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News Service

News Service:

Annette Hacker, director,
(515) 294-3720

Office: (515) 294-4777

10-19-05

Contacts:

Rick Sharp, health and human performance, (515) 294-8009

Doug King, health and human performance, (515) 294-8429

Cathy Curtis, College of Human Sciences Communications, (515) 294-8175

Kevin Brown, News Service, (515) 294-8986

Lance Armstrong's trainer to discuss Tour de France winner's training

AMES, Iowa -- He might be described as France's arch nemesis -- the man responsible for the training regimen that has earned American Lance Armstrong seven straight Tour de France championships, much to the host country's chagrin.

For more than 15 years, Edward Coyle, professor of kinesiology and health education at the University of Texas, Austin, and director of the Human Performance Laboratory there, has researched Armstrong's training. The training has pumped his cycling efficiency by 8 percent as he matured from age 21 to 28.

Coyle will speak on "The Physiological Maturation of Lance Armstrong: Sport Reflects Life" as Iowa State University's Pease Family Scholar at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, in the Sun Room, Memorial Union. A public reception will follow at 8:30 p.m. Both events are free and open to the public.

The department of health and human performance in the College of Human Sciences sponsors the event.

Coyle will share Armstrong's training model and philosophy. He'll also discuss how that research is being used for the betterment of all athletes. Coyle notes that at the same time Armstrong increased his muscle power, he reduced his body weight and fat by 10 pounds, thereby increasing his power gain to 18 percent -- an advantage for Tour de France climbs.

Coyle will visit undergraduate and graduate student classes and work with faculty and staff on research during his visit.

"Dr. Coyle is a world-class researcher in exercise physiology known for his research in carbohydrate metabolism, muscle metabolism in aging, and physiological aspects of endurance performance," Rick Sharp, professor of health and human performance, said. "His ability to apply scientific principles and research findings to health, disease, and athletic performance makes him an excellent choice as Pease Family Scholar."

Coyle earned his bachelor's degree in physical education in 1975 from Queens College, New York; a master's degree in exercise physiology from Ball State University, Muncie, Ind., in 1976; and a doctorate in animal physiology from the University of Arizona, Tucson, in 1979. He joined the University of Texas, Austin, in 1982 and was named a full professor in 1990.

Since 2003, he has been the North American delegate to the Sports Nutrition Working Group of the International Olympic Committee. In 1997 he was named a fellow of the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education, Champaign, Ill.

The Pease Family Scholar program was created in memory of Harvey and Bomell Pease, Newport Beach, Calif. The endowment was established in 1991 by their son, Dean Pease, and his wife, Sally, to bring visiting scholars to the Iowa State campus. Dean Pease, who died in 1994, chaired the department of health and human performance from 1987 to 1990.

For more information on the lecture or the Pease Family Scholar program, please visit http://www.hs.iastate.edu/peasescholar/

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Edward Coyle

Edward Coyle

Quick look

The Pease Family Scholar Lecture, "The Physiological Maturation of Lance Armstrong: Sport Reflects Life," will be at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, in the Sun Room of the Memorial Union. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Quote

"Dr. Coyle is a world-class researcher in exercise physiology known for his research in carbohydrate metabolism, muscle metabolism in aging and physiological aspects of endurance performance."

Rick Sharp, Iowa State professor of health and human performance