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 GIS Descriptive Modeling of Soil Suitability for Agriculture in Iowa

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Paul F. Anderson
Iowa State University
 

Additional historical information about land sales in Polk County

The following information is from Union Historical Company.  1880.  The History of Polk County, Iowa.  Des Moines: Birdsall, Williams, and Company.  p. 656-657.  The information is now in digital form on a genealogy Web site.

FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP.

This township is six miles square and corresponds with congressional township number eighty, range twenty-two.  Skunk river crosses the township in a southwestern direction; it enters the township near the northwest corner of section three, and leaves it at the east side near the southeast corner of section twenty-four.  About one-third of the township was originally covered with timber, and owing to this fact, was a favorite part of the county at the time of the first settlement.

Trulinger's Grove, located in the south, and Lavish's Grove in the north were named respectively in honor of Eli Trulinger and Michael Lavish, two of the first settlers of the township.  This township was originally a part of Skunk township, and became a separate organization in 1856.  The following is the official record of the court ordering the organization of the township:

Whereas, At the March term of the county court of Polk county, held at Fort Des Moines during the first week of March, 1856, the courts having become satisfied from the representations of the citizens of the congressional township number eighty, north of range twenty-two, west of the fifth principal meridian, that the interests of said township required that said congressional. township should be organized for election, revenue and judicial purposes;  Therefore ordered, That said congressional township and all the territory lying within the bounds of the same, shall be so organized, and be known and hailed by the name of Franklin.  And further ordered, That Moses McClary be, and hereby, is, appointed constable for the purpose of giving notice of elections in the aforesaid township of Franklin. The first election shall be held at the house of Henry Jennings. 

This Henry Jennings, together with Ezekiel Jennings, Nathan Webb and Joseph Jones, was among the first settlers of the township.  The first settlements were made during the year 1846.  B.H. Woodward, John H. Robinson and Benjamin Robinson were also early settlers.  Franklin township is generally improved and thickly settled.  The soil is fertile and generally well cultivated.  In material prosperity it is rather above the average. The following was the value of the personal property of the township as reported by the township assessor for 1880.

ARTICLES.
Horses  496 $23,975
Mules  41 2,798
Cattle  1,608 25,485
Sheep  147 240
Swine  2,131 5,207
Vehicles  47 1,238
Money and credits 8,950
Furniture  300
Other items 1,480
Total  4,470 $69,673

 


From Union Historical Company.  1880.  The History of Polk County, Iowa.  Des Moines: Birdsall, Williams, and Company.  p. 398-400.

The following is a record of the surveys of Polk county:

Township 77, range 22; surveyed by deputy surveyor Jesse Williams; commenced October 17, 1847, and finished November 1, 1847.
Township 78, range 22; by Samuel Jacobs; commenced August 6 and finished August 21, 1847.
Township 79, range 22; by Samuel Jacobs; commenced August 22, and finished August 29, 1847.
Township 80, range 22; by John D. Evans; commenced September 16, and finished September 23, 1847.
Township 81, range 22; by John D. Evans; commenced September 8, and finished September 15, 1847.
Township 78, range 23; by Samuel W. Durham; commenced November 4, and finished November 19, 1847.
Township 79, range 23; by Samuel W. Durham; commenced September 6, and finished September 11, 1847.
Township 80, range 23; by Joseph Morehead; commenced June 25, and finished July 3, 1847.
Township 81, range 23; by Joseph Morehead; commenced September 6, and finished September 13, 1847.
Township 78, range 24; by S. W. Durham; commenced October 20, and finished November 3, 1847.
Township 79, range 24; by S. W. Durham; commenced September 13, and finished September 27, 1847.
Township 80, range 24; by Joseph Morehead; commenced July 5, and finished July 16, 1847.
Township 81, range 24; by Joseph Morehead; commenced July 17, and finished July 24, 1847.
Township 78, range 25; by S. W. Durham; commenced October 4, and finished October 19, 1847.
Township 79, range 25; by S. W. Durham; commenced September 25, and finished October 2, 1847.
Township 80, range 25; by Joseph Morehead; commenced August 25, and finished September 4, 1847.
Township 81, range 25; by Joe Morehead; commenced July 25, and finished August 5, 1847.

From the foregoing it will be seen that it required about one week to complete the survey of one township.

FIRST LAND ENTRIES

Of course no lands could be sold till they were surveyed, and as the surveys were not completed till late in the year 1847, it follows that but little land was entered prior to the year 1848.  When one township was surveyed the land in that township could be sold, and as we have already seen that the surveys were all completed during the year 1847, it follows that the lands were ready for sale in 1848.  In examining the book of original entry we were able to find but one or two entries made in 1847.  During the year 1848 considerable land was entered, though probably not so much as during the following year.  We have carefully compiled a list of all the lands entered during the first land sales, together with the date of entry and names of purchaser.  The following is the result:

TOWNSHIP 80, RANGE 22

Michael Lavish, s hf of ne qr and s hf of nw qr, sec 8, Oct 30, 1848.
Michael Lavish, ne of sw qr and n hf of se qr, sec 8, Oct 30, 1848.
Michael Lavish, nw qr of sw qr, sec 9, Oct 30, 1848.
William Frederick, sw qr, sec 23, Oct 30, 1848.
William Frederick, se qr, sec 23, Oct 30, 1848.
William Frederick, nw qr, sec 26, Oct 30, 1848.

James Monroe Gates, e hf of sw qr and w hf of se qr, sec 26, Oct 30, 1848.
William Frederick, w hf of sw qr, sec 26, Oct 30, 1848.
William Frederick, nw of se qr, and a hf of ne qr, and sw qr of ne qr, sec 27, Oct 30, 1848.
William Frederick, e hf of se qr, sec 27, Oct 30, 1848.
George Barlow, sw of se qr, see 27, Oct 30, 1848.
James Monroe Gates, ne qr, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
Eli Trullinger, nw qr, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
James Monroe Gates, nw qr, sec 35, Oct 30, 1848.

8022sold.gif (13886 bytes)

Purchaser  Hectares Acres
Lavish, M. 128.4 317.3
Frederick, W. 320.3 791.4
Barlow, G. 16.2 40.2
Trullinger, E. 65.3 161.5
Gates, J.M. 194.0 479.3
Total 724.2 1789.5

 


From Union Historical Company.  1880.  The History of Polk County, Iowa.  Des Moines: Birdsall, Williams, and Company.  p. 387-406.

CLAIM CLUBS

Some time before the lands were all surveyed and consequently before any were offered for sale, speculators from the East with plenty of money in their pockets, industriously scoured the country over, noted the most valuable portions, even though they were claims, and were prepared to give high prices for them when they came into market, thus robbing the first settlers who had borne the privations and hardships of the wilderness for several years of their lands, and whatever improvements they had put upon them. The homesteads which they had wrested from the primitive wilderness of prairie or forest and changed by enterprise and industry into

388 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

cultivated fields, laden with yellow corn or waving grain were liable to become the property of land-sharks, whose avaricious eyes saw the value of the land and cared little for justice or right; provided, themselves might secure a handsome profit. With longer purses they could afford to pay higher prices than the poor settler; while the latter sensible of their rights and aware of what labor, exposure and self-denial they had acquired these rights felt, in the view of these prospects, indignant and exasperated, and felt so justly."
Such is the account as given by Mr. Turrell in his reminiscences of early times, regarding the condition of affairs at the time the claim clubs first organize He continues:
"So highly incensed did the people become at the idea of speculators overbidding them at the land sales, that they viewed every stranger with distrust, lest his errand among them should be to note the numbers of some choice tracts, and make them his own by giving prices beyond the reach of the claimant. A unity of feeling on this subject filled the entire country. They were determined to save their claims despite any effort or intervention to the contrary, and, if possible, their intention was to pay no more than the lowest government price. Strangers passing through the country had to be careful not to meddle with the lands claimed, otherwise than honestly buying them from the possessors. If the object was thought to be different, if they were suspected of being engaged in any scheme for the unjust deprival of any settler of  what were considered his unquestionable rights, they at once incurred the hostile feeling of every inhabitant, and were not safe until they had entirely left the country.
"It soon became evident that some regular organization was needed among the settlers the better to control any outbreaks of popular rage, and cause non-residents to pay due respect to the claims which had been made, as also to prevent difficulties among the settlers themselves, the dishonest of whom did not scruple to take advantage of a neighbor's temporary absence, sickness or remoteness from aid, and jump his claim, that is, take and hold possession of it vi et armis, depriving him totally of his rights in the premises. The settlers, or citizens as they may now more properly be called, of Polk county, held a meeting to consider the proper course to pursue, and as the document which reports their proceedings is particularly interesting, we give it entire.
Through the kindness of Benj . Bryant, Esq., in whose possession it has been preserved, a copy of it has been procured for this work:
" At a public meeting of the citizens of Polk county, Iowa, held on the 8th day of April, 1848, at Fort Des Moines, W. H. Meachem was called to the chair, and L. D. Winchester elected secretary of the meeting. " The object of the meeting was then stated by the chairman to be to adopt measures for the security and protection of the citizens of said county in their claims against speculators, and all persons who may be disposed wrongfully to deprive settlers of their claims by preemption or otherwise.
" Dr. Brooks being called upon, made a speech appropriate to the occasion, as also did Mr. Myers.
" On motion of the secretary, the following gentlemen were appointed a committee to draft resolutions expressive of the sense of the meeting, to wit: Winchester, Mitchell, Scott, Sypher and Saylor.
" The committee reported the following resolutions:

389 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

1. Resolved, That we will protect all persons who do or may hold claims, against the interference of any person or persons, who shall attempt to deprive such claim-holders of their claims by preemptions or otherwise.
2. Resolved, That we will, in all cases, discountenance the speculator or other person who shall thus attempt any innovation upon the homes of the rightful settlers; that we will not hold any fellowship with such person, and that he be regarded a nuisance in the community.
3. Resolved, That no person shall be allowed to preempt or purchase in any form from the government, any land which shall be held as a claim, unless he shall first obtain the consent of the claimant.
4. Resolved, That the filing of an intention to preempt, contrary to the rights of the settler, be regarded as an attempt to wrongfully deprive the citizen of his home and his claim.
5. Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed, and that it shall be their duty to inquire into and adjust all difficulties and contentions, in cases where claims are in dispute.
6. Resolved, That it shall be the duty of said committee to notify any person who shall preempt or attempt to do so, by filing his intentions to preempt, the claim of any other person, to leave the vicinity and the county; and that they have authority to enforce a compliance with said notice.
7. Resolved, That we will sustain and uphold such committee in their decisions, and in the discharge of all their duties as defined in the foregoing resolutions.
8. Resolved, That all persons be invited to sign the foregoing resolutions, and that the signers pledge themselves to be governed by, and to aid in sustaining the same.

" The above resolutions were unanimously adopted.
" On motion, the following named gentlemen were appointed a committee to adjust claims: J. B. Scott, John Saylor, P. Fagan, Thomas Mitchell and Thomas Henderson.
" On motion, the meeting adjourned.
" W. H. MEACHEM. Chairman.
" L. D. WINCHESTER, Secretary."'
The resolutions were signed by the following named persons:

W. H. MEACHEM N. REEVES.
J. B. SCOTT WM. COOPER.
P. B. FAGAN JOHN MCMAHAN.
T. HENDERSON Wm.' HUGHES.
T. CRABTREE A. L. DEAN.
W. A. SCOTT P. WEAR.
W. WEAR E. KEELER.
JOHN MYERS JAMES ANDERSON.
T. MCCALL J. CHURCH.
J. THOMPSON H. EVERLY.
Wm. BRADFORD C. B. MYERS
N. BALL D. L. JEWETT.
J. BUNDRUIN DAVID NORRIS.
JOSEPH DEFORD Wm. BUSIC, JR.

389a

J. M. KIRKBRIDE CHAS. KURVEY.
JOHN SAYLOR B. A. HARBAN.
JOHN HAYES J. D. MCGLOTHLIN.
J. H. FINCH Wm. LOWER.
P. NEWCOMER JACOB BAYCUS.
DAYTON HARRIS SOLOMON BALES.
JOHN BENNETT GEO. DAILY.
D. S. COCKERHAM L. GARRETT.
BENJ. BENNETT A. N. HAYES.
J. T. THOMPSON G. W. LACY.

390 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

GEORGE KNOOP T. K. BROOKS.
ASA FLEMMING JOSEPH MYERS.
THOS. GILPIN J. TRIBES.
JOHN MILLER J. G. TUTTLE.
D. S. BOWMAN B. PERKINS.
CHARLES MURROW JACOB WINTER.
ROBT. HOPKINS D. HAWORTH.
JOSEPH KEENEY S. W. MCCALL.
JAMES PHILLIPS MONTGOMERY MCCALL.
L. D. WINCHESTER A. W. HOBSON.
JOHN SAYLOR B. F. FREDERICK.
T. MITCHELL Wm. BUSIC, SR.
BENJ. SAYLOR E. COMPTON.
H. D. HENDRICKS JOHN WILDY
T. CAMPBELL J. HARRIS.
G. MAGINNISS H. HUNTINGTON.
J. C. JONES JOHN BAIRD.
J. FREDERICK W. B. BINTE.
R. W. SYPHER B. J. SAYLOR.
SAML. KELLOGG GEORGE KRYSHER.
WM. GARRETT C. STUTSMAN.
W. F. AYERS D. S. MEARTS.
JOHN S. DEAN C. S. EVANS.
ELI KEELER DAVID MILLER.
GEORGE OGLEVIE JAMES McROBERTS.
Wm. KUREN FRANKLIN NAGLE.

Several other meetings followed this first one throughout the summer of 1848, and the last one was held during the same year just a short time before the land sales began at Iowa City. This meeting was an immense affair, its chief object being to elect a bidder to attend the sales. R. L. Tidrick was elected bidder, and a platoon of men were selected from the club whose duty it was to thoroughly arm themselves and accompany the bidder in the capacity of an escort. Mr. Tidrick and his bodyguard attended the sales, and such a formidable array did they present that the rights of the settlers were not interfered with. The claims were ultimately secured at the minimum price of $1.25 per acre, and the matter was as a general thing finally adjusted amicably. There were, however, a few instances in which difficulties sprung up that were not so amicably adjusted. We reproduce two incidents of this character as related by Mr. Turrell in his reminiscences.
"In the Spring of 1849 occurred what was called the Flemming and Perkins difficulties which, arising from a subject particularly relating to the settlers, threatened for a time to prove very serious. The difficulty at first sprung from a contention about land. Asa Flemming had made a claim a few miles below Des Moines, and B. Perkins, a neighbor, endeavored to preempt it, and had actually filed his intention to that effect. Perkins' fraudulent scheme being discovered caused

390a

a great excitement in the vicinity, and many and dire were the imprecations invoked upon his head. It was also rumored that one Holland had been a partner of Perkins in the movement, and was to furnish the money with which to obtain the patent

391 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

from the United States, but the truth of this report was never fully substantiated.
"Perkins and Flemming were both members of the claim club, whose rules and regulations have already been given, and this circumstance proving fully the perfidious character of the former, enlisted an additional hatred against him. Non-residents and strangers, the settlers expected, would encroach upon their rights. Such they were vigorously watching, and were prepared to counteract and resist any innovations from such sources; but that one of their own citizens-one who was a member of an organization for the mutual protection of all-who had bound himself to abide by the club laws, and whose interests if jeopardized would have been amply guarded from danger would prove recreant to every sentiment of integrity, justice and honor, was unthought of, unexpected, and therefore the more condemned and detested. Under the circumstances Flemming easily succeeded in effecting a combination of the settlers residing near him for the protection of his claim, and to administer exemplary punishment to Perkins. The members of the claim club were all ready to assist, for the interests of one were the interests of the whole community. If Perkins should succeed in his plans others would follow his example; a claim would soon be of no value, and a general disturbance arose throughout the whole country. Mr. Perkins being found one day in the vicinity of the claim in dispute, the settlers, led by Flemming, resolved to wreak their vengeance upon him, and armed and equipped themselves for that purpose. Perkins, however, became aware of their plans before they could secure him, and on their approach stood not upon the order of his going, but mounted a horse and fled at once. Several shots were fired at him without effect, and the terrified fugitive flying for his life,

'Stayed not for brake, and he stopped not for stone,'

until he arrived at Fort Des Moines. With a horse covered with sweat and trembling with fatigue, himself without a hat or coat and almost frantic with the delusion that his pursuers were close upon him, he reached the Raccoon ferry, and eagerly besought the ferryman, Alex. Scott, to lose not a moment in crossing him over the ferry into town, where he hoped to find a secure asylum from his bloodthirsty enemies.
"Safely ensconced in Fort Des Moines, Perkins in a few days recovered from his recent fright, and growing valorous at the abuse of his foes, and the distance from anger, contrary to the advice of his friends, swore out a warrant for the arrest of Flemming, whom only he could identify, charging him with shooting with intent to kill. Flemming was subsequently arrested by George Michael, a constable, and brought before Benj. Luce, Esq., for examination. Luce's office was in a building formerly a part of the Fort, situated near the Point. Its site is at present occupied by a German grocery.
"While Flemming was upon his trial a mob of his friends armed to the teeth, surrounded and broke into the office, carrying away the prisoner by main force and bidding defiance to the authorities. Resistance to this mob was not for a moment thought of. Probably the unfavorable opinion entertained for Perkins by the citizens of Fort Des Moines led them to look more leniently upon so dangerous a proceeding; but it is more likely that

392 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY.

the absence of force on the side of the law and the suddenness of the attack rendered any opposition unavailing, and, therefore, was not attempted. Flemming, rescued from the bonds of the law, was triumphantly escorted to his home with every demonstration of success and exultation."
"He was afterward re-arrested, and again did the mob endeavor to rescue him, but their presence was expected. When some eighty of these were seen on the other side of the Raccoon river, brandishing their weapons and loudly calling for the ferryboat to take them over, the good people of Des Moines grew nervous with excitement, and nothing less than a battle was expected. James Phillips, then coroner, but in the delirium of the exciting crisis, and doubtless over-stimulated by a few extra potations of brandy, styling himself a major in the army of the United States, proclaimed martial law in the town, and went around to all the stores, commanding the proprietors to lock up their houses in order to save their goods from pillage, arm themselves and be ready to act under orders. Many of them did so. A large crowd collected at the Point' where the band of insurgents could be plainly seen, endeavoring to gain passage over the stream, and could be heard uttering loud threats against every power, judicial, executive and military in fort Des Moines."
" But by the coolness and intrepedity of Alex. Scott, the ferryman, their riotous project was completely frustrated. He calmly and firmly refused to take them over unless they unarmed themselves. They stormed, cursed, threatened, but not an inch would he let the boat go until they stacked their arms, and laid aside every offensive weapon. Unmoved by their threats and unprovoked by their maledictions, Scott resolutely adhered to his purpose, and finally the mob sullenly stacked their arms, and then, and not till then, were they ferried across the Raccoon."
" Armed intervention was no longer practicable, and Flemming was examined, the charge found true and he was obliged to give bonds for his appearance at the next term of the district court. However, he finally escaped as the grand jury failed to indict him. Perkins found his conduct, in reference to preempting Flemming's land, so universally condemned, and himself an object of such general detestation, that he was glad to execute to Flemming a bond, in which it was stipulated that the latter should have a warranty deed for the claim in dispute, so soon as a patent could be procured from the government, upon paying to Perkins the sum of one dollar and twenty-five cents an acre. The execution of this bond ended all persecution, suits and riots in the case, but Perkins was but little esteemed ever afterward."
The account of the Holland difficulty as related by Mr. Turrell is as follows " Holland was trading through the country, stopping at various places where his business demanded, and among the rest at Fort Des Moines. While here some malicious person reported that he was a speculator, and was engaged in selecting choice claims, which he intended to purchase. He was also suspected of being connected with Perkins in his attempted frauds. These statements, although false as far as is known, being spread far and wide among the settlers, caused no little excitement, and their exasperation soon raised to that pitch that a crowd of them resolved to give Mr. Holland a sample of pioneer justice, in the prompt application of that notorious branch of jurisprudence which Judge Lynch has the merit of introducing. Holland was made aware of the inhospitable intention, but he took it very

HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY. 393

coolly, manifesting no uneasiness whatever. He cared not a whit for the mob, whether they were many or few, or however they were armed or infuriated. He was a match for them and would meet them, and had no doubt they would go away faster than they came. They probably would not come near him at all, and if they did it was all right. He knew how to fix them; and so he did."
"However, they came, a mob of fierce, determined, bloodthirsty men, bent on taking the most signal and exemplary vengeance. The infuriated crew numbered about thirty. Their oaths and threats loaded the air with their pestilential burden. Surrounding Holland's house with a guard of armed men, to prevent the possibility of his escape, the ringleader ordered him to come forth and meet his doom, the doom of all men who should tamper with the interests of Polk county by fraudulent schemes. As called for, Holland appeared, told the mob he was willing to submit to their will if they would first allow him to make a speech. None could deny permission though some viewed it with impatience, and Holland mounting a box that stood near, and gazing with calm, unmoving eye into the faces of his hostile auditory commenced his vindication.
" He was an orator and accustomed to sway at will the minds of an audience and direct the feelings of his hearers into any channel he chose. With a voice whose deep, impressive and skillfully inflected tones arrested and held spellbound the most careless listener, with language, if imaginative, which clothed every thought with the most fascinating garb, and, if argumentative, in an impregnable armor and the mysterious, undefinable spirit of eloquence, permeating through and rendering irresistibly powerful every tone, word and gesture, he stirred the hearts of the murderous crowd, impatient for his blood, and turned their sympathies enthusiastically in his favor. Their faces, before distorted with rage, were wreathed with smiles, not only of friendship but of admiration. Their hands, which lately had clinched with angry grasp the most deadly weapon, were frankly extended toward him with all the kindness of intimacy and respect. At the conclusion of his speech they all asked his pardon for the wrong they had done in the impetuosity of their passion, conceived and nearly accomplished, and, having assured Holland of their unfaltering attachment, they withdrew in the very best of humor to the nearest grocery where each drank a" glass of whisky in commemoration of the occasion, the expense of which Holland, who accompanied them, generously defrayed."

398 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

The following is a record of the surveys of Polk county:
Township 77, range 22; surveyed by deputy surveyor Jesse Williams; commenced October 17,
1847, and finished November 1, 1847.
Township 78, range 22; by Samuel Jacobs; commenced August 6 and finished August 21, 1847.
Township 79, range 22; by Samuel Jacobs; commenced August 22, and finished August 29, 1847.
Township 80, range 22; by John D. Evans; commenced September 16, and finished September 23, 1847.
Township 81, range 22; by John D. Evans; commenced September 8, and finished September 15,
1847.
Township 78, range 23; by Samuel W. Durham; commenced November 4, and finished November 19, 1847.
Township 79, range 23; by Samuel W. Durham; commenced September 6, and finished September 11, 1847.
Township 80, range 23; by Joseph Morehead; commenced June 25, and finished July 3, 1847.
Township 81, range 23; by Joseph Morehead; commenced September 6, and finished September
13, 1847.
Township 78, range 24; by S. W. Durham; commenced October 20, and finished November 3, 1847.
Township 79, range 24; by S. W. Durham; commenced September 13, and finished September 27, 1847.
Township 80, range 24; by Joseph Morehead; commenced July 5, and finished July 16, 1847.
Township 81, range 24; by Joseph Morehead; commenced July 17, and finished July 24, 1847.
Township 78, range 25; by S. W. Durham; commenced October 4, and finished October 19, 1847.
Township 79, range 25; by S. W. Durham; commenced September 25, and finished October 2, 1847.
Township 80, range 25; by Joseph Morehead; commenced August 25, and finished September 4, 1847.
Township 81, range 25; by Joe Morehead; commenced July 25, and finished August 5, 1847.
from the foregoing it will be seen that it required about one week to complete the survey of one township.

FIRST LAND ENTRIES

Of course no lands could be sold till they were surveyed, and as the surveys were not completed till late in the year 1847, it follows that but little land was entered prior to the year 1848.
When one township was surveyed the land in that township could be sold, and as we have already seen that the surveys were all completed during the year 1847, it follows that the lands were ready for sale in 1848. In examining the book of original entry we were able to find but one r two entries made in 1847. During the year 1848 considerable land was entered, though probably not so much as during the following year. We have carefully compiled a list of all the lands entered during the first land sales,


399 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

together with the date of entry and names of purchaser. The following is the result:

TOWNSHIP 77, RANGE 22

State of Iowa, sec 1, Jan 12, 1847
Thos. C. McCall, se qr, sec 2, Dec 18, 1848.
Thos. C. McCall, sw qr, sec 2, Dec 18, 1848 .

TOWNSHIP 78, RANGE 22

Susannah Hendrick, SW qr, sec 8, Oct 30, 1848.
Jeferson Robertson, se qr, sec 8, Oct 30, 1848.
Christopher Smith, nw qr, sec 8, Nov 11, 1848.
Thos. Black, sw qr, sec 12, Oct 30, 1848.,
Robert Warren, ne qr of ne qr, sec 18, Oct 30, 1848.
William A. Porter, e hf of sw qr; sec 18, Oct 16, 1848.
Joseph Powers, nw qr, sec 20, Oct 30, 1848.
Valentine Boutwright, sw qr, sec 20, Oct 30, 1848.
George C. Rees, w hf of nw qr and w hf of sw qr, sec 22, Nov 23, 1848.
Patrick Kelley, ne qr, sec 28, Oct 30, 1848.
Nathan Cowley, se qr, sec 28, Oct 30, 1848.
Ezekiel Jennings, lots No 8, 9, 11 and 12, sec 30, Oct 30, 1848.
Robert Warren, w hf of nw qr, sec 32, Oct 30, 1848.
Holiday Wiley, lot No 2, sec 32, Oct 30, 1848.
Holiday Wiley, ne qr, sec 32, Oct 30, 1848..
David Johnson, n hf nw qr, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
James McCollam, nw of ne, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
Chas. Hunter Hamlin, sw of nw qr and nw of sw qr, sec 36, Nov 17, 1848.
William Howard, se of sw qr, sec 36, Nov 23, 1848.
William Howard, se qr, sec 36, Nov 23, 1848.

TOWNSHIP 79, RANGE 22

Blewford Barlow, se qr of ne qr and ne qr of se qr, sec 22, Oct 30, 1848.
Blewford Barlow, e hf of sw qr and w hf of se qr, sec 23, Oct 30.1848.
George Barlow, w hf of ne qr and se qr of ne qr, and se qr of nw qr sec 23, Oct 30, 1848.
Bluford Barlow, w hf of sw qr, sec 23, Oct 30, 1848.
Thos. Mitchell, sw qr of sw qr, sec 24, Oct 30, 1848.
Thos. Mitchell, w hf of nw qr and nw qr of sw qr, sec. 25, Oct 40, 1848.
Thos. Mitchell, nw qr of nw qr, sec 26, Oct 30, 1848.
Thos. Mitchell, e hf of ne and e hf of se qr, sec 26, Oct 30, 1848.

TOWNSHIP 80, RANGE 22

Page 399a

Michael Lavish, s hf of ne qr and s hf of nw qr, sec 8, Oct 30, 1848.
Michael Lavish, ne of sw qr and n hf of se qr, sec 8, Oct 30, 1848.
Michael Lavish, nw qr of sw qr, sec 9, Oct 30, 1848.
William Frederick, sw qr, sec 23, Oct 30, 1848.
William Frederick, se qr, sec 23, Oct 30, 1848.
William Frederick, nw qr, sec 26, Oct 10, 1848.

400 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

James Monroe Gates, e hf of sw qr and w hf of se qr, sec 26, Oct 30, 1848.
William Frederick, w hf of sw qr, sec 26, Oct 30, 1848.
William Frederick, nw of se qr, and a hf of ne qr, and sw qr of ne qr, sec 27, Oct 30, 1848.
William Frederick, e hf of se qr, sec 27, Oct 30, 1848.
George Barlow, sw of se qr, see 27, Oct 30, 1848.
James Monroe Gates, ne qr, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
Eli Trullinger, nw qr, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
James Monroe Gates, nw qr, sec 35, Oct 30, 1848.

TOWNSHIP 81, RANGE 22

John Penn s hf of sw qr, and nw qr of sw qr, sec 3, July 18, 1847.
John Penn, ne qr of se qr, sec 4, July 18, 1847.

TOWNSHIP 78, RANGE 23

John Barlow, sw qr, sec 2, Oct 30, 1848.
Lewis Barlow, lots Nos 5, 6, 11 and 12, sec 2, Oct 30, 1848.
George Barlow, lots Nos 2, 3 and 4, sec 2, Oct 31, 1840.
Jacob Frederick, se qr, sec 4, Oct 30, 1848.
Jacob Frederick, lots 5, 6, 11 and 12, sec 4, Oct 30, 1848.
Jacob Frederick, sw qr, sec 4, Oct 30, 1848.
Jacob Frederick, lots -Nos 1, 2, 3 and 4, sec 4, Oct 30, 1848.
Jacob Frederick, lots Nos 7, 8, 9 and 10, sec 4, Oct 30, 1848.
Jacob Harris, lots Nos 1, 2 and 8, sec 6, Oct 30, 1848.
George Curran, se qr, sec 6, Oct 30, 1848.
Samuel Harvey, nw qr, sec 8, Oct 30, 1848.
David F. Randolph, ne qr, sec 8, Oct 30, 1848.
Thos. H. Napier, nw of se qr, and ne of sw qr, and w hf of sw qr, sec 8, Oct 30, 1848.
Lyle Garrett, e hf of se qr, and sw qr of se qr, and se of sw qr, see 8, Nov 4, 1848.
William Stuart, w hf of ne qr, sec 12, Oct 16, 1848.
James N. Stuart, e hf of nw qr, and e hf of sw qr, sec 12, Oct 16, 1848.
Jesse B. Grimstead, w hf of nw qr, sec 12, Oct .30, 1848.
J. D. Vice, se qr, sec 14, Oct 30, 1848.
Lewis Barlow, sw qr, sec 14,-Oct 30, 1848.
Peter Newcomer, n hf of ne qr, and lots Nos 1 and 2, sec 18, Oct 30, 1848.
Peter Newcomer, lots Nos 3, 4 and 5, and se qr of nw qr, and nw qr of se qr, sec 18, Oct 30,
1848.
Peter Newcomer,e hf se qr, and nw of se qr, and e qr of ne qr, sec 18, Oct 30, 1848.
Newton Lamb, lot No 3, sec 20, Oct 30, 1848.
Charles Keeney, se qr, sec 20, Oct 30, 1848.
James Connett, w hf se qr, sec 26, Oct 16, 1848.
Joshua B. Chapman, e hf of sw qr, and e hf of nw qr, sec 26, Oct 30, 1848.
Delilah Gooch, e hf of se qr, sec 28, Oct 16, 1848.
John McMahan, w hf of se qr, and e hf of sw qr, sec 28, Oct 30, 1848.

401 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

John D. McGlothlen, ne qr, sec 28, Oct 30, 1848.
John D. McGlothlen, e hf of se -qr, and s hf of ne qr, sec 30, Oct 30; 1848.
George Krysher, nw qr of ne qr, and e hf of nw qr, and sw qr of nw qr; sec 32, Nov 27, 1848.
George Krysher, sw of ne qr, and w hf of se qr, and ne qr of sw qr, sec 32, Nov 27, 1848.
William Buzick, sw qr, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
William Buzick, nw qr, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
James P. Deaton, ne qr, sec 34, Dee 16, 1848.
Jeremiah Church, s. hf of se qr, and lots Nos 5 and 6, sec 36, Oct 16, 1848.

TOWNSHIP 79, RANGE 23

Mary Ann Cooney, se qr, sec 4, Oct 30, 1848.
Foster Elliott, nw qr, sec 5, Oct 30, 1848.
Dillon Haworth, ne qr, sec 5, Oct 30, 1848.
Foster Elliott, sw qr, sec 5, Oct 30, 1848.
Frederick Elliott, se qr, sec 5, Oct 30, 1848.
John T. Bundrum, e hf of se, and nw of se, and se of ne, sec 8, Oct 30, 1848.
Isaac Cooper, ne qr, sec 14, Oct 30, 1848.
William Cooper, e hf of se qr, and nw of se qr, and se of ne qr, sec 20, Oct 30, 1848.
William Cooper, ne qr of ne qr, sec 20, Oct 30, 1848.
William Cooper, n hf of nw qr, and nw qr of ne qr, sec 21, Oct 30, 1848.
State of Iowa, s hf and nw qr, and sw of ne qr, sec 25, Aug 8, 1846.
State of Iowa, n hf of ne, and se of ne, Sec 25, August 8, 1846.
Stephen Harvey, s hf of nw qr, and ne of nw qr, and sw of ne qr, sec 26, Oct 30, 1848.
John Hanlin, e hf of se qr, and sw of se qr, and se of sw qr, sec; 26, Oct 30, 1848.
Stephen Harvey, sw of sw qr, and n hf of sw hf, and nw of se qr, sec 26, Oct 130, 1848.
Pembroke Gault, ne qr, sec 32, Oct 30, 1848.
Larnard S. Case, nw qr, sec 32, Oct 30, 1848..
Daniel W. Ballard, se qr of se qr, sec 32, Nov 6, 1848.
Conrad D. Reinking, sw qr. sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
Conrad D. Reinking, nw qr, sec 34, Oct 30. 1848.
Jacob Frederick, se qr, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
John W. Oglevie, se of ne qr, sec 34, Nov 6, .1848.

TOWNSHIP 80, RANGE 23

Isaac W. Cory, nw qr of nw qr, sec 1, Oct 30, 1848.
Nathan Thornton, se of nw qr, sec 18, Nov 9, 1848.
Nathan Thornton, sw qr, sec 29, Oct 16, 1848.
Riley H. Thornton, se qr of ne qr, sec 31, Nov 9, 1848.
Daniel Justice, se of se qr, sec 31, Oct 30, 1848.

402 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

Daniel Justice, ne of se qr, and w hf of se qr, and sw of ne, sec 31, Nov 9, 1848.
State of Iowa, w hf of nw, and w hf of sw, and se qr of sw, sec 31, Jan 12, 1847.
Riley H. Thornton, nw qr, sec 32, Oct 16, 1848.
Daniel Justice, w hf of sw qr,,and ne of sw qr, sec 32, Oct 30, 1848.
Isaac Thornton, s hf of se, and se of sw, sec 32, Oct 30, 1848.
Riley H Thornton, s hf of ne, and n hf of se, sec 32, Dec 16, 1848.
Isaac Thornton, sw of sw qr, sec 33, Oct 30, 1848.

TOWNSHIP 81, RANGE 23

Isaac W. Cory, se qr of se qr, sec 35, Oct 30, 1848
Jeremiah Cory, ne of se qr, sec 35, Oct 30, 1848.
Jeremiah Cory, ne qr, sec 36, Oct 30, 1848.
Jeremiah Cory, nw qr of sw qr, and w hf of nw qr, sec 36, 1848.
Jeremiah Cory, e hf of nw qr, and e hf of sw qr, sec 36, Oct 30, 1848.
Isaac W. Cory, sw qr of sw qr, sec 36, Oct 30, 1848.
Jeremiah Cory, se qr, sec 36, Oct 30, 1848.

TOWNSHIP 78, RANGE 24

Thomas K. Brooks, se qr, sec 2, Oct 30, 1848.
Joseph Myers, n hf of nw qr, and sw qr of nw qr, sec 2, Oct 30, 1848.
John S. Dean, ne qr, sec 2, Oct 30, 1848.
Thos. K. Brooks, sw qr, sec 2, Oct 30, 1848.
John S. Dean, lots Nos 1, 2 and 3, sec 3, Oct 16, 1848.
John S. Dean, nw qr of sw qr, and ne qr of nw qr, and lot No 4, sec 3, Oct 30, 1848.
Andrew Grosclose, James Mount and Thos. Black (Commissioners of Polk county), lot No 5, sec
4, May 12, 1848.
Richard Holcomb, s hf of nw qr, sec 4, Oct 30, 1848.
Richard Holcomb, sw qr, sec 4, Oct 30, 1848.
Edwin Hall and Edward Hall, nw qr of ne qr, and n hf of nw qr, sec 4, Oct 30, 1848.
Edwin Hall and Edward Hall, lots Nos 2, 3 and 4, sec 4, Oct 30, 1848.
John S. Dean, lot No 1, sec 4, Dec 16, 1848.
Andrew Grosclose, James Mount and Thos. Black (Commissioners of Polk county), lot No 5 of
sec 4, lot 1 and nw qr of ne qr, sec 9, and lot No 5 of sec 10, ay 12, 1848.
Henry Everly, e hf of ne qr, sec 5, Oct 16, 1848.
John S. Dean, w hf of nw qr, sec 5, Oct 16, 1848.
Lewis Jones, sw qr, sec 5, Oct 30, 1848.
Abel J. Cain, e hf of nw qr, and w hf of ne qr, sec 5, Oct 30, 1848.
Jonathan Lyon, Jr., se qr, sec 5, Oct 30, 1848.
Solomon McCain, se qr, sec 6, Oct 30, 1848.
Eli Mosier, n hf of ne qr, sec 6, Nov 18, 1848.
John Crabtree, Jr., se qr of sw qr, sec 7, Oct 30, 1848.

Page 402a

Ezra Rathbun, ne qr, sec 7, Oct 30, 1848.
Ezra Rathbun ne qr of se, and lot No 1, sec 7, Oct 30, 1848.
William W. Jones, e hf of nw qr, sec 7, Dec 16, 1848.

403 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

Jonathan Lyon, Jr., ne qr of ne qr, and lots Nos 2 and 3, sec 8, Oct 16, 1848.
John Rupe, nw qr of nw qr, and lots Nos 4, 5 and 6, see 8, Oct 30, 1848.
William R. Close, lot No 8, sec 8, Nov 18, 1848.
Martin Tucker, lots No 2 and 3, sec 9, Oct 16, 1848.
Pierce B. Fagen, nw qr, sec 9, Oct 30, 1848.
William T. Ayres, lot No 4, sec 9, Dec 18, 1848.
Charles C. Van, lot No 7, sec 9, Dec 4, 1848.
Andrew Grosclose, James Mount and Thomas Black (Commissioners of Polk county), lot No 1
and nw qr of ne qr, sec 9, May 12, 1848.
Andrew Grosclose, James Mount and Thomas Black (Commissioners of Polk county, lot No 5,
sec 10, May 12, 1848.
William Lyon, n hf of ne qr, and lots Nos 1, 2, 3 and 4, sec 10, Oct 16, 1848.
Charles C. Van, lots Nos 7, 8 and 9, sec 10, Oct 30, 1848.
Charles C Van, se qr of sw qr, and w hf of sw qr, and lot No 6, sec 10, Oct 30. 1848.
Thos. J. Henderson, ne qr, sec 12, Oct 30, 1848.
Thos. J. Henderson, lots -Nos 1, 2, 3 and 4, sec 12, Oct 30, 1848.
Thos. J. Henderson, nw qr, sec 12, Oct 31, 1848.
William Lamb, ne qr of ne qr, sec 14, Oct 30, 1848.
James Anderson, se qr, sec 14, Nov 18, 1848.
William R. Close, sw qr of nw qr, and ne qr of nw qr, and lot No 2, sec 17, Nov 18, 1848.
Henry Everly, ne qr, sec 17, Dec 6, 1848.
James Campbell, lots Nos 2, 3 and 4, see 18, Oct 30, 1848.
Alexander N. Hayes, se qr, sec 20, Oct 30, 1848.
Robert A. Harbord, se qr, sec 24, Oct 30, 1848.

TOWNSHIP,79, RANGE 24

John Saylor, w hf of sw qr, sec 2, Oct 30, 1848.
Jehu P. Saylor, nw qr of nw qr, sec 3, Oct 30, 1848.
John G. Myers, ne qr, sec 3, Oct 30, 1848.
John Saylor, s hf of sw qr, and s hf of se qr, sec 3, Oct 30, 1848.
John Saylor, n hf of se qr, and n hf of sw qr, sec 3, Oct 30, 1848.
Benjamin Saylor, nw qr, sec 4, Oct 30, 1848.
Jehu P. Saylor, s hf of ne qr, and ne of ne qr, sec 4, Oct 30, 1848.
John Hays, se qr, sec 4, Oct 30, 1848.
Solomon Bales, nw qr of ne qr, and ne hf of nw qr, sec 5, Oct 30, 1848.
Solomon Bales, e hf of ne qr, and lot No 3, sec 5, Oct 30, 1848.
William P. Koger, s hf of ne qr, and n hf of se qr, sec 6, Oct 30, 1848.
Joseph Deford, e hf of se qr, sec 8, Oct 30, 1848.
Allen W. Hobson, e hf of ne qr, and lots Nos 3 and 4, sec 8, Oct 30, 1848.
Allen W. Hobson, ne qr, sec 9, Oct 30, 1848.
Joseph Deford, w hf of aw qr, sec 9, Oct 30, 1848.
Allen W. Hobson, nw qr, sec 9, Oct 30, 1848.

Page 403a

John Saylor, n hf of ne qr, and n hf of nw qr, sec 10, Oct 30, 1848.
David Norris,e hf of ne qr, sec 11, Oct 30, 1848.
John Saylor, w hf of nw qr, sec 11, Oct 30, 1848.
David Norris, w hf of nw qr, sec 12, Oct 30,1848.

404 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

Joseph Deford, lot No 4, sec 17, Oct 16, 1848.
James Thomas, w hf of nw qr, and lots Nos 5 and 6, sec 17, Oct 30, 1848.
Christopher Baker, s hf of ne qr, and n hf of se qr, sec 20, Oct 30, 1848.
Benjamin F. Allen, lots Nos 1 and 12, sec 21, Oct 17, 1848.
Thos. Baker, lots Nos 6, 7 and 8, sec 21, Oct 30, 1848.
Thos. Baker, e hf of sw qr, and lots Nos 4 and 5, sec 21, Oct 30, 1848.
Benjamin F. Allen, sw of nw qr, and nw qr of aw qr, sec 22, Oct 30, 1848.
Rebecca Daily, s hf of ne qr, and n hf of se qr, sec 22, Oct 30, 1848.
Benjamin F. Allen, nw of sw qr, sec 26, Oct 30, 1848.
Andrew McF. Thompson, s hf of sw, sec 26, Oct 30 1848.
Andrew McF. Thompson, se qr, sec 26, Oct 30,1848.
Benjamin F. Allen, nw qr, sec 26, Oct 30, 1848.
William R. Close, lots Nos 4 and 5, sec 27, Oct 16, 1848.
Andrew McF. Thompson, lots Nos 2 and 3, sec 27, Oct 30, 1848.
Andrew McF. Thompson, lot No 1, and se qr of se qr, sec 27, Oct 30, 1848.
Thos. Crabtree, n hf of nw qr, and n hf of ne qr, sec 27, Oct 30, 1848.
Andrew McF. Thompson, s hf of ne qr, and n hf of se qr, sec 27, Oct 30, 1848.
Andrew McF. Thompson, lot No 1, sec 28, Oct 30, 1848.
John Stroup, e hf of nw qr, and lots Nos 3, 4 and 5, sec 28, Oct 30, 1848.
Pierce B. Fagen, sw qr of se qr, and lot No 6, sec 28, Oct 30, 1848.
John Stroup, lot No 1, sec 28, Oct 30, 1848.
John Lewis, sw qr, sec 29, Oct 30, 1848.
John Lewis, se qr, sec 29, Oct 30, 1848.
Eli Mosier, se qr of se. qr, sec 32, Nov 18, 1848.
Daniel Hickman, n hf of ne qr, and e hf of nw qr, sec 32, Dec 9, 1848.
Jonathan Lyon, Jr., sw qr, sec 33, Oct 16, 1848.
George Shell, se qr of se qr, sec 33, Oct 30, 1848.
Pierce B. Fagen, n hf of ne qr, sec 33, Oct 30, 1848.
John C. Jones. s hf of ne qr, and n hf of se qr, sec 33, Nov 4, 1848.
Benjamin T. Hoxie, nw qr, sec 33, Dec 16, 1848.
William W. Jones, se qr of sw qr, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
George Shell, n hf of sw qr, and sw qr of sw qr, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
Benjamin F. Allen, se qr, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
Benjamin F. Allen, s hf of ne qr, and lots Nos 2 and 3, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
Thompson Bird, nw qr, sec 24, Oct 30, 1848.
Benjamin F. Allen, lots Nos 6, 7 and 8, sec 35, Oct 16, 1848.
Andrew McF. Thompson, lots Nos 1 and 2, sec 35, Nov 18, 1848,
Andrew McF. Thompson, lot No 5, sec 35, Oct 30, 1848.
Andrew McF. Thompson, n hf of ne qr, and lots Nos 3 and 4, sec 35, Oct 30, 1848.
Andrew McF. Thompson, se qr of ne qr, sec 35, Oct 30, 1848.
Andrew McF. Thompson, w hf of sw qr, and sw of nw qr, sec 36 Oct 30, 1848.
Andrew McF. Thompson, e hf of nw qr, and e hf of sw qr, sec 36, Oct 30,1848

405 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

TOWNSHIP 80, RANGE 24

Stephen Harvey, se qr, sec 7, Oct 31, 1848.
Henry Everly, ne qr, sec 18, Oct 16, 1848.
Jacob M. Marts, w hf of se qr, and ne of se qr, sec 18, Nov 18, 1848.
Jacob M. Marts, sw qr of ne qr, sec 19, Nov 27, 1848.
Jacob M. Marts, e hf of nw qr, and nw of nw qr, and lot No 3, sec 19, Nov 18, 1848.
Jacob M. Marts, nw qr of ne qr, sec 19, Nov 18, 1848.
Thomas Gilpin, sw qr, sec 21, Oct 30, 1848.
Conrad Dietz, s hf of se qr, sec 21, Oct 30, 1848.
Nathan Koons, n hf of se qr, sec 21, .Oct 30, 1848.
Daniel Brumbaugh, nw qr, sec 21, Oct 30, 1848.
Nathan Koons ne. qr, sec 21, Oct 30, 1848.
Nathan Koons, nw qr, sec 22,,Oct 30, 1848.
Conrad Dietz, s hf of sw qr, sec 22, Oct 30, 1848.
Nathan Koons, n hf of sw qr, sec 22. Oct 30, 1848.
Samuel Harvey, nw qr, sec 26, Oct 31, 1848.
Lysander Harvey, s hf of nw qr, and n hf of sw qr, sec 27, Oct 30, 1848
David Miller, n hf of nw qr, sec 27, Oct 30, 1848.
Lysander Harvey, s hf of ne qr, and n hf of se qr, sec 28, Oct 30, 1848.
David Miller, n hf of ne qr, sec 28, Oct 30, 1848.
Jacob F. Randolph, e hf of sw qr, and s hf of se qr, sec 28, Oct 30, 1848.
Jacob Shelhart, n hf of nw qr, sec 28, Dec 4, 1848.
Garrison Sulser, lot No 6, sec 29, Oct 16, 1848.
Samuel Harvey, e hf of nw qr, and w hf of ne qr, sec 29, Oct 31, 1848.
William Snodgrass, lot No 2, sec 29, Dec 4, 1848.
John Shelhart, e hf of ne qr, sec 29, Dec 4, 1848.
William Snodgrass, lot Nos 7 and 8, sec 30, Dec 4,1848.
William Snodgrass, lot No 1, sec 31, Dec 4, 1848.
Solomon Bales, w hf of ne qr, and se of nw qr, and lot No 2, sec 32, Oct 30, 1848.
Solomon Bales, w hf of se qr, sec 32, Oct 30, 1848.
William Snodgrass, lot No 1,. sec 32, Dec 4, 1848.
Solomon Bales, e hf of ne qr, and e hf of se qr, sec 32, Oct 30, 1848.
Benjamin Saylor, sw qr, sec 33, Oct 30, 1848.
Edward Keeler, e hf of se qr, sec 33, Oct 0,1848.
Franklin Nagle, ne qr, sec 33, Oct 30, 1848.
John G. Myers, ne qr, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
Edward Keeler, w hf of sw qr, sec 34, Oct 30, 1848.
John Saylor, se qr, sec 34, Nov 18, 1848.

TOWNSHIP 78, RANGE 25

Calvin Bennett, w hf of se qr, sec 12, Oct 16, 1848.

Page 405a

Samuel L. Shaw, SW qr, sec 12, Oct 30, 1848.
Thomas Britton, e hf of se qr, sec 12, Oct 30, 1848.
Thomas Britton, lots No 1 and 2, sec 13, Oct 30, 1848.
Henry Everly, lot No 5, sec 13, Nov 13, 1848.
Henry Everly, sw of sw qr, sec 13, Nov 13, 1848.
Charles Goods, lots Nos 3 and 4, and nw qr of nw qr, sec 13, Nov 23,1848.
Samuel Hiner, se qr of sw qr, and sw of se qr, sec 13, Dec 9, 1848.

406 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

Henry Everly, lots Nos 6, 7 and 9, sec 14, Nov 13, 1848.
Henry Everlv, s hf of se qr, and se qr of sw qr, sec 14, Nov 13, 1848.
Charles Goods, lot No 1, sec 14, Nov 23, 1848.
Thomas McMullen, sw qr of nw qr, and n hf of sw qr, and lot No 3, sec 15, Dec 6, 1848.
Thomas McMullen, lot No 1, and nw of ne qr, and e hf of nw qr, sec 15, Dec 6,1848.
Jacob Lyon, lot No 5, sec 21, Oct 30,1848.
Samuel Hiner, n hf of nw qr, sec 24, Dec 4, 1848.
Jacob Lyon, e hf of nw qr, and lot No 2, sec 28, Oct 30, 1848.

TOWNSHIP 79, RANGE 25

John Watts, w hf of sw qr, sec 13, Nov 27, 1848.
Samuel Hiner, se qr, sec 13, Dec 4, 1848.
John Watts, ne qr of ne qr, sec 23, Nov 27, 1848.
John Watts, nw of nw qr, sec 24, Nov 7, 1848.
Jacob Thrailkill, e hf of ne qr, and e hf of se qr, sec 35, Oct 30, 1848.

TOWNSHIP 80, RANGE 25

George Beebe, w hf of nw qr, and n hf of sw qr, sec 1, Nov 13, 1848.
William VanDorn, s hf of se qr, and s hf of sw qr, sec 2, Nov 18, 1848.
George Beebe, n hf of sw qr, and n hf of se qr, sec 2, Dec 6, 1848.
Pleasant Foutz, se qr, sec 26, Nov 18, 1848.

TOWNSHIP 81, RANGE 25

Andrew Grosclose, e hf of nw qr, and w hf of ne qr, sec 27, Oct 30,1848.
Samuel Hiner, w hf of sw qr, and se of sw qr, and lot No 2, sec 29, Dec 4, 1848..
John Foutz, lot No 1, sec 29, Dec 18, 1848.
John Foutz, e hf of se qr, and lot No 4, sec 30, Dec 18, 1848.
John Crabtree, Sr., e hf of se qr, sec 35, Oct 30, 1848.
George Beebe, sw qr, sec 35, Oct 30, 1848.
John Crabtree, Sr., w hf of sw qr, sec 36, Oct 30, 1848.
John Crabtree, Sr., e hf of sw qr, and w hf of se qr, sec 36, Nov 27, 1848.

492 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

OFFICIAL DIRECTORY

In 1846 the following officers were elected:
Probate Judge-John Saylor. Sheriff-Thomas Mitchell. Coroner James Phillips. Surveyor-A. D.
Jones. Recorder-Thomas McMullen. Treasurer-W. T. Ayers. Assessor-G. B. Clark.
Collector-Addison Michael. Commissioners-Benj. Saylor, W. H. Meacham, G. W. Fouts.
After this first election there was no record of elections kept till the year 1852. From some
documents in existence we learn, however, that during this time there were the following
officials

1847
Sheriff-Peter Myers. Prosecuting Attorney-.L. D: Winchester.

1848
Clerk of Court-Henry Early. Commissioner-J. D. McGlothlen.

1849
Clerk of Court-Hoyt Sherman From 1852 the record is complete, and shows the following:

1852
County Judge-Byron Rice. Clerk of Court-Wm. T. Morris. School Fund Commissioner-R. W.
Sypher. Prosecuting Attorney-J. M. Perry. Senator-A. Y. Hull. Representatives=Benj. Green and
J. F. Rice.

493 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

1853
Treasurer and Recorder-Samuel Gray. Sheriff-Wm. H. McHenry. Surveyor-John McClain.
Coroner-Walter Oyler.

1854
Clerk of Court--R. L. Chrystal. Prosecuting Attorney-Barlow Granger.

1855
Treasurer and Recorder-John E. Groom. Coroner-Noah Devault. Surveyor-John H. Millard.
County Judge-T. H. Napier. Sheriff D. B. Spaulding.

1856
Representatives-William P. Davis and Benj. Green. Clerk of Court H. M. Hoxie. Prosecuting
Attorney--J. H. Gray.

1857
County Judge-T. H. Napier. Treasurer and Recorder-S. M. Dyer. Sheriff- D. B. Spaulding.
Surveyor-J. C. Booth. Coroner-G. W. Conner. Representative-Thomas Mitchell.

1858
Clerk of Court-H. M. Hoxie. Superintendent Schools--Samuel Bell.

1859
Representative-Stewart Goodrell. County Judge.-John H. McClelland. Treasurer and Recorder-J.
B. Tiffin. Sheriff-John Hays. Superintendent Schools-C. C. Dawson. Surveyor-N. R. Kuntz.
Coroner -James Stanton. Drainage Commissioner-John Hartman.

1860
Clerk of Court-J. M. Laird.

1861
Senator-J. H. Hatch. Representative-John Mitchell. Sheriff - I. W. Griffith. Treasurer and
Recorder-J. B. Tiffin. County Judge-J. H. McClelland. Superintendent Schools-E. D. Hawes.
Surveyor-B. Callan. Drainage Commissioner-A. C. Bondurant. Coroner-Thomas Elliott.

1862
Clerk of Court-J. M. Laird.

494 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

1863
Representative-N. Baylies. County Judge-J. H. McClelland. Sheriff-H. M. Bush. Treasurer and
Recorder-J. T. Tiffin. Superintendent of Schools-S. Borrows. Surveyor-J. P. Foster. Coroner-J. M. Reicheneker. Drainage Commissioner-William VanDorn.

1864
Clerk of Court-H. H. Griffiths. County Recorder-John Jack.

1865
Senator-Jonathan Cattell. Representatives Hoyt Sherman and G. S. Godfrey. County Judge-W. G.
Bentley. Sheriff- Nathaniel McCalla. Superintendent of Schools-Leonard Brown. Treasurer
Jeremiah B. Tiffin. Surveyor-J. B. Bausman. Coroner-William F. Tate. Drainage
Commissioner-J. N. Newell.

1866
County Judge-John G. Weeks. Clerk of Court--H. H. Griffiths. Recorder-I. N. Thomas.

1867
Representatives-J. H. Hatch and John A. Kasson. County Judge-J. B. Miller. Treasurer-C. G.
Lewis. Sheriff-P. H. VanSlyck. Superintendent of Schools-C. A. Mosier. Surveyor-J. B.
Bausman. Coroner -Madison Young. Drainage Commissioner-James Bruindigi.

1868
Clerk of Court-H. H. Griffiths. Recorder-I. N. Thomas.

1869
Senator-B. F. Allen. Representatives--John A. Kasson and G. W. Jones. Auditor-John B. Miller.
Treasurer-C. G. Lewis. Sheriff-P. H. VanSlyck. Surveyor-P. B. Reed. Superintendent of
Schools-J. A. Nash. Coroner-A. G. Field.

1870
Clerk of Court-H. H. Griffiths. Recorder-I. N. Thomas. County .Supervisors-P. D. Ankeny, Brian Hawley and Edwin Oakes.

1871
Representatives--John A. Kasson, J. M. Tuttle. Auditor-John B. Miller. Treasurer-F. R. Laird.
Sheriff-D. M. Bringolf. Superintendent of Schools--J. A. Nash. Supervisor-G. W. Baldwin.
Surveyor Frank Pelton. Coroner-A. M. Overman.

495 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

1872
Clerk of Courts-John H. McClelland. Recorder J. C. Read.

1873
Senator--Thomas Mitchell. Representatives-Isaac Brandt, W. G. Madden. Auditor-Geo. C.
Baker. Treasurer-William Lowry-Sheriff D. M. Bringolf. Surveyor--Frank Pelton. Superintendent
of Schools D. G. Perkins. Coroner-A. M. Overman. Supervisor-Nathan Parmenter.

1874
Clerk of Courts-J. H. McClelland. Recorder-J. C. Read. Supervi,sors-T. T. Morris, William
Christy, William B. Butler, H. L. Y oung.

1875
Representatives-Josiah Given, William G. Madden. Auditor-Geo. C. Baker. Treasurer-William
Lowry. Sheriff--George Lendrum. Surveyor-Frank Felton. Superintendent of Schools-R. S. Hughes. Coroner-I. W. Griffith. Supervisor-James Porter.

1876
Clerk of Courts-J. L. Keyes. Recorder--J. C. Read. Supervisors-N. Parmenter, Wm. Ellison.

1877
Senator-R. C. Webb. Representatives-C. S. Wilson, J. B. Tiffin. Auditor-G. W. Bristow.
Treasurer-William Lowry. Sheriff-George Lendrum. Surveyor-Frank Felton. Superintendent of
Schools-James H. Koons. Coroner---I. W. Griffith. Supervisors--Geo. W. Baldwin, ,Wm. Christy, Samuel Britton.

1878
Clerk of Courts--James L. Keyes. Recorder--George H. Gardner. Supervisor--James Porter.

1879
Representatives-J. C. Jordan, J. A. Harvey. Auditor--G. W. Bristow. Treasurer-Richard K.
Miller. Sheriff-A. D. Littleton. Surveyor--Frank Pelton. Superintendent of Schools-J. H. Koons.
Coroner-I. W. Griffith. Supervisors--G. W. Miles, Levi Krysher.

 


From Union Historical Company.  1880.  The History of Polk County, Iowa.  Des Moines: Birdsall, Williams, and Company.  p. 355-356.

SKUNK RIVER SETTLEMENTS

The first settlements made in this locality were by Eli Trulinger and Michael Lavish. A small stream flows in a northeastern direction emptying into the Skunk river in section 23, township 80, range 22. Along this stream in sections 26, 27, 34, and 35 there was originally a wide belt or "point" of timber. In April, 1846, Eli Trulinger took a claim and began a settlement in the southwestern part of the belt of timber in section 34. He having been the only settler in that locality for a number of years, the belt of timber took his name and the place is still known as Trulinger's Grove. This was a very desirable location in early days and the country became rapidly settled up, especially such portions as were well supplied with timber. Farther to the northwest, following the general course of the Skunk river, in sections 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, was originally quite an extensive belt of timber. In May, 1846, Michael Lavish took a claim there and the place is still called Lavish Grove.
Among the early settlers in that neighborhood were Nathan Webb, Ezekiel Jennings, Joseph Jones and a son of Michael Lavish. This was a favorite resort in early times for trappers and hunters; game of all kinds abounded in the timber and region round about, while fur-bearing animals and fish, for which Skunk river has always been famous, were easily taken in great numbers. Wandering bands of Indians belonging to the peaceable Pottawattamie tribe, and a remnant of the Musquakie, who remained long after the stipulations of the treaty of 1842 went into effect, made this region a favorite resort. The Musquakie band originally lived on the south bank of the Iowa river, near where is now the western boundary of Tama county. They were removed west with the other Indians in 1845-46, but many of them wandered back to their old hunting grounds. For a time the government declined to allow them a pro rata share of their annuity unless they would return to their reservation. They, however, persisted in remaining, and from time to time acquired the title to several tracts of land, amounting to over four hundred acres, when the government changed its policy, paying them their proportion of the annuity, and allowing them to remain. There a remnant of the tribe still lives, cultivating a portion of the land, and as a rule, behaving themselves in a becoming manner. During certain portions of the year they leave their home and visit other portions of the State, either on hunting excursions, or to dispose of the pelts they have already taken. The Indians who are frequently seen in Polk county, belong to that band. During the early settlement of Polk county, they frequently visited this locality, and especially to the settlers along Skunk river they were a familiar sight. The few families of early settlers were seldom molested by these roving bands of savages, although they were frequently very saucy and threatening. These roving bands were more numerous in the Skunk river settlements than any other part of Polk county, owing to the splendid facilities for hunting and fishing. It was no unusual occurrence for as many as fifty deer to be found in one drove in the Lavish settlement. Wolves also were

356 HISTORY OF POLK COUNTY

very numerous and troublesome. It is said that in the winter of 1846-47 a pack of these noxious animals attacked a man by the name of Elliott; he was on horseback and was compelled to flee for his life; the wolves pursued him a distance of eight miles.
Further to the northwest was Corey's Grove, named thus in honor of Walker Corey who settled there in 1846; John Fisher also settled there at an early time and these two were the only settlers who lived in that neighborhood for some time. This settlement was the farthest north in the Skunk river valley, and the two solitary settlers had many hardships to endure. They, however, aided each other. When there was no flour, as was frequently the case, they used bran and when this was gone they ate cakes made of pounded corn.
Christopher Birge located in the vicinity of Lavish Grove in 1846, and in the fall of the same year he was prostrated by an attack of malarial fever, from the effects of which he died during the winter. Mr. Birge had previously lived in Fort Des Moines and it was his daughter, Miss Elvira Birge, a young woman of eighteen years, who became the wife of Benjamin Bryant, on the 11th day of June, 1846, being the first marriage in the county. Mr. Turrell, in his reminiscences, says: " The ceremony was performed by Aaron D. Stark, Esq. It was also Squire Stark's first essay at performing the marriage rite, and he is said to have introduced some variations from the ordinary ritual."

 


From Union Historical Company.  1880.  The History of Polk County, Iowa.  Des Moines: Birdsall, Williams, and Company.  p. 1003-1012.

FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP.

BIDDLE, WILLIAM-Farmer, section 20, P. 0. Altoona. Was born in Germany, June 23, 1823,
followed the business of a mercantile clerk until he was twenty-six years of age, then became
postmaster, under contract and followed that until 1851. Immigrated to the United States and
settled in Franklin township, Polk county, Iowa, where he now owns 160 acres of land, 120 under
cultivation. He was married to Josephine Stehle, of Germany. They have six children: Christian,
Charles, Tullius, Emma, Ingnetz and Albert, all living in Polk county. He was a volunteer in the
army of his country during the disturbance of 1848. Was among the first settlers of this township.

BONDURANT, A. C.-Farmer and stock-raiser, section 31, P. O. Altoona. Among the many.
enterprising citizens of Polk county may be mentioned the subject of this sketch, who was born
in Sangamon county, Illinois, on the first day of September, 1829, and was raised thereon a farm.
He started in life with a laudable ambition to succeed, and, with nothing but his willing hands
and hopeful heart to overcome all obstacles, he commenced to build on the solid foundation of
honest industry. He availed himself of a cherished plan to locate in the promising State of Iowa,
and in

1004 BIOGRAPHICAL.

1857 came to Polk county and purchased land in this and Douglas townships and from year to
year he has added to his possessions and now owns over twenty-five hundred acres of land and
he has proved himself one of the most practical as well as successful agriculturalists in the
county. As a stock-raiser and feeder he takes a front rank. The small house he first built after his
arrival has changed to a stately mansion, surrounded with stately shade and ornamental trees, and
his home gives every indication of ease and comfort. He has been closely identified with the
interests of the county and his influence is always on the side of right and justice, and having
turned the whole force of his life in one direction, has secured the reward which must follow
persistent, honorable effort. He was married October 27, 1861, to Miss Margaret M. Brooks, of
Rising Sun, Iowa, a lady whose life has been devoted to making home happy and one who proves
to be her husband's best counselor. They have six children: Emma (born August 23, 1862),
Fannie ( born October 22, 1864), Florence (born September 26, 1870), Charles B. (born
December 4, 1873), Nellie (born November 23, 1874), Alexander (born October 1,1878). Mr.
and Mrs. Bondurant are both active members of the Christian Church and are among its most
active workers and most liberal contributors. Mr. B., in order to guard against any future
embarrassment of the church, has deeded to it forty acres of good land, an act that indicates his
interest in its present as well as future welfare.

BROTHERS, JESSE-Farmer, section 35, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Pasquotank county,
North Carolina, in 1824, and was raised there and in Guilford county, North Carolina, until he
was twenty-one years of age. Then moved and settled in Wayne county, Indiana, where he
resided until 1856, when he came to Iowa and settled in Jasper county. Lived there until 1866,
when he came to this county and settled in this township, and now owns 160 acres of land,
mostly under cultivation. He followed the occupation of carpenter until he came to Iowa, when
he commenced agricultural pursuits. Was married to Eliza Crawford, born in Ohio, in 1851. They
have four children: Leroy, William, Mary Jane and Samuel. Have lost .one child.

CAHOUN, WILLIAM H.-Farmer, section 22, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Meigs county,
Ohio, April 21, 1840, and remained there until 1858, when he came to Iowa, settling in this
township. He is the owner of 120 acres of land, nearly all of which is under cultivation. August
14, 1862, he was united in marriage with Sarah A. McCleary, daughter of Abel and Susanah
McCleary. They have two children living: Rose and Jennie L. Have lost two. Mr. C. has held the
offices of township trustee, ,constable, road supervisor, etc. He and his wife are connected with
the M. E. Church.

CHAMBERS, S. E.-Farmer, section 26, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Harrison county, Ohio,
October 10, 1834, and resided there until 1854, when he came to Iowa and settled in Polk county.
Has followed farming from youth and now owns 120 acres of improved land. He was married
February 29, 1868, to Elnora Schafer, of Jasper county, Iowa. They have six children: Franklin
G., William P., Charles Emery, Harrison C.; Samuel Edwin and Mary Isabella. He enlisted July
21, 1863, in the Eighth Iowa cavalry and was promoted to sixth corporal. Joined Rosecrans at
Louisville, Kentncky, thence to Nashville and Jobnsville. Camped during that winter at Waverly,
Tennessee, and in the spring re-

FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1005

turned to Nashville, thence to Chattanooga, and was on Batty's Rockyface expedition, Tennessee,
Dalton Hill, Georgia, Resaca, Kingston, Big Shanty, in the Seven Day's fight, ordered on general
raid with Wilson, crossed Mississippi and Alabama, was in the battles of Tuscaloosa and Selma,
Alabama, thence to Macon, Georgia, there received news of Lincoln's death.  Was mustered out
at Macon, August 28, 1865. Mr. Chambers has held the office of assessor of the township and
was also trustee for several terms in Jasper county. He is identified with the Congregational
Church at Mitchellville, and his wife is also a member of the same.

CRAWFORD, H.-Farmer, section 5, P. 0. Mitchellville. Was born in Butler county, Ohio, in
1822, and was raised there until about nineteen years of age. He came to Iowa in 1854 and settled
in this township, where he now owns forty-two acres of land. He was married December 31,
1847, to Elizabeth McClay, daughter of Richard and Sarah McClay, of Wayne county, Indiana.
They have a family of four children living: Nancy Ann (born July 6, 1854), Eda (born October
24, 1856), James M. (born September 5, 1859) and Daniel P. (born September 21, 1864).
DAVIS, J. E.-Farmer, section 6, P. 0. Mitchellville. Was born in Erie county, New York, May
24, 1832 and made it his home until 1839, when, with his parents, he moved to Menard county,
Illinois. There resided until 1865, when he came to this State and settled on his present
homestead of 290 acres, all of which is under cultivation. He was married January 17, 1860, to
Miss M. R. Virgin, of Knox county, Ohio. They have two children: James W. and George B. Mr.
D. has held important township offices and has also figured conspicuously in state and county
elections.

DEARINGER, DAVID W.-Farmer, section -, P. 0. Altoona. Is the son of M. and Matilda
Dearinger and was born June 17, 1848 near Indianapolis, Indiana. He lived there until 1850,
when he came to Jasper county, Iowa, and lived there until 1874, when he took up his residence
in this county and township. Owns a farm of eighty acres. On the fifth of April, 1875, he was
married to Miss Carolina M. Voris. She is a daughter of John and Jane Voris, of Marion county,
Iowa. They have two children: Amos B. and Banner B. He and his wife are identified with the M.
E. Church.

FAIR, J. D.-Farmer, section 7, P. O. Altoona. Was born in VanWert county, Ohio, October 14,
1853, and was left an orphan at an early age. He was brought up by Mrs. McQueen, of Franklin
township. Has followed the occupation of farming from youth and owns a farm of seventy acres.
He was married October 3, 1875, to Elizabeth Haines, of Polk county, Iowa. They have one
child, Rosetta (born April 21, 1878).

HENNINGER, GEORGE-Farmer, section 33, P.O. Mitchellville. Was born in Medina county,
Ohio, April 13, 1843, and after leaving there removed with his family to Henry county, Illinois.
In 1868 he came to Iowa and settled where he now resides. He and his brother now own 240
acres of land. During the war he enlisted in February, 1865, in the Ninth Illinois cavalry, and
during the service was on detached duty, and was mustered out at Selma, Alabama.

HUDSON, W. T.-Farmer, section 32, P. 0. Altoona. Was born in Shelby county, Tennessee,
February 15, 1844, and when young he moved with his parents to Jefferson, Arkansas, and in
1851 to Saline county, same State. He came to Iowa in 1861 and settled in this community, and
in June,

1006 BIOGRAPHICAL.

1863, enlisted in the Eighth Iowa cavalry. Participated in the battles of Resaca, Lovejoy,
Casaville, and was with Sherman's March to Atlanta. Was taken prisoner with nearly all the
regiment and sent to Andersonville, where he remained until the close of the war. He returned
home and now owns 125 acres of land. He was married September 10, 1867, to Mrs. Eliza,
widow of the late John Brown, of St. Louis. By this union they have three children: Ada, Frank,
and Anna. Mrs. Hudson has one daughter by former marriage, Marian C. Brown. Mr. Hudson has
held several township offices, and is also a member of the G. A. R. Post at Mitchellville.

HUFFMAN, JOHN W.-Farmer, section 17, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born February 24, 1844, in
Dearborn county, Indiana, and in 1870 moved and settled in Johnson county, this State. There he
lived until 1871 he came to this county and settled in this township, and now owns 120 acres of
land, all in cultivation. In 1862 he enlisted in company B, Sixty eighth Indiana infantry.
Participated in the battles of Dalton,, Decatur and Nashville, and at Dalton was wounded. He was
sent to the hospital at Evansville, Indiana, and remained six months. Was promoted for an act of
bravery to color-bearer and first lieutenant, and held these positions until the close of the war.
His father served in the Eleventh Kentucky. Was captured at Marysville, Tennessee, and died in
Andersonville prison. October 29,. 1865, he was married to Martha Shackelford, of Ripley
county, Indiana.. They have three children: Laura E., Ira E., and George A., all living. Mr.,
Hufman has held the offices of township trustee, clerk, assessor, treasurer,. secretary, etc., for
several years.

HUNTER, C. E.-Farmer, section 17, P. O. Altoona. Was born in, Perry county, Ohio, May 14,
1842, and lived there until 1853, when, with his parents, he moved to Iowa and settled in Van
Buren county. There he resided until 1856 when he located in Hocking county, Ohio, and in 1858
he returned to Van Buren county, Iowa, and lived there until 1863. July 28th, of that year, he
enlisted in company C, Eighth Iowa cavalry. The regiment was detached as guard of the South
Railroad, quartered,. Sec. 49, and remained there until March, 1864. Was with Sherman on his
march to Atlanta, taken prisoner with nearly all the regiment, sent to Andersonville, and was
there and in other prisons about seven months. Was then removed to Goldsboro, where, in
company with six others, he effected his escape to a swamp eight miles west of Wilmington.
Four days after they were rescued by the Union soldiers. He was mustered out at Clinton, Iowa.
December 6,1866, he was married to Martha A. Vaught,, of Jefferson county, Iowa. They have
three children living: Leota F., Ira A., and Dora E. Have lost one child. Mr. Hunter owns
ninety-two acres of land. Has been clerk of township and held other important offices.

JAMIESON, JOHN-Farmer, section 6, P. O. Elkhart. Was born September 28,1841, at Cragie,
Scotland, and lived there until 1866, when he emigrated to America and first settled at La Porte
county,. Indiana. There he lived for three months when he came to this county,. locating where he
now resides. Owns a farm of 201 acres, all in cultivation. February 12, 1873, he was married to
Miss Anna, daughter of Andrew and Anna Brown, of Cragie, Scotland. They have two children
living: Anna (born July 14, 1876) and John B. (born April 26, 1880) Have lost two.

FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1007

JOHNSON, L. W.-Farmer, section 8, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Harrison county, Ohio,
November 25, 1826, and resided there until ten years of age, when he moved to Van Wert
county, same State, living there until 1856.. He then came to Iowa and settled on his present
location, and is the owner of about 500 acres of land. On the 1st of April, 1850, he was married
to Miss Nancy Scott, daughter of John and Elenor Scott, of Ohio, but formerly of Brook county,
Virginia. They have six children: Amos R., Maggie I., I. W., Ida I. and Davis living, and one
deceased. Mr. Johnson has held important county and township offices.

LACEY, ISAAC T.-Farmer and stock-raiser, section 25, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Carter
county, Tennessee, June 17,1821, and when young, engaged in farming, which he has followed
up to the present time. In 1854 he came to Iowa-settling in Jasper county, where he remained
until 1872, when he came to this county. He owns a farm of 250 acres. Has always taken an
active interest in all that pertains to the prosperity of the township. On the 19th of September,
1844, he was married to Miss Mary J. Boyd, of Carter county, Tennessee. They have seven
children living: Susan E. (born January 25, 1846), George N. (born July 30, 1859), James R.
(born June 6, 1852), Isaac F. (born November 11, 1856), William H. (born August. 28, 1858),
Ulysses S. (born December 6, 1865) and Jonathan L. (born December 17, 1868). They have, lost
six. Mr. L. and wife are prominent members of the M. E. Church.

LEE, EPHRAIM-Farmer and stock-raiser, section 25, P. O, Mitchellville. Was born in Wayne
county, Indiana, in 1832, and raised in Grant county until he was twenty-one years of age. He
came to Iowa in 1853 and settled in Warren county, where he lived one year, then moved and
settled in Polk county. He owns eighty-five acres of good land. He was married to Eliza Ann Lee,
of Polk county, in 1855. They have four children living: Flora Aletta, Laura Alice, Ishmael and
John. They have lost two.

LULL, FRED-Farmer, section 5, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Windsor county, Vermont,
June 10, 1834, and was there raised until sixteen years of age, then moved to Detroit, Michigan,
and in 1866 came to Iowa, settling in Franklin township. He now owns ninety acres of improved
land. Mr. Lull has held important township offices, and has always taken an active part in the
educational interests of the county. Has been appointed delegate to State and county conventions
(Republican). Has always taken an active part in the political interests of the county and been a
liberal supporter of religious associations, schools, etc. He came here with limited means and
success has attended his efforts. He was married August 25, 1856, to Mary E., daughter of John
and Margaret Davis, of La Salle county, Illinois. They have two children: Addie (born April 25,
1859) and Charles (born May 11, 1862

McCLEARY, F. M.-Farmer, section 27,P. O. Mitchellville. Was born near Leesburg, Indiana, on
the 26th of October, 1850, and in 1853 came to Iowa and was raised here. He was married
December 25, 1874, to Emma E. Kennedy, a daughter of William and Sarah Kennedy, of
Indiana. They are the parents of one child, Oliver E. (born December 8, 1875). He has taken an
interest in educational matters, and has held the office of road supervisor. Mr. McCleary owns
120 acres of land.

McGLEARY, ABEL J.-Farmer, section 22, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Kosciusko county,
Indiana, on the 30th of August, 1841, and when

1008 BIOGRAPHICAL.

twelve years of age removed to Iowa, locating in this township. Here he has grown to manhood a
farmer and now owns 265 acres of land. October 24, 1862, he was married to Emily C. Hedges of
this township and county, They have four children living: Jackson G., Eugene E., Susannah A.
and Samuel E. Have lost one. Mr. McCleary has been for some time connected with the M. E.
Church as class-leader, steward and superintendent of the Sabbath-school.

McQUEEN, R. S.-Farmer, section 15, P. O. Mitchellville. Is the son of Anthony and Ellen
McQueen, and was born February 11, 1857. His mother was the daughter of Richard and Mary
Pring, of Van Wert county, Ohio. She was married to Anthony McQueen, of Beaver county,
Pennsylvania, by which union they had six children: Richard S., Mary Elizabeth, William
Thomas, Albert, Almira and Matista. The farm of 160 acres is the undivided estate of the late
Anthony McQueen, father of the subject of our sketch. All the family are at present living upon
it.

MALONEY, DANIEL-Farmer, section 8, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Tepperary county,
Ireland, June 2I, 1832, and was raised there till 1848, then immigrated to the United States and
settled in Addison, Vermont. Has followed farming from youth. He came to Iowa February 28,
1856, and settled in Franklin township, where he now owns 860 acres of land, nearly all
improved. He was married August 15, 1857, to Bridget Brennen, daughter of James and Margaret
Brennen, of Donigal county,  Ireland. They have three children: James E. (born December 18,
1859), Daniel (born June 16, 1865) and John W. (born May 5, 1867). For the first two winters
after coming Mr. M. fought with the usual privations and hardships which fall to the lot of the
early settlers of a new country.

MARMON, PETER-Farmer, section 26, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Logan county, Ohio,
August 9, 1833, and was raised there until he was seventeen years of age. Followed school
teaching in youth, came to Iowa in 1855 and settled in Franklin township, where he now owns a
good farm of 200 acres, mostly improved. He was married March 7, 1867, to Mary Lee, of this
township. Have six children: Harlow W. (born December 28, 1867), Zilpah (born August 9,
1869), Ruth (born January 25, 1871), Frederick W. (born August 9, 1873), Victor B. (born
January 30, 1876), Nathan (born June 9, 1873). He enlisted August 4, 1862, in the Ninty-sixth
Ohio infantry, and was in the battles of Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, siege of Vicksburg,
Jackson, Miss., Grand Coteau, La. Was on Red River Expedition. Was wounded slightly at
Arkansas Post, taken prisoner at Grand Coteau and sent to Alexandria prison, there left six
months, when he was paroled and mustered out at Mobile, Alabama, July 6, 1865. Was promoted
to rank of second lieutenant and served until the close of the war. He was elected justice of the
peace in the fall of 1877, and still holds that position. Has held other important offices and has
been a delegate to both the State and county conventions, and has also taken active interests in
educational matters.

MATTERN, W. S.-Farmer and stock-raiser, section 25, P. O. Mitchellville. He was born in
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, January 8, 1848. He came with his parents to Iowa in 1856
and settled in Polk county. Commencing here with very limited means, he now owns an
improved farm of 240 acres of good land. He was married to Miss Mary Payne, of Filmore
county, Nebraska, October 9, 1873. They have two children living: Bertha (born December 4,
1875), Ralph (born July 10, 1878). They

FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1009

have lost one. Mr. Mattern is one of the most enterprising men of Polk county. He owns 160
acres of fine prairie land in Filmore county, Nebraska, which he is now having improved. He was
also identified among the many patriotic citizens, who helped save the Union. He enlisted the
summer of 1863 in the Eighth Iowa cavalry. Participated in the battles of Cassville, New Hope
Church, Lost Mountain, etc.

NOBLES, J. C.-Farmer, section 16, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Lexington, Kentucky,
March 30, 1824, and was raised in Edgar county, Illinois, until sixteen years of age, when, with
his parents, he settled in Green county, Wisconsin, and resided there until 1865. He came to Iowa
in 1865, settling in this county and township, where he now owns 100 acres of land, nearly all
improved. He married Miss Nancy Hammond July 9, 1846, daughter of John and Christine
Hammond, of Green county, Wisconsin. They have four children living: Lettie (born May 14,
1847), Flora (born September 6, 1857), Ella J. (born October 25, 1864), Effie D. (born May 4,
1872. Five are deceased.

PRENTICE, PITT-Farmer, section 16, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born on the 31st of July, 1845, a
native of McDonough county, Illinois, and resided there until 1853. He then removed with his
parents to this county, settling in this township, and is now the owner of an imtroved farm of 70
acres. On the 29th of August, 1872, he married Miss Sarah E. Young, daughter of John S. and
Mary Young, of this county. They have two children living: Fannie (born February 26, 1876) and
Edith (born January 31, 1878).

PRICE, C. W.-Farmer, section 20, P. O. Altoona. Was born in Rush county, Indiana, December
28, 1848, and was there raised. In 1869 he removed to Iowa and settled in this township, where
he has since resided, and now owns 80 acres of land. February 14, 1873, he married Miss Sarah
Keasey, daughter of S. H. and Sarah Keasey, of Douglas township, this county. Mr. Price has
held several offices in the township and is at present clerk of the same.

PRING, W. C.-Farmer, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Van Wert county, Ohio, and when
young commenced farming, which he has since followed. He came to Iowa in 1857 and settled in
Franklin township, Polk county, where he owns a farm of 120 acres. He married Catharine
Johnson, daughter of Joel and Lavinia Johnson. They have five children: Leroy, Gilbert,
Minevra, Theodore and Worth. Himself and brother were among the early settlers of the
township.

PRING, W. T.-Farmer, section 16, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born September 2, 1834, in Van
Wert county, Ohio, and is a son of Richard and Mary Pring. He remained there until 1857, when
he came to Iowa and settled in this township and now owns 40 acres of land. His marriage was in
1855, at which time Miss Adeline Brown, of Van Wert county, Ohio, became his wife. She was
formerly of Lawrence county, Pennsylvania. They have seven children: Emma J., Mary, Obadiah,
Frank G., Richard P., Lena B. and Laura. Mr. P. has held various offices in his township

PRUNTY, B. F.-Farmer, section 19, P. O. Altoona. Was born April 15, 1841, in Morgan county,
Illinois, and when young he moved to Marion county, this State. In 1845 he settled in Jasper
count, and in the fall of 1861, enlisted in the Fourteenth Iowa infantry. He was in the battles of
Forts Henry and Donelson, and at the latter place was taken sick

1010 BIOGRAPHICAL.

and removed to Mound City Hospital, and there remained three months. Then joined his
regiment at Corinth, Mississippi, and was in that battle, and also that of Jackson. The regiment
was sent to Davenport, Iowa, to reorganize, and from there he was sent to Cairo, Illinois, thence
to Vicksburg, and on the Red River Expedition and joined Sherman, but becoming ill, he was
sent to Keokuk where he remained until the end of the war. Was promoted to eighth corporal of
company E, and mustered out at Davenport in the fall of 1864. He settled in Camp township, this
county, and lived there until 1869 when he came to this township, and now owns a farm of 720
acres, in cultivation. In October, 1868, he was married to Susan A. Ingle of Jasper county. They
have five children: Charles O., Abbie A., Sadie, Bertie S. and Hattie S.; lost one.

SNYDER, S.-Farmer and stock-raiser, section 12, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Lehigh
county, Pennsylvania, November 8, 1820; there resided with his parents until about twelve years
old, when they moved to Crawford county of the same State, and was raised a farmer. In 1853, he
came to Iowa and settled in Jasper county, where he resided about one year; thence to Polk
county. He came here with very limited means, and now owns a valuable farm of 460 acres in a
good state of cultivation. He was married May 4, 1844, to Miss Catharine Hinker of Erie county,
Pennsylvania. They have seven children living: Azriah, Susannah, Adeline, Emma, Mary,
Andrew S. and Adelle. They have lost four. The lives of himself and family are closely
associated with the M. E. Church.

STOLL, JOHN F.-Farmer, section 30, P. O. Altoona. Was born in Wurtemberg, Germany,
October 20, 1830, and was there raised until twenty-three years of age, following the occupation
of turning in his youth. In 1853 he emigrated to the United States, locating in New York City,
where he remained one year, and then moved and settled in Philadelphia, there he resided two
years, when he went to Crawford county, Ohio, and in 1866 came to Iowa. He owns eighty acres
of land. He takes an active part in educational matters, and is identified with the Dunkard
Church, and is one of its liberal contributors. He was married to Caroline Staky of Crawford
county, Ohio, January 30, 1866. Have two children: Henry William (born October 30. 1866),
Albert Samuel (born December 16, 1868).

TRULLINGER, ELI-Farmer, section 34, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Chillicothe, Ohio,
August 31, 1816, and resided there until 1826, when he moved to Fountain county, Indiana. In
1843, he came to Iowa and settled in Jefferson county, and three years later came to his present
location. Owns a farm of 400 acres. September 10, 1838 he was married to Sarah A. Vankirk,
daughter of Ira and Mary Vankirk of Hamilton county, Ohio. She died August 23, 1876, leaving
six children living: Dennis, Sarah J., Emma A., Levissa S., Marinda and William J. Five are
deceased. He was one of the first settlers of the county, as well as of the township, and has been
identified with its best interests. Has held the office of township clerk, trustee and justice of the
peace, and also been identified with school organizations.

TYLER, D. E.-Farmer, section 35, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Claremont, New Hampshire,
November 21, 1824, and resided there until 1854. Followed the business of milling as his father
was engaged in that business, and in 1851 he came to Iowa. He remained about six months, when
he returned to New Hampshire, and stayed there until the spring of 1854, when he returned to
Iowa and settled in Franklin township, and he

FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 1011

now owns 110 acres of land, mostly improved. He was married January 25, 1848, to Miss Martha
J. Mitchell of Claremont, New Hampshire. They have four children living: Albert (born January
11, 1857), James born July 22, 1859), Ada M. (born October 29, 1860) and Henry S. (born
March 8, 1875). They have lost two. Mr. Tyler was elected justice of the peace in 1855, and held
the office for two years.

WALKER, S. H.-Farmer, section 84, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born at Claremont, New
Hampshire, February 23, 1820, and was raised there until 1857, when he came to Iowa and
bought forty acres of land in Franklin township. He returned to New Hampshire, after a stay of
about ten months, and remained there until the spring of 1859, when he moved his family to his
farm in this township. He followed the occupation of mason in his youth, until after his farm was
all improved. Now owns 220 acres of land, nearly all under cultivation. Was married April 26,
1842, and has five children living: Thyelman (born June 3, 1842), Adillion E. (born April 31,
1849), Addie A. (born April 26, 1854), Lizzie E. (born August 6, 1863) and Matt. D. (born
January 1, 1865). Mr. Walker was elected justice of the peace in 1860, which office he held two
years, has also been identified with the educational interests of his township.

WELLS, J. P.-Farmer, section 6, P. O. Elkhart. Born in Fleming county, Kentucky, June 2, 1826,
and raised in Rush county, Indiana, until 1857, when he came to Iowa and settled in Polk county.
He owns eighty acres of land. He was elected justice of peace in 1879, and held other township
offices. He was married June 2, 1853, to Miss Ann Remington of Rush county, Indiana. They
have four children: Leoly F., William B., Gamaliel J. and Charles S. Mr. Wells and wife are
identified with the M. E. Church, of which he has been steward and Sabbath-school
superintendent.

WIGMINN, F.-Farmer, section 17, P. O. Altoona. Was born in Germany, April 22, 1838, and has
followed farming from youth. Immigrated to the United States in 1866 and settled in La Porte
county, Indiana, where he resided four months, and then came to Iowa and located in Franklin
township, where he now own 120 acres, about all under cultivation. He was married November
fi, 1879, to Joanna Riley, daughter of Jacob and Mary  Riley of Lee county, this State.
WILSON, JOHN-Farmer, section 33, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born February 24, 1827, in
Washington county, this State, and there resided for some time. Then came to this county and
took up his residence in Franklin township, and has since lived here. Owns 260 acres of land.
March 11, 1862, Mary, daughter of Samuel and Mary Hedges, of this county, became his wife.
They have six children: Sarah E., Emma J., Nettie A., Samuel G. and Rosa B. living, and one
deceased. Mr. Wilson has been prominently identified with the educational interests of the
township.

WOODROW, I. S.-Farmer, section 23, P. O. Mitchellville. Was born in Hendricks county,
Indiana, February 2, 1850. He came with his parents to Iowa, when but four years age, and settled
in this county. Owns a farm of 60 acres of land. He has served as a member of the board of
supervisors, and has held other township offices. He has taken an active part in the educational
interests of the county. He has always been a liberal contributor of all religious associations. He
was married to Miss Mary

1012 BIOGRAPHICAL.

Pring, of this county. They have one child. Their religious preference is with the Christian
Church.

WOODROW, W. H.-Farmer, section 28, P. O. Mitchellville. Born in Wayne Co., Indiana, March
29, 1836, but was raised in Hendricks county until 1854. He then came to Iowa, settling in this
township, where he now owns sixty-two acres of land. He was married August 14, 1866, to Miss
Elizabeth Lee, of Franklin township. They have four children: Anna E. (born May 17, 1867) and
Mary (born September 15, 1875). Have lost two. He enlisted in 1862, in the Twenty-eighth Iowa,
and was in the battles of Vicksburg, Black River Bridge, Champion's Hill, Port Gibson and
Spanish Fort. Was taken sick at Vicksburg, Mississippi, and sent to Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis,
and remained about three months, when he returned and joined his regiment at Carlton, near New
Orleans. Was on march from Vicksburg around Black River. Returned to Vicksburg, and was
sent to help General Banks, on his Red River expedition. Was mustered out at Hamburg, Texas,
in 1856. Returned to this county in August of the same year.

 

 


Last update:  12 April 2007