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News

William Robinson named Iowa State University Distinguished Arts and Humanities Scholar

William Robinson, professor of philosophy, has been named Iowa State University's 2004-05 Distinguished Arts and Humanities Scholar by the university's Center for Excellence in the Arts and Humanities. Robinson will receive a semester free from teaching responsibilities to work on scholarly research. He will present a lecture on his work during the 2005 fall semester.

See news release.

 

Karol DeWulf NickellNickell

Better Homes and Gardens editor is 2004 Schwartz Award winner

Karol DeWulf Nickell, vice president and editor-in-chief of Better Homes and Gardens magazine, is the recipient of the 2004 James W. Schwartz Award for Distinguished Service to Journalism and Communication. It is the highest honor conferred by Iowa State University's Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication.

See news release.

ISU College of Veterinary Medicine will hold first White Coat Ceremony, Aug. 20

The incoming class of Iowa State University's College of Veterinary Medicine will be "coated" Friday in a White Coat Ceremony, a rite of passage common to medical professions. This is the first year the ISU college has held the ceremony, which is a tradition in many colleges of medicine, pharmacy and veterinary medicine

See news release.

 

Lynnette PohlmanPohlman

Pohlman to receive ISU College of Design's Christian Petersen Award

Lynette Pohlman, who has preserved the legacy and art work of Christian Petersen at Iowa State, will receive the College of Design's Christian Petersen Award on Monday. The college's highest award recognizes Pohlman's leadership in establishing the arts as an integral part of the ISU culture. Pohlman is director and curator of University Museums.

See news release.

Iowa State University Organizes Workshops on Water, Wastewater Treatment Practices

Iowa State staff members will travel around the state in the next few weeks to share information about water and wastewater management practices in Iowa industries. The free, half-day workshops will be held in Marion, Bettendorf, Sioux City and Des Moines.

See news release.

Iowa State foreign languages professor receives National Endowment for the Humanities grant

Aili Mu, assistant professor of foreign languages and literatures at Iowa State University, has been awarded a $75,000 National Endowment for the Humanities grant to study Chinese "Short-short" stories. "Short-short" stories are a subgenre of Chinese fiction about 1,500 to 3,000 (Chinese) characters in length. Mu shares the grant with professors from Notre Dame University, Notre Dame, Ind., and Lingnam University, Hong Kong.

See news release.

Cael makes Vanity Fair

Iowa State standout and Olympic wrestler Cael Sanderson is featured, along with other U.S. Olympians, in a special collectors' edition of Vanity Fair magazine. The September issue is currently on newsstands.

ISU alumni named poet laureate

Iowa native and 1962 Iowa State graduate Ted Kooser recently was named the next poet laureate of the United States. CBS News.

ISU ag engineer's award-winning design advances fertilizer application technology

One of the year's best new technologies in agriculture was designed by a team led by ISU Extension ag engineer Mark Hanna. The Impellicone is a fertilizer application system that has the potential to reduce the amount of ammonia typically used on crops. The American Society of Agricultural Engineers gave it their top technology award.

See news release.

ISU chemistry professor elected to International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science

Mark Gordon, Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences and professor of chemistry, has been recognized by the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science for his innovative work in the development and application of new methods in scalable electronic structure theory.

See news release.

Youngsters with their Cyclone tattoos

Showing their colors

Youngsters show their freshly applied Cyclone tattoos at the university's state fair exhibit. On display at the exhibit this year are sculptures from the ISU campus. The fair runs through Aug. 22. See news release.

On the election

Patricia Hamm Hamm

"Judging from their behavior, both Republican and Democrat strategists think that, once again, absentee voting, especially from abroad, is bound to play a key role in the 2004 presidential election, as it did in 2000," said ISU political scientist Patricia Hamm. "The vote of approximately 7 million American expatriates has become one of the most coveted, which is why Republicans and Democrats alike, including the Kerry and the Bush sisters, and nephew George P. Bush, are busy courting them in places like Mexico City, where about 700,000 Americans live."

Robert Baum Baum

"The challenge for George W. Bush and the Republican Party is to convince voters that their emphasis on faith is not meant to divide or exclude people," says ISU associate professor of philosophy and religious studies Robert Baum, "or to remove the separation of church and state that has guided this country since the time of Jefferson."

Daniela Dimitrova Dimitrova

"The Internet has become vital to the 2004 campaign giving both parties access to information and ideas not provided by the big national media," says ISU political scientist Daniela Dimitrova. "For instance, the Internet is an important source of information on the Iraq War. Americans holding negative views toward the war have been particularly motivated to go online and seek alternative views. Blog sites such as 'Where is Raed' is a good example."

ISU political experts on election year issues.

Steffen Schmidt Schmidt

"This is a crucial moment for the Democratic Party as it tries to re-gain its reputation on defense and domestic security and, in a sense, recapture the American flag from the Republicans," says ISU political scientist Steffen Schmidt. "Both defense and security are top priority issues on American's minds."

ISU political experts on election year issues.

James McCormick McCormick

"States like Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Ohio are crucial to the selection of the next president," says ISU political scientist James McCormick. "As the Midwest goes, so goes the presidency."

ISU political experts on election year issues.

Robert Lowry Lowry

"2004 is already the longest, most expensive presidential campaign in history," says ISU political scientist Robert Lowry. "This is likely a sign of things to come."

ISU political experts on election year issues.

Kim Conger Conger

"Evangelical voter turnout will be a big question for the GOP in the 2004 election," says ISU political scientist Kim Conger. "The party that turns out its base will be in the best position to capitalize on the swing voters they can attract."

ISU political experts on election year issues.

Ray Dearin Dearin

"Since Richard Nixon in 1960, it has been customary for nomination accepters in both parties to include in their speeches 'personal vision statements' of the American dream," says ISU political scientist Ray Dearin. "Republicans have stressed the pioneer, individual liberty, and 'opportunity society'; Democrats have leaned toward the immigrant, 'huddled masses,' and communitarian version. Expect this trend to continue in New York."

ISU political experts on election year issues.

Dianne Bystrom Bystrom

"The Bush/Cheney campaign is doing more than it did four years ago to try to win the women's vote," says ISU political scientist Dianne Bystrom. "This includes a greater reliance on the president's wife to campaign. For example, she is featured in an ad on the Bush campaign's Web site devoted to women, talking about the administration's record on education."

ISU political experts on election year issues.

ISU in the news

Candidates jockey for women's vote

Quad-City Times

The Bush presidential campaign is doing more than it did four years ago to try to win the women's vote, says Dianne Bystrom, director of ISU's Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics. That includes a higher profile for First Lady Laura Bush, who is featured in the campaign's new web site devoted to women and talks about the administration's record on education.

See article.

13 ways to live on less

MSN Money

Every dollar you spend has consequences elsewhere in your life. Choose a no-fee credit card with a rewards program and review insurance deductibles annually or semi-annually to save, says Mark Oleson, director of the Financial Counseling Clinic at Iowa State.

See article.