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Dr. Greg R. Luecke

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Contact Information:

2016 Black Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames, IA 50011

phone: 515.294.5916

grluecke@iastate.edu

 

Dr. Greg Luecke is an Associate Professor at Iowa State University in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. He earned his BSME from University of Missouri-Columbia in 1979, and worked in the aerospace industry in electro-hydraulic flight controls at McDonnell-Douglas Corp and Sikorsky Aircraft for ten years before pursuing a career in teaching and research. He earned an MS degree from Yale University in 1986 and his PhD in Mechanical Engineering at Pennsylvania State University in 1992.

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To see a movie of this VR technology, press here.

Dr. Luecke's research in robotics, systems, and controls began at ISU in 1992, when he joined the faculty in the Mechanical Engineering Department. He is currently an Associate Professor, and his work deals with the analysis, modeling, and simulation of dynamic systems, from robotic manipulators to Virtual Reality. The major emphasis is to develop accurate simulations tools for use in real-time computation and human-computer interfacing in mechatronic systems.

Dr. Luecke is a faculty fellow of the Virtual Reality Application Center (VRAC) and is the director of the Laboratory for Advanced Robotics and Computer Control (LARCC).  He holds Courtesy Appointments in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering.

Along with his extensive industry experience, he is a licensed Professional Engineer in the State of Iowa (#14068) and the State of Maine (#12175).

Dr. Luecke's area of research is in Robotics, Dynamic Systems, and Controls. All of these elements are used in the development of Haptic Feedback for virtual reality.   The picture above is an example of the use of a PUMA as a haptic force display.