Alumni

 

, Ph.D 2013: Chelsea received her Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Her dissertation research examined the evouiton of sexual dimorphism in hummingbirds, and used phylogenetic comparative approaches to evaluate macroevolutionary patterns of phenotypic diversification. She is currently a lecturer at Alamosa State University.

Dr. Gabriel Rivera, NSF Postdoc 2010-2013: Gabe is a biomechanist interested in the ecology and evolution of vertebrate form and funciton. His research focuses on the mechanics of turtle swimming. He is currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Swarthmore College.

Dr. James Church, Ph.D. 2011: Jim received his Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. His dissertation research combined niche modeling, fieldwork and simulation approaches to investigate how adaptation to the local environment, and species interactions regulate an organism's niche and maintaion species' distributions and boundaries. He is currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Stout.

Dr. Jennifer Deitloff, Ph.D. 2008: Jenn received her Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (Adams and Valenzuela co-advised). Her dissertation research examined the behavioral interactions of Pletodon salamanders in Ohio in an effort to understand the ecological factors allowing their coexistence. Jenn is currently a postdoctoral researcher in entomology at Iowa State University.

Dr. Erin Myers, Ph.D. 2008: Erin received her Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (Adams and Janzen co-advised). Her dissertation research examined the molecular phylogenetics and shape variation in the eye-bar patterns of map turtles (genus: Graptemys) in an effort to elucidate the role of eye-bar patterns in sexual selection and speciation in this genus. Erin is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Houston.

Dr. Michael Collyer, Postdoc 2004-2007: Mike is a quantitative evolutionary ecologist interested in understanding patterns of phenotypic change. While in the lab, Mike and Dean developed methods for quantifying and comparing patterns of phenotypic change. Mike is currently an assistant professor at Western Kentucky University.

Dr. Melinda Cerney, Ph.D. 2005: Melinda received her Ph.D. in Human Computer Interaction (Adams and Vance co-advised), and was the first graduate of that program. In her dissertation research she developed methods for assessing biomechanical motion, and developed such routines for immersive virtual reality environments. Melinda is currently employed at Microsoft.

Dr. Tibisay Escalona, Ph.D. 2003 (Univ. Mo. St. Louis): Tiby completed her Ph.D. at the University of Missouri, St. Louis under the direction of Dr. Louiselle (Adams co-advised). Her dissertation research examined maternal effects, nesting behavior, and reproductive patterns in the freshwater river turtle Podocnemis unifilis in Venezuela. Tiby is currently a postdoctoral researcher the CIMAR institute in Portugal.

Saad Arif, M.S. 2005: Saad completed his M.S. degree in EEB in 2005. For his M.S. research Saad examined the ecological processes regulating the distributions of two woodland salamanders (Plethodon cinereus & P. hubrichti). Saad completed his Ph.D. and is currently a postdoc at Max Planck in Germany.

Kara Butterworth, M.S. 2003: Kara completed her Master's degree in BCB in 2003 (Wendel and Adams co-advised). For her M.S. research Kara examined the origin of 'fuzz' wild and domesticated cotton plants. She compared cell origination, development, and size and shape across various genetic and polyploid lines. Kara is currently a biology teacher at Clear Creek High School in Evergreen, CO.

Jennifer Donnelly, Jennifer Donnelly, M.S. 2003: Jennifer (Poppet) completed her Master's degree in EEB in 2003. For her research she examined patterns of skull allometry (size vs. shape) in a population of guanacos in southern Chile. Because skulls collected in the field for mortality estimation are often damaged, Jennifer investigated the degree to which missing data could be statistically imputed in a study of skull size as an estimator of age in the guanaco (Lama guanicoe), and whether skulls in this species are sufficient, in the absence of other data, for estimation of juvenile mortality. Poppet is a lecturer at Grandview University.

Aspen Garry, M.S. 2003: Aspen completed her Master's degree in EEB in 2003 (Adams and Naylor co-advised). For her M.S. research Aspen examined patterns of shape variation through the fossil record. Using a phylogeny of extant shark species, Aspen compared estimates of shark tooth shapes through the phylogeny to the shapes of known fossil shark teeth, to determine whether current approaches can accurately predict values along the nodes of a phylogeny. Aspen is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of Colorado.