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News Service

Annette Hacker, manager, (515) 294-3720

Office: (515) 294-4777

News

Thomas named interim Education dean

Iowa State University Provost Benjamin Allen has appointed Jerry Thomas, professor and chair of health and human performance, as interim dean of the College of Education effective Aug. 1.

He replaces Dean Walter Gmelch, who is joining the University of San Francisco.

Earlier this year, President Gregory Geoffroy announced a plan to combine the colleges of Family and Consumer Sciences and Education to reduce administrative costs and enhance synergies between the two colleges. Thomas will fill the interim role until a permanent dean for the combined college is selected.

See complete news release.

Meetings set for Veishea task force committees

Iowa State University's Veishea task force has developed three working groups that will gather information and set the agenda for the larger task force meetings. All meetings are open to the public. Upcoming meetings, agendas and meeting minutes are available at: http://www.iastate.edu/news/04/veishea/.

  • Group 1, the task force work group studying previous Veishea celebrations, will meet Tuesday, June 8, from 2 to 4 p.m. in room 1010G, Student Services Building. Pete Englin, dean of students, chairs Group 1.
  • Group 2, which is examining the underlying causes of celebratory riots, will meet Monday, June 7 at 6:30 p.m., Room 233, Ames City Hall, 515 Clark Ave. Steve Schainker, Ames city manager, is the chair.
  • Group 3 will gather and examine recommendations from other institutions that have experienced celebratory riots and disturbances. Group 3 will meet from 9 to 10:30 a.m. on Monday, June 7, in the conference room, main office, Hamilton Hall (Room 101A). Michael Bugeja, director of ISU's Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication, chairs Group 3.

The next full meeting of the Veishea task force is Monday, June 21, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. in the Great Hall, Iowa State University Memorial Union.

New concurrent degree combines engineering, MBA

Iowa State University will offer a new degree program for engineering undergraduate students that will provide participants with a bachelor of science in engineering and a master of business administration (MBA) degrees concurrently.

The program is being introduced during freshmen orientation and will be announced this fall to junior engineering students, who will be able to enter the program their senior year.

Administered jointly by the College of Business and the College of Engineering, the program initially is open to students majoring in computer, electrical or industrial engineering. The combined program will reduce by one year the time normally required to earn both degrees.

See complete news release.

Pasture land options reviewed

Iowa State University is exploring new uses for land on the northeast side of campus.

The land, approximately 96 acres, has been used as pastures for horses used in animal science courses. It includes three pastures in the Squaw Creek flood plain. Two are north of 13th Street and east of Stange Road, with Squaw Creek running between them. The third pasture is south of 13th Street and east of Haber Road.

ISU's College of Agriculture plans to move the horses to greener pastures at the vacated Dairy Teaching Farm (see related release) on Mortensen Road south of campus.

Moving the horses from the 13th Street and Haber Road pastures opens up the opportunity for the university and the Ames community to use the land for other purposes. ISU has some plans under way, but is seeking public comment from the people of Ames on uses that could benefit the entire community.

See complete news release.

Stone dragon

A magical landscape inspired by Celtic culture is one of 13 gardens selected for a prestigious garden festival in England this summer. "Otherworld Garden" is the creation of Mira Engler, associate professor of landscape architecture.

News release.

ISU in the news

Mother Nature hits crops

Forbes

Some farmers in the upper middle portion of Iowa are estimating they will need to replant 10 to 20 percent of their crop due to May storms.

-- Palle Pedersen, assistant professor of agronomy

Article. (Note: Go to second article on the page.)

GMCs to fuel

New Zealand Herald

Basil Nikolau, professor of biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, was interviewed about plant-based energy by science writer Simon Collins who visited campus last week as part of a New Zealand delegation visiting Iowa to explore biotech collaborations. Nikolau was education in New Zealand.

Article.

Related article.

Back from bankruptcy

MSN/CNBC

While it's illegal for employers to discriminate against someone who has declared bankruptcy, many employers do look at credit reports before hiring or promoting.

"If you have two people who are equally qualified, it's hard for it not to enter the picture."

-- Tahira Hira, assistant to the president

Article.