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Annette Hacker, director, (515) 294-3720

Office: (515) 294-4777

News

Former employee who attempted to access Ames Lab arrested

ISU Police arrested Alexandra Tsokol at 1:30 p.m. on April 29 for Violation of a No Contact or Protective Order. Earlier today the Ames Laboratory buildings were locked as a precautionary measure to help prevent Tsokol (a former employee) from gaining unauthorized access to the facility. Ames Lab buildings remain locked for now.

News release.

ISU career placement professionals provide grads survival tips for tighter job market

Four ISU career placement professionals say that while the job prospects for this spring's graduates is not as gloomy as the economy, new job seekers have to be well-prepared to gain employment. They offer them tips to be successful in their searches.

News release.

Researcher works with European Space Agency to test moisture satellite

Brian Hornbuckle, an agronomy professor at ISU, is assisting the European Space Agency research soil moisture content.

News release.

Faculty-staff couple head for Peace Corps service in Ghana

It's not your typical faculty leave. But for Chris and Tammi Martin, joining the Peace Corps is the assignment of a lifetime. Chris, associate professor of art and design, and Tammi, administrative specialist in the Center for Crops Utilization Research, depart June 7 for two years of service in Ghana.

News release.

ISU study finds Iowa Caucuses generate $15.5 million in state economic impact

A new report by ISU economist Dave Swenson titled "The Economic Impact of the Iowa Caucus: Gauging the Worth of its First-in-the-Nation Position?," found that the major presidential candidates' economic impact to the state was $15.5 million in total sales in the six months preceding the Iowa Caucuses.

News release.

Iowa State University helps catch cheaters as summer's fastest athletes compete

The Kentucky Derby, May 3 at Churchill Downs in Louisville, uses Iowa State University researchers to check the horses for performance-enhancing drugs. Iowa State University researchers have been working with the derby for six years, and during that time drug testing has become a household topic.

News release.

Iowa State study finds TV portrayals of psychological therapy influences willingness to seek it

Three Iowa State psychologists collaborated on a study that found that television portrayals may make viewers less likely to seek psychological services themselves. Their paper titled "The Influence of Television on Willingness to Seek Therapy," was published in the March issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychology.

News release.

ISU dominates 2008 Des Moines Arts Festival Emerging Iowa Artists

Fifteen of the 24 jury-selected Emerging Iowa Artists in the 2008 Des Moines Arts Festival (June 27-29) hail from ISU's College of Design. Twelve are students and three are alumni. The Emerging Iowa Artists Program identifies Iowa's up-and-coming young artists.

News release.

Parade watchers

Enjoying the view

Veishea parade lovers jam the steps of Beardshear April 12 to watch the show. Check the slide show on the ISU homepage for more Veishea photos.

ISU homepage.

VISIONS magazine cover

Biorenewables research

VISIONS magazine looks at biorenewables research, a hot topic on the ISU campus. The spring 2008 issue also celebrates the magazine's 20th anniversary with a look at memorable stories.

Bioeconomy story | VISIONS.

In the news

Taxing Virtual Worlds

Forbes

In one recent law review article, a quartet of professors from Iowa State University argue for a "cash-out" rule--virtual profits in virtual currency wouldn't be taxed when used "in world"; they would be taxed only if they were converted into profits in real currency and transferred out of the game. They would apply this "cash out" rule to all sorts of virtual games.

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PruetzNOVA2

Jill Pruetz, ISU anthropologist, on PBS' Nova.

Almost Human

National Geographic

In 2007 Jill Pruetz, an anthropologist at Iowa State University, reported that a Fongoli female chimp named Tumbo was seen two years earlier, less than a mile from where we are right now, sharpening a branch with her teeth and wielding it like a spear. She used it to stab at a bush baby, a pocket-size, tree-dwelling nocturnal primate that springs from branch to branch like a grasshopper. Until that report, the regular making of tools for hunting and killing mammals had been considered uniquely human behavior.

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