Landscape Inventory and Analysis

LA 361

Paul F. Anderson


Project Links


Read the Des Moines Register editorial about our Loess Hills national park site selection project.

 

 

 

 

 

lc361web.jpg (184872 bytes)ArcView GIS land cover map of the Des Moines River valley between Fort Dodge and Brushy Creek, Webster County, Iowa
Project 3 -- Photo interpretation and land cover map
Project 9 -- Data digitizing and debugging
Spring 2001

 

lc361luc.jpg (195516 bytes)ArcView GIS land cover map of the Chariton River valley area, Lucas County, Iowa
Project 3 -- Photo interpretation and land cover map
Project 9 -- Data digitizing and debugging
Spring 2000

 

ArcView GIS land cover map of the Des Moines River Valley Area, Boone County, IowaArcView GIS land cover map of the Des Moines River valley area, Boone County, Iowa
Project 3 -- Photo interpretation and land cover map
Project 9 -- Data digitizing and debugging
Spring 1999

 

ArcView GIS land cover map of the Renton Area, Seattle, WashingtonArcView GIS land cover map of the Renton area, Seattle, Washington
Project 3 -- Photo interpretation and land cover map
Project 9 -- Data digitizing and debugging
Spring 1999

 

trailcv2.jpg (171219 bytes)Recreation Trail Study, City of Fort Dodge, Webster County, Iowa
Project 2 -- Landscape inventory and interpretation
Spring 2001

 

p2buffer.jpg (140924 bytes)Riparian Buffers Study, Trees Forever, Southern Iowa
Project 2 -- Landscape inventory and interpretation
Spring 2000

 

rc&dcov2.jpg (133368 bytes)Critical Areas Study, Prairie Rivers RC&D, Central Iowa
Project 2 -- Landscape inventory and interpretation
Spring 1999

 

Final projects: environmental impact assessment
Project 12 -- Landscape impacts
Spring 2001

sum_tim.jpg (131504 bytes)sum_christa.jpg (102733 bytes)sum_erin.jpg (116818 bytes)sum_joel_marcus.jpg (214379 bytes)

sum_seth_nathan.jpg (125530 bytes)sum_Jon_BriarCliff.jpg (141125 bytes)sum_mike.jpg (131931 bytes)sum_nate_joel.jpg (233747 bytes)

Final projects: environmental impact assessment
Project 11 -- Landscape impacts
Spring 2000

sum_erickevnorm.jpg (131024 bytes)sum_geobj.jpg (272025 bytes)sum_justin.jpg (226330 bytes)sum_lukebutch.jpg (200309 bytes)

SUM_ryanryan.jpg (209165 bytes)sum_seanajosh.jpg (175048 bytes)sum_wesshasco.jpg (189634 bytes)

Final projects: environmental impact assessment
Project 11 -- Landscape impacts
Spring 1999

361barbm.jpg (141572 bytes)361brian.jpg (206929 bytes)361heath.gif (27704 bytes)361chris.gif (71461 bytes)

361kenjo.jpg (205420 bytes)361laura.gif (45030 bytes)361matal.gif (164201 bytes)361robpa.jpg (186574 bytes)


COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES

Landscape Inventory and Analysis is an intermediate level course in landscape planning emphasizing landscape patterns, landscape data sources, landscape analysis techniques, and geographic information systems (GIS). Landscape planning involves landscape architects and other professionals concerned about the location, kind, and quality of land use. Landscape planning emphasizes the following:

  • Biological, physical, and social considerations (especially natural and cultural resources)
  • Principles of landscape ecology (such as biodiversity, ecological integrity, and sustainability)
  • Predominantly rural study areas (such as watersheds, state forests, and countryside)
  • Regional-level studies (relatively large study areas)
  • Two-dimensional planning (rather than three-dimensional design)

Part of the landscape planning process involves landscape analysis. Landscape analysis provides a systematic approach to developing comprehensive, accurate, and efficient information about land and its resources. The purpose of landscape analysis is to develop useful information prior to land use decision-making and site development planning. This is accomplished primarily by identifying opportunities and limitations for landscape development, restoration, conservation, or preservation. Applications of landscape analysis include the following:

  • Landscape description (inventory, regional delineation)
  • Location analysis (site selection, route selection)
  • Use analysis (suitability, capability, feasibility studies)
  • Impact analysis (urban development, resource use)

In preparing you to work on landscape planning projects, we will answer the following questions:

  • What information do I need?
  • What data sources are available?
  • Where do I get the pertinent data?
  • How do I analyze the data to create useful information?

During the course you will work on developing the following skills:

  • Analysis (problem identification, key factors, inventory, synthesis)
  • Evaluation (selection of criteria, impact assessment, precognition)
  • Communication (oral, written, graphic)
  • Technical (cartography, data interpretation, computer applications, GIS)

At the conclusion of the course you should have the ability to apply the following landscape analysis process:

  • Define and organize a landscape planning project
  • Identify key factors or issues in the project
  • Inventory relevant landscape data sources
  • Define appropriate project goals and objectives
  • Develop alternate sets of analysis criteria
  • Select appropriate spatial analysis techniques
  • Apply criteria to data using a geographic information system (GIS)
  • Evaluate analysis results in terms of your stated goals/objectives
  • Communicate your analysis results in graphic, written, and oral forms


COURSE POLICIES

Attendance

All scheduled class periods will be used. Lectures will be used to present case studies, discuss data sources and methods, and introduce projects. Studios will be used to practice methods, data interpretations, and applications. Many studio projects must be completed in class because of special methods, equipment, or group projects. Be there. No one who misses class regularly should expect to receive a passing grade.

Students on the class list who do not attend one of the first two class sessions will be dropped from the course. Students not on the class list who want to add the course should talk to us. Admission will be based on (1) prerequisites, (2) space available, and (3) first come--first served.

Grading

We use a plus-minus grading system. Your graded work includes in-studio exercises, projects outside of class, presentations, and exams. In addition to this graded work, your final grade will include your attitude, attendance, and improvement. Each assignment will have an established due date. Late work involving presentations will not be accepted. Late work involving writing will be accepted; however, the maximum possible points will be lowered according to the following schedule:

same day     -10% (of maximum possible points)
1 day        -20%
2-3 days     -30%
4-7 days     -40%
8-14 days    -50%
15-45 days   -60%
46-70 days   -70%
71-120 days  -80%

Late work that involves presentations will not be accepted. Makeup exams will be available only to those who make arrangements before the scheduled exam. We also use a point system for graded work. During the semester there will be a total of approximately 500 maximum possible points. The number of points assigned to each problem indicates its relative importance in determining your final grade. See the course outline for the relative importance of each project.

Course Text

You are required to purchase a course packet. The course packet contains course information, lecture outlines, project statements, project worksheets, and handouts.

Course Fee

The course fee includes $15.00 for the computer handouts, diskette, field trip, base sheets, aerial photographs, coding materials that you use and keep. You will be billed for the course fee by the University Business Office. Fees must be paid to receive a grade for the course.

Course Materials

Materials and equipment which you will need early in the semester include the following:

Engineer's scale        Drafting tape
T-square, triangles     Prismacolor pencils or studio markers
Lettering guide         Matte knife
White tracing paper     Illustration board

Later in the semester you will need the following materials/equipment:

Illustration board
Transparency material (flimsy, acetate, mylar, or vellum)
Transparency drawing media (markers, pencils, or ink)

We will supply some materials and equipment. Other materials or drawing equipment not listed above may be needed. We will inform you of these in advance.


SCHEDULE

Landscape description

Jan 9 Applications and issues
Jan 11 Landscape planning
Project 1. Landscape patterns (10%)

Jan 16 Landscape data
Jan 18 Landscape data

Site selection

Jan 23 Landscape data
Jan 25 Landscape data
Project 2. Inventory and interpretation (20%)

Jan 30 Landscape data
Feb 1 Landscape data

Feb 6 Landscape data
Feb 8  Presentation

Site suitability

Feb 13 Remote sensing
Feb 15 Synthesis
Project 3. Photo interpretation and land cover map (4%)

Feb 20 Geographic information systems
Feb 22 Hand-drawn datafiles
Project 4. GIS overlay suitability map (4%)

Feb 27 Transparent overlays
Mar 1 Hand-drawn datafiles
Project 5. GIS advanced suitability maps (4%)

Mar 6 Analysis principles
Project 6. GIS urban park suitability (4%)
Mar 8 Exam
Project 7. Exam (10%)

Mar 13 Spring break
Mar 15 Spring break

Mar 20 Geographic information systems
Project 8. GIS topographic modeling (5%)
Mar 22 Geographic information systems

Mar 27 Computer techniques
Project 9. GIS land cover digitizing (3%)
Mar 29 Computer techniques
Project 10. GIS land cover inventory (2%)

Impact assessment

Apr 3 Impact assessment
Project 11. EIS evaluation (5%)
Apr 5 Impact statements
Project 12. Impact assessment (20%)

Apr 10 Assessment techniques
Apr 12 Impact mitigation

Apr 17 Selecting analysis techniques
Apr 19 Exam
Project 13. Exam (10%)

Apr 24 Jury week
Apr 26 Final presentation


BIBLIOGRAPHY

On Reserve

McHarg, Ian. 1971 (1995). Design with Nature. Doubleday (Wiley), New York.

References

Allen, Kathleen M.S., and others. 1990. Interpreting Space: GIS and Archaeology. Taylor and Francis, London.

Battaille, Gretchen, David M. Gradwohl, and Charles L.P. Silet. 1978. Worlds between Two Rivers: Perspectives on American Indians in Iowa. Iowa State University Press, Ames.

Burrough, P.A. 1986. Principles of Geographical Information Systems for Land Resources Assessment. Clarendon Press, Oxford.

Burrough, P.A. and Rachel McDonnell. 1998. Principles of Geographical Information Systems. Oxford University Press, New York.

Canter, Larry W. 1977. Environmental Impact Assessment. McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York.

Clark, Ray, and Larry W. Canter. 1997. Environmental Policy and NEPA. St. Lucie Press, Boca Raton.

Clarke, Keith C. 1997. Getting Started with Geographic Information Systems. Prentice-Hall.

Cooper, Tom C. 1982. Iowa's Natural Heritage. Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation, Des Moines.

DeChiara, Joseph and Lee E. Koppelman. 1969. Planning Design Criteria. Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York.

DeChiara, Joseph and Lee E. Koppelman. 1978. Site Planning Standards. McGraw-Hill, New York.

Dickert, Thomas G. 1974. Environmental Impact Assessment: Guidelines and Commentary. University of California Extension, Berkeley.

Dinsmore, James. 1994. A Country So Full of Game: Story of Wildlife in Iowa.U. of Iowa Press, Iowa City.

Douglas, William J. 1995. Environmental GIS: Applications to Industrial Facilities. CRC Press/Lewis Publishers, Boca Raton.

Dramstad, Wenche E., James D. Olson, and Richard T.T. Forman. 1996. Landscape Ecology Principles in Landscape Architecture and Land-Use Planning. Island Press, Washington.

Eilers, Lawrence J. and Dean M. Roosa. 1994. Vascular Plants of Iowa: an Annotated Checklist and Natural History. U. of Iowa Press, Iowa City.

Errington, Paul L. Of Men and Marshes. 1957. Iowa State University Press, Ames.

Fisher, Peter. 1995. Innovations in GIS. Taylor and Francis, London.

Forman, Richard and Michel Godron. 1986. Landscape Ecology. John Wiley and Sons, New York.

Frederick, K.D., and R.A. Sedjo. 1991. America's Renewable Resources: Historical Trends and Current Challenges. Resources for the Future, Washington, D.C.

Haines-Young, Roy, and others. 1993. Landscape Ecology and Geographic Information Systems. Taylor and Francis, London.

Heffernan, Patrick H., and Ruthann Corwin. 1975. Environment Impact Assessment. Freeman, Cooper and Co., San Francisco.

Huxhold, William E. 1991. An Introduction to Urban Geographic Information Systems. Oxford, New York.

Jensen, John R. and others. 1992. Predictive Modeling of Cattail and Waterlily Distribution in a South Carolina Reservoir. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing, Nov. 1992, Vol. LVIII, No. 11. p. 1561-71.

Joao, Elsa. 1998. Causes and Consequences of Map Generalization in GIS. Taylor and Francis, London.

Katz, Michael and Dorothy Thornton. 1996. Environmental Management Tools on the Internet. St. Lucie Press, Boca Raton.

Keller, Edward A. 1976. Environmental Geology. Merrill Publishing, Columbus, Ohio.

Land Use Analysis Laboratory. 1975. Natural Resource Analysis--Story County, Iowa. Iowa State University, Ames

Laurini, Robert, and Derek Thompson. 1992. Fundamentals of Spatial Information Systems. Academic Pr., London

Leopold, Aldo. 1949. A Sand County Almanac. Oxford University Press, London.

Lewis, Philip H. 1996. Tomorrow by Design. a Regional Design Process for Sustainability. Wiley, New York.

Lyle, John T. 1985. Design for Human Ecosystems. Van Nostrand, New York.

Lynch, Kevin. 1960. Image of the City. M.I.T. Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Lyon, John G. and Jack McCarthy. 1995. Wetland and Environmental Applications of GIS. Lewis Publishers, Boca Raton.

McNab, W. Henry and Peter E. Avers. 1994. Ecological Subregions of the United States: Section Descriptions. USDA Forest Service, Ecosystem Management, Washington, DC.

Marsh, William M. 1978. Environmental Analysis. McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York.

Marsh, William M. 1991. Landscape Planning: Environmental Applications. Wiley and Sons, New York.

Martinez-Falero, Eugenio, and Santiago Gonzales-Alonso. 1995. Quantitative Techniques in Landscape Planning. CRC Press/Lewis Publishers, Boca Raton.

Miller, E. Lynn and Sidonio Pardal. 1992. The Classic McHarg: an Interview. Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal

Miller, Michael C. 1995. Analysis of Historic Vegetation Patterns in Iowa Using Government Land Office Surveys and a Geographic Information System. MLA Thesis, Dept. of Landsape Architecture, Iowa State University, Ames.

Monmonier, Mark. 1982. Computer-Assisted Cartography: Principles and Prospects. Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ.

Monmonier, Mark. 1996. How to Lie with Maps. U. of Chicago Press.

Muschett, F. Douglas. 1997. Principles of Sustainable Development. St. Lucie Press, Boca Raton.

Mutel, Cornelia. 1989. Fragile Giants: a Natural History of the Loess Hills. University of Iowa Press, Iowa City.

Petch, James and Derek Reeve. 1998. People, Organizations, and GIS. Taylor and Francis, London.

Peuquet, Donna J. and Duane F. Marble. 1990. Introductory Readings in Geographic Information Systems. Taylor and Francis, London.

Prior, Jean C. 1992. A Regional Guide to Iowa Landforms. 2nd ed. University of Iowa Press, Iowa City.

Ripple, William J. 1987. GIS for Resource Management: a Compendium. American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. Falls Church, Virginia.

Sage, Leland. 1974. History of Iowa. Iowa State University Press, Ames.

Schweider, Dorothy. 1996. Iowa: the Middle Land. Iowa State University Press, Ames.

Scott, J. Michael. 1996. Gap Analysis: a Landscape Approach to Biodiversity Planning. Amer. Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, Bethesda, Maryland.

Simonds, John O. 1978. Earthscape: a Manual of Environmental Planning. Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York.

Smith, Daniel L., and Paul Hellmund. 1993. Ecology of Greenways. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis.

Smith, Frasier. 1997. Environmental Sustainability. St. Lucie, Press, Boca Raton.

Star, Jeffrey, and John Estes. 1990. Geographic Information Systems: An Introduction. Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ.

Steiner, Frederick. 1991. The Living Landscape: an Ecological Approach to Landscape Planning. McGraw-Hill, New York.

Steiner, Frederick and John E. Theilacker. 1984. Protecting Farmlands. AVI Publishing, Westport, Connecticut.

Sage, Leland. 1974. History of Iowa. Iowa State University Press, Ames.

Tanner, Thomas, ed. 1987. Aldo Leopold: the Man and his Legacy. Soil Conservation Society of America, Ankeny.

Thompson, George F. and Frederick R. Steiner. 1997. Ecological Planning and Design. Wiley, New York.

Thompson, Jeanette R. 1992. Prairies, Forests, and Wetlands: the Restoration of Natural Landscape Communities in Iowa. U. of Iowa Press, Iowa City.

Tomlin, C. Dana. 1990. Geographic Information Systems and Cartographic Modeling. Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ.

Tufte, Edward R. 1983. Visual Display of Quantitative Information. Graphics Press, Cheshire, Conn.

Tufte, Edward R. 1990. Envisioning Information. Graphics Press, Cheshire, Conn.

Tufte, Edward R. 1997. Visual Explanations. Graphics Press, Cheshire, Conn.

Watts, May. 1975. Reading the Landscape. Macmillan Publishing Co., New York.

Way, Douglas. 1973. Terrain Analysis. Dowden, Hutchinson, and Ross, Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania.

Williams, Edward A., and Alison K. Massa. 1983. Siting of Major Facilities. McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York.


Paul Anderson's home page

Last revision: 11 May 2001