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News

Daniela Dimitrova Dimitrova

On the election

"TV is the key medium for communication between politicians and voters,"says ISU journalism and communications expert Daniela Dimitrova. "Each year, politicians enter the television battleground equipped with TV spots, sound bites, and TV camera smiles. Polls show that many Americans learn about political issues and form their opinions about political figures based mostly on what they see on TV. I predict that television will be as important as ever in the upcoming 2004 presidential election."

ISU political experts on election year issues.

 
Steffen Schmidt Schmidt

On the election

"The injection of John Edwards has changed the 'karma' of the discussion overnight because Edwards is a difficult candidate for the GOP to run against," says ISU political scientist Steffen Schmidt. "The ratings for the Democratic National convention are likely to break records as people watch to see the new superstar perform on stage."

ISU political experts on election year issues.

James McCormick McCormick

On the election

"The 2004 presidential election is likely to turn on national security issues, unlike any other recent election since the height of the Cold War," says ISU political scientist James McCormick. "While foreign policy issues are rarely decisive in presidential elections, 2004 could well be the exception."

ISU political experts on election year issues.

Robert Lowry Lowry

On the election

"2004 proves once again that you can't take money out of American political campaigns, but you can affect the way it is raised and the route that it takes," says ISU political scientist Robert Lowry.

ISU political experts on election year issues.

 
Kim Conger Conger

On the election

"Turnout will be the important issue in this election," says political scientist Kim Conger. "We are really a 50-50 country and the campaign that best turns out its supporters will benefit."

ISU political experts on election year issues.

 
Ray Dearin Dearin

On the election

"From Wendell Willkie in 1940 until Ronald Reagan in 1980 and 1984, Republicans who accepted their party's nomination for president used the "crusade" metaphor to describe their campaigns," says ISU political scientist Ray Dearin. "Republicans have not just campaigned for the office; they have 'crusaded' for it. Since George H. W. Bush departed from the tradition and chose the "mission" metaphor to describe his quest in 1988, the GOP candidate has eschewed the more heroic label. Whatever metaphor George W. Bush invokes in his New York speech, one can be sure he will not return to the crusade metaphor. In parts of the world "crusaders" are not well received."

ISU political experts on election year issues.

Dianne Bystrom Bystrom

On the election

"Prompted by concerns over a divisive war in Iraq and the national economy, 8 of 10 young voters say the outcome of the 2004 presidential election matters 'a lot,' according to a recent poll," says Dianne Bystrom, director of the Catt Center for Women and Politics. "As activists from political parties, interest groups and non-partisan organizations attempt to capitalize on young voters' increased interest in the 2004 campaign, appealing to young voters remains an elusive endeavor as they are not as loyal to partisan political organizations as older citizens and their motivating interests encompass a broad range of issues."

ISU political experts on election year issues.

Richard PoistPoist

Poist named logistics, operations and MIS department chair

Richard Poist, professor of transportation and logistics at Iowa State, has been named department chair of logistics, operations and management information systems in the College of Business. He had served as interim chair.

Go to news release.

 

Artist to demonstrate wood carving

Visiting artist Armando Jimenez Arragon, Oaxacan, Mexico, will demonstrate traditional Mexican wood carving July 18 (4-5:30 p.m., Memorial Union Gallery). More about Arragon.

OPNET software gift will give business
students an edge

Students in ISU's College of Business will soon benefit from more than $4 million worth of software that will allow them to gain practical experience in simulating and modeling telecommunications networks. The software is an in-kind gift from Bethesda, Md.-based OPNET Technologies.

Go to news release.

External support soars to $274 million in FY 2004

Iowa State University generated more than $274 million in grants, contracts and cooperative agreements during fiscal year 2004, a record high. It's an increase of 19 percent from FY 2003's total of $230 million. The $274 million includes all contracts and grants received directly by Iowa State from federal, state and local government units, corporations and foundations. This funding is used for research, public service/extension activities, educational projects, student financial aid, buildings and equipment.

Go to news release.

Kurt HebertHebert

Hebert to serve as interim chair of Iowa State's Chemical Engineering department

An ISU chemical engineering professor has been appointed interim chair of his department, following nearly 20 years on faculty. Kurt Hebert will replace Charles Glatz, who has been named interim dean of the university's College of Engineering until the January arrival of Mark Kushner, the college's eighth dean.

Go to news release.

Urbandale city manager wins Iowa State University public service award

Robert Layton's career-long commitment to public service has been rewarded with a top honor from Iowa State University. The Urbandale city manager shares his sense of dedication with the award's namesake, ISU alumnus Dwight Ink, who served every U.S. president from Eisenhower through Reagan.

Go to news release.

Iowa State's College of Business names new faculty fellows

The College of Business has created five new faculty fellowships -- four in the marketing department and one in the logistics, operations and management information systems department. The fellowships help the college maintain competitive faculty salaries and provide professional development resources.

Go to news release.

ISU athletics director appointment extended

Athletics Director Bruce Van De Velde's employment agreement has been extended. After his contract expires in June 2005, he'll become an "exempt Professional and Scientific" employee, which is consistent with that of other senior administrators who report to President Gregory Geoffroy.

Go to news release.

Iowa State experts can comment on mad cow disease

A veterinarian and a livestock market economist are among the Iowa State University experts who can provide perspective on the latest developments in mad cow disease. On June 25, USDA reported that a cattle carcass had tested as "inconclusive" for mad cow disease. A follow-up test at a USDA laboratory in Ames found no sign of the disease, USDA said June 30. Test results on a second carcass, singled out on June 29 as possibly being infected, will not be available for several days.

Go to news release.

Business faculty using human computer
interaction equipment

Business faculty are shown instructing a student in human computer interaction. This photo was featured in BizEd magazine and received a first place award in the science and research category for photographer Bob Elbert in University Photographers' Association of America competition.

ISU in the news

Preparing to leave

Fox News channel

Indications are that President George Bush has begun working up to the moment when the United States moves toward leaving Baghdad.

A government in exit mode engages in "the so-called Vietnamization process." Major decisions about security are left to local officials or the incoming leadership, with offers to help when needed.

"That was the classic part of the exit strategy that the Nixon administration tried" in Vietnam. "We're seeing some of that, but the problem is the Iraqi security forces are not sufficiently developed for that turnover to take place."

-- James McCormick, political science chairman

See article.

A hard bargain

Baltimore Sun

Anti-Wal-Mart sentiment hasn't seemed to stop the company's exponential growth. The company some people love to hate serves 138 million customers per week and boasted sales of $256 billion last year.

"It's hip to say you hate Wal-Mart, but I don't really think there is as much hate as you think. As big as they are and moving as fast as they are, they are going to be a viable company for a long time."

-- Ken Stone, ISU Extension economist and emeritus professor, ag economics

See article