Iowa State University
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News Service

News Service:

Annette Hacker, director,
(515) 294-3720

Office: (515) 294-4777

01-31-07

Contacts:

Ingrid Lilligren, Art and Design, (515) 294-8883, illigr@iastate.edu

Stacy Gage, Dubuque Museum of Art, (563) 557-1851, sgage@dbqart.com

Teddi Barron, News Service, (515) 294-4778, tbarron@iastate.edu

Dubuque Museum of Art to exhibit ISU professor's ceramics, Feb. 27-May 27

AMES, Iowa - Ingrid Lilligren's abstract ceramic sculpture is distinguished by strong colors, whimsical shapes and bold symbolism. During the past 10 years, the Iowa State University art and design associate professor's work has explored a diverse range of conceptual and technical approaches.

An exhibition of 18 of Lilligren's sculptures will be on display at the Dubuque Museum of Art Feb. 27-May 27. The pieces vary in size from small objects that could easily be held in the hand, to life-size works that requires two people to move.

The show, "Ingrid Lilligren, A Certain Consistency. Works 1996-2006," derives its title from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay, "Self Reliance."

Lilligren said a quote from the essay was a point of departure for her show. In the essay, Emerson writes, "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do...Speak what you think today in words as hard as cannon balls, and tomorrow speak what tomorrow thinks in hard words again, though it contradict everything you said today."

"It's about having the courage to speak what you think no matter how hard it sounds, then to have the courage to change and say that you have changed. This is often regarded as inconsistency, but it is really deep courage. I find it inspiring as an artist to think about persisting in the face of one's doubts," Lilligren said.

"My own work expresses my curiosity about many aspects of ceramics and therefore takes a wide range of forms and colors. Many artists work within a narrower formal structure, but I enjoy variety, and my work certainly expresses this appreciation," she said.

The exhibition features Lilligren's most recent work, which is influenced by a 2005 residency at Xiem Clay Center, Pasadena, Calif., and provides a look into the West's vibrant art scene. These works feature the stunning use of crystalline glazes that create an unusual surface, resembling icy patches of frozen color.

In the past two years, her work has been part of shows in California, Connecticut, Kansas, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Texas. Her most recent solo exhibition was in Vallauris, France, where she completed a residency in 2005.

But being able to exhibit in Iowa again is special, Lilligren said.

"I have had few shows in Iowa, and this is one I am looking forward to very much. It's a great opportunity to do outreach and hopefully stimulate interest in the Integrated Studio Arts program in the College of Design," she said.

As part of the exhibition, Lilligren will give a public lecture and will work with a class of high school students from the Dubuque area who are part of the Museum's after school class.

The exhibition is organized by the Dubuque Museum of Art and sponsored by Cottingham & Butler, Dubuque. The museum, located at 701 Locust, is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for students and seniors, free for members and children under 12 and free to all on Thursdays. More information is available at www.dbqart.com or (563) 557-7826.

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dilly dally

Dilly Dally, a porcelain with crystalline glazes, is one of 18 pieces in an exhibition of Ingrid Lilligren's work at the Dubuque Museum of Art Feb. 27-May 27.

Quote

"My own work expresses my curiosity about many aspects of ceramics and therefore takes a wide range of forms and colors. Many artists work within a narrower formal structure, but I enjoy variety, and my work certainly expresses this appreciation."

-Ingrid Lilligren, associate professor of art and design