[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Iowa State University nameplate


News Service
Gold bar
QUICK LINKS
Today's News
News releases
ISU homepage
NEWS RELEASE

February 2001


AGRICULTURE, VETERINARY MEDICINE AND NATURAL RESOURCES NEWS FROM IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

SHOCK WAVES PROVIDE EFFECTIVE THERAPY FOR HORSES
Horse owners from throughout the Midwest are bringing their horses to Iowa State University's Veterinary Teaching Hospital for an innovative treatment that uses shock wave technology to repair bone and ligament problems. The medical technology was originally developed to break up kidney stones in humans, says Dr. Scott McClure, an assistant professor specializing in equine surgery. He is one of only two equine specialists in the United States using shock waves to treat horses. For suspensory ligament problems and other chronic conditions of the bones or ligaments, conventional therapy has either failed or worked too slowly, McClure says. He has found shock wave treatment to heal those conditions fully and much faster than conventional treatment. Rather than "breaking up" a mass, the noninvasive shock waves are applied in ways that actually remodel the bone, stimulate blood flow or cause cells to divide. Contact McClure, (515) 294-1500, or Phyllis Peters, College of Veterinary Medicine Communications, (515) 294-4602.

THE SCOOP ON MANURE AND HOW LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS HANDLE IT
A major concern in large-scale livestock production is the impact of poor manure management on water and air quality. A new survey by Iowa State's Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture looks at the attitudes and issues that influence manure management decisions of 34 central Iowa swine producers. Sociologist Clare Hinrichs says those who write environmental regulations should avoid "one-size-fits-all" solutions because many factors enter into a farmer's decisions about manure management. Contact Hinrichs, (515) 294-5154, or Laura Miller, Leopold Center Communications, (515) 294-5272.

YOUR WOODEN SANTA'S A GONER, AND OTHER PLANT CLINIC DIAGNOSES
Sometimes peace of mind is what Iowa State's Plant Disease Clinic provides to its clients. No, those suspicious-looking flecks scattered in your lawn aren't fallout of some sort, they're just sawdust from a nearby sawmill. And sometimes the clinic must confirm the worst: Yes, that mushroom growing on your wooden Santa Claus is, in fact, a fungus that is making the decoration fall apart. Those are two of the more unusual cases handled in the past year by the clinic, which diagnoses problems and suggests solutions for Iowa's green thumbs. "Many plant samples we receive don't show evidence of infectious disease," said Paula Flynn, the clinic's diagnostician. "Often the symptoms are related to site or environmental stresses, not disease. Knowing the circumstances, we can help predict whether the plant will recover or not." Last year the clinic received more than 1,500 plant samples for diagnosis and nearly 1,500 soil samples for soybean cyst nematode testing. Plant samples came from 97 counties; 53 came from other states. For more information on how to correctly submit plant samples to ISU's Plant Disease Clinic, contact your county extension office or call (515) 294-0581. Contact Flynn, (515) 294-0581, or Brian Meyer, Agriculture Communications, (515) 294-706.

AG FORUM: DEMANDING CONSUMERS, INNOVATIVE ANSWERS
On March 2, Iowa State's Center for Agricultural and Rural Development's 2001 Agricultural Forum will examine the effects of new consumer demands on food retailers, processors and producers during their conference, "Extreme Demands-Extraordinary Products." John McManus, associate publisher of American Demographics magazine, will give a presentation on future food trends. Other speakers include Ric Jurgens, Hy-Vee executive vice president; Michael Mackenzie, former director general of the Food and Drink Federation of the United Kingdom; Larry Bohlen, director of health and environment programs at Friends of the Earth (the group that detected the presence of StarLink corn in taco shells); and Jim Geist, executive director of Identity Preserved International and Colorado SweetGold Corn. Registration is $90. Registration and program information are available on the Web at http://www.agforum.org, or by calling (515) 294-6257. Contact Bruce Babcock, CARD, (515) 294-6758; Sandy Clarke, CARD, (515) 294-6257; or Brian Meyer, Agriculture Communications, (515) 294-0706.

WATER QUALITY AND AGRICULTURE CONFERENCE MARCH 5-7 AT ISU
Water quality will be the topic of "Agriculture and the Environment: State and Federal Water Initiatives," March 5-7 at Iowa State University. The conference will examine agriculture's impact on water quality and will include discussion of policies which may impact watershed management. Sponsors are Iowa State's College of Agriculture, ISU Extension, the Iowa State Water Resources Research Institute, the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. More information is available on the conference Web site at: http://extension.agron.iastate.edu/aged/water_quality/MainWQ/wqm.htm. Contact Gerald Miller, Agriculture, (515) 294-4333, or Barb McManus, Agriculture Communications, (515) 294-0707.

IOWA GRAIN QUALITY INITIATIVE PLANS BIOTECH GRAIN MEETING
Crop growers can learn more about current global market actions on genetically modified grains at "Biotech Grains Pre-planting Update," a meeting at Iowa State University that will be broadcast to more than 20 sites in the Iowa Communications Network. Producers can find out their options for growing biotech products that have not received approval worldwide. The meeting also will include information on marketing and approval, channeling and retail issues, agronomics, analytical and handling issues, perspectives of intermediate and end users of biotech grains, contract interpretation, and legal issues. The conference is organized by the Iowa Grain Quality Initiative, a grain research and information program at Iowa State. More information is available on the Web at http://www.iowagrain.org. Contact Darren Jarboe, Iowa Grain Quality Initiative, (515) 294-3137, or Melea Reicks Licht, Agriculture Communications, (515) 294-2957.

ADVANCED SWINE REPRODUCTIVE MANAGEMENT SEMINARS SCHEDULED The Iowa Pork Industry Center will present advanced swine reproductive management seminars in Mason City, Winthrop, Kalona and Lewis, March 26-29. The one-day programs will feature John Mabry and Tom Baas, Iowa State University breeding and genetics specialists, and Don Levis, reproductive management specialist from the University of Nebraska. The tentative agenda includes sessions on how to avoid the summer slump in conception rates, boar fertility, financial and production impacts of new reproductive technology, artificial insemination to make genetic progress and a review of emerging reproductive technologies. ISU Extension livestock field specialists are coordinating the programs and will present information during the seminars. Registration before March 19 is $35 and includes lunch. Registration at the door is $45 and meal availability is not guaranteed. For more information, contact John Mabry, (515) 294-6325, or Sherry Hoyer, Iowa Pork Industry Center Communications, (515) 294-4496.

SWINE NUTRITION UPDATE BROADCAST ON ICN MARCH 26
The Iowa Pork Industry Center at Iowa State University will present "Food for Thought on Feeding for Profit," a swine nutrition update program, on the Iowa Communications Network, 7:30 to 9 p.m., March 26. Sessions include an overview of current ISU swine nutrition research, meat quality issues relating to the use of Paylean, implications of using Paylean in diets of animals for 4-H/FFA exhibition, fiber in gestation diets and using phytase to reduce phosphorus levels in manure. The program is free and no pre-registration is required. A link to approved ICN sites is on the Web at http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ipic/events.html. Contact Larry McMullen, ISU Extension, (319) 462-2791, or Sherry Hoyer, Iowa Pork Industry Center Communications, (515) 294-4496.

LEOPOLD CENTER LOOKS TO THE FUTURE
New ways of thinking about agriculture must involve public policy and economic practices, a better understanding of local ecosystems, new markets for Iowa farmers, and partnerships with consumers, says Fred Kirschenmann, director of the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State. After nearly a year of discussion, plans for future work of the Leopold Center will be the topic of several "community conversations" throughout Iowa in February and March. A summary of future directions for the Leopold Center Building a New Agriculture for Iowa and details about the community conversations are posted at the center's Web site, http://www.leopold.iastate.edu. Contact Kirschenmann, (515) 294-3711, or Laura Miller, Leopold Center Communications, (515) 294-5272.

GAINING INSIGHT FROM SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE'S HISTORY
The history of sustainable agriculture efforts in Iowa is the subject of a lecture by John Pesek, retired Iowa State professor of agronomy. Pesek takes a really long view of agricultureto more than 10,000 years ago for insight into today's problems. The text of his lecture will be available by March 1 from the Henry A. Wallace Endowed Chair for Sustainable Agriculture office, (515) 294-6061, or on the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture's Web site at http://www.leopold.iastate.edu. Contact Pesek, (515) 294-2150; Gretchen Zdorkowski, Wallace Chair office, (515) 294-6061; or Laura Miller, Leopold Center Communications, (515) 294-5272

-30-


Iowa State University
... Becoming the Best
Ames, Iowa 50011, (515) 294-4111
Published by: University Relations, online@iastate.edu
Copyright © 1995-2000, Iowa State University. All rights reserved.