From left to right: a 550 gr original Sharps long range bullet made of 16:1 lead:tin alloy, and three swaged  replicas.  Note how the patch is folded under the base of the bullet on the right.  This is always preferred to the twisted-tail method.

Making, Loading, Shooting, and Hunting with Paper Patched Bullets

I make and use Paper Patched Bullets for elk hunting and target shooting.  They are made with swaging dies and a presses made by Richard Corbin or David Corbin (two entirely different companies) using extruded, pure lead wire or soft alloy cast lead cores. The 45 caliber bullets shot from my .45-100 Shiloh Sharps exclusively with black powder. While it has once or twice been said that any gunpowder other than black powder is just a passing fad, the same is true of any bullet that is not paper patched.  Sixty million dead buffalo and countless elk, antelope, deer, etc. prove it.  So, catch up to the technology of the 19th century.  It is now the 21st century, and you are falling further and further behind.  There ain't much time left.  

To begin, there are three types of paper-patched bullets (let's call them PPB's for short). The Chase patch and the crosspatch methods are strictly for breach-seated cartridge target rifles or for muzzle loading target rifles equipped with false-muzzles. I only use the third and most common method, the twice-wrapped bullet that is seated into a brass cartridge. This type of bullet was used by buffalo hunters 130 years ago, and works just as well today as it did back then. It is the ultimate hunting bullet in my opinion, but if you don't believe me, ask the New Mexican elk in the photo to the left or read Paul Matthews' book "The Paper Jacket." It is, by far, the best reference book you can get on paper patching.

In the meantime, what I have tried to do here is to provide a series of short chapters on the various aspects of using the paper patched bullet.  Click through them as listed on the left hand side of page.  If you have any suggestions or experiences you would like to share, I would be happy to hear about them.  I learned most of this with a lot of help from a lot of other people, but there is a whole lot more to learn.  So, give a shout if you want to talk bullets.