rabby, Glenda Alice. The Pain and the Promise: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Tallahassee, Florida. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1999.

Rabe, Stephen G. The Most Dangerous Area in the World: John F. Kennedy Confronts Communist Revolution in Latin America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999.

Raskin, Jonah. For the Hell of It: The Life and Times of Abbie Hoffman. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996.

Rhodes, Joel P. The Voice of Violence: Performative Violence as Protest in the Vietnam Era. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 2001.

Riggenbach, Jeff. In Praise of Decadence. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, 1998.

Robbins, Mary Susannah, ed. Against the Vietnam War: Writings by Activists. Syracuse NY: Syracuse University Press, 1999.

Rorabaugh, W.J. Kennedy and the Promise of the Sixties. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Spann, Edward K. Democracy's Children: The Young Rebels of the 1960s and the Power of Ideals. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, Inc., 2003.

Steel, Ronald. In Love with Night: The American Romance with Robert Kennedy. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2000.

Stephens, Julie. Anti-Disciplinary Protest: Sixties Radicalism and Postmodernism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Torgoff, Martin. Can't Find My Way Home: America in the Great Stoned Age, 1945-2000. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2004.

Turner, Fred. Echoes of Combat: The Vietnam War in American Memory. New York: Anchor/Doubleday, 1996.

Turner, Karen Gottschang, and Phan Thanh Hao. Even the Women Must Fight: Memories of War from North Vietnam. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1998.

Vandiver, Frank E. Shadows of Vietnam: Lyndon Johnson's Wars. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1997.

Varon, Jeremy. Bringing the War Home: the Weather Underground, the Red Army Faction, and Revolutionary Violence in the Sixties and Seventies. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004.

Warlaumont, Hazel G. Advertising in the 60s: Turncoats, Traditionalists, and Waste Makers in America's Turbulent Decade. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2001.

Wilson, Sondra Kathryn, ed. In Search of Democracy: The NAACP Writings of James Weldon Johnson, Walter White, and Roy Wilkins (1920-1977). New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Witcover, Jules. The Year the Dream Died: Revisiting 1968 in America. New York: Warner Books, 1997.


Young, Marilyn B., and Robert Buzzanco, eds.. A Companion to the Vietnam War. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2002.

I welcome an comments and suggestions on this bibliography. Please send them to Rebecca Jackson

Revised 3/25/04, 11/5/04, 5/13/05, 7/18/05, 9/23/05, 3/31/06, 9/21/06, 12/6/07, 2/23/09, 5/10/11