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News Service

Annette Hacker, director, (515) 294-3720

Office: (515) 294-4777

News

Jack Trice sculpture

Tribute to Trice

"Jack Trice's figure can be found outside the stadium that bears his name, despite a fleeting college career that lasted only two games for the Cyclones. That might not seem like much. But for those who have learned about Trice's tragic story of sacrifice, it remains one of the most compelling in the history of college football." Writer Tim Griffin recounts the story of Iowa State's first black athlete in a recent article on ESPN.com.

ESPN article.

ISU horticulture student earns national intern award

Eric Pitzen, a senior horticulture major at ISU, recently was awarded the Greenhouse Product News/Nexus Intern Scholarship, annually awarded to the national intern of the year for the greenhouse industry. As recipient of the award, Pitzen was featured in the cover story of the January 2008 issue of Greenhouse Product News magazine.

News release.

Author Farai Chideya to speak at Iowa State Feb. 25

Award-winning author Farai Chideya will speak at 8 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 25, in the Memorial Union Sun Room at ISU. She began her career as a researcher and reporter for Newsweek magazine and is currently the host of National Public Radio's "News & Notes."

News release.

ISU professor helps design Speedo suit to be worn by top swimmers in Beijing Olympics

Rick Sharp, a professor of exercise physiology in ISU's kinesiology department, played a key role in the design team that created Speedo's new LZR Racer swimsuit. It is expected to be worn by most United States swimmers and swimmers from more than 50 countries at the Beijing Olympics in August.

News release.

'Talk' topic: Energy conservation at Iowa State

President Gregory Geoffroy and Gene Takle, professor of both agronomy and geological and atmospheric sciences, will be guests on the Feb. 14 edition of Iowa Public Radio's "Talk of Iowa" (11 a.m.-noon, AM 640). The discussion will focus on Geoffroy's new advisory committee on energy conservation and global climate change, of which Takle is a member. Questions to the call-in show can be mailed in advance to talk@iastate.edu.

Pruetz on national TV

ISU primatologist Jill Pruetz and her discovery that chimpanzees hunt with tools will be featured twice on national TV soon. On Monday, Feb. 18, Pruetz will appear on the Today show, which begins at 7 a.m. on NBC. Pruetz' work also will be part of a Nova documentary "Ape Genius" airing at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19, on PBS.

'Ape Genius' details

ISU associate professor named U.S. Deputy Undersecretary of Ag for Food Safety

Iowa State University Associate Professor Scott Hurd has been named the U. S. Department of Agriculture's deputy undersecretary for food safety.

News release.

ISU study finds economic impact of ethanol in Iowa to support 8,169 jobs

ISU economist Dave Swenson has authored a new report, titled "The Economic Impact of Ethanol Production in Iowa." It projects that when the 15 ethanol plants currently under construction are brought online within a year or so, there will be 8,169 jobs supported by the state's 42 ethanol operations.

News release.

ISU anthropologist Pruetz named National Geographic Emerging Explorer for 2008

ISU Associate Professor of Anthropology Jill Pruetz has been selected as a National Geographic Emerging Explorer for 2008. The Emerging Explorers Program recognizes and supports young adventurers, scientists, photographers and storytellers -- rising talents who are already making a difference early in their fields.

News release.

Eggshells are small pleasures in 243 diverse collages by ISU artist

Exercising her "art" muscles by working in the studio daily during 2007, Art and Design Professor Ingrid Lilligren created 243 collages, using eggshells and dry pastels, and emailed the images to 90 of her closest friends. Although identical in size and structure, the "Small Pleasures" are as diverse as the colors of life. They will be exhibited Feb. 9-14 at Lilligren's studio in downtown Ames.

News release.

ISU's Bystrom predicts GOP race decided, Democrats still open after 'Super Tuesday'

Dianne Bystrom, director of ISU's Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics, sees the biggest upset of 'Super Tuesday' being that John McCain could practically lock up the GOP nomination with a strong showing, while the final two Democratic candidates -- Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama -- will probably split the vote and continue to battle each other for at least another month.

News release.

Iowa State chemists track how drug changes, blocks flu virus

Two Iowa State University chemists have discovered an anti-virus drug attacks influenza A by changing the motion and structure of a proton channel necessary for the virus to infect healthy cells. Mei Hong, the John D. Corbett Professor in Chemistry at Iowa State, said the findings are particularly important because mutations of the type A virus are resistant to the anti-virus drug.

News release.

Cyclone alley

In the alley

Five seasons in, Cyclone Alley is one of the best student fan sections in the country.

See story.

In the news

Farmland more valuable than ever

USA Today

Owners of all sizes of farms are benefiting from record-setting farmland prices, but the high prices are a barrier for young farmers starting out, says ISU's Mike Duffy.

See story.

Upgraded technology aids stadium viewing

USA Today

Jim Oliver, director of ISU's Virtual Reality Applications Center, says revolutionary 3-D technology "is right around the corner" at NFL stadiums and other sports venues.

See story.

Bumper stickers mix politics with humor

San Francisco Chronicle

ISU graduate student Patti Brown has analyzed 70 years of presidential campaign bumper stickers for her graduate advertising seminar in the Greenlee School of Journalism.

See story.

When just handing over a ring won't do

The New York Times

Over-the-top marriage proposals may be memorable, but an ISU associate professor of sociology has found that people link more conventional proposals with stronger relationships. Alicia Cast and her colleagues surveyed more than 2,000 university students and found that participants want to convey a certain message, creating "in the minds of others that we are a serious and legitimate couple."

See story.