Nutrition Case Study Report

 
          Research and write a report (2 pages of typed text followed by a bibliography) on one or more case studies concerning nutrition in the developing world.  Your case study can focus on any of a wide variety of relevant topics.  Topics may include but are not limited to the following examples: the nutritional status or diets of individuals or groups in a region; nutritional problems (PEM, micronutrient deficiencies, secondary malnutrition, overnutrition, etc.); specific foods that impact nutrition in the developing world (rice, cassava, plantains, QPM, etc.); nutrition at different lifecycle stages (infants, pregnancy, elderly, etc.);  the impacts of nutrition (on health, education, work, etc.); assessment, treatment, research or education about nutrition; etc.

Your report must directly relate to nutrition in the developing world, and include an ethical discussion of the topic presented as well as the social, political, economic, and environmental implications of the topic where appropriate.  In the ethical discussion you must make an ethical argument using ethical theories and or principles (rights, utilitarianism, justice, beneficence, non-maleficence, etc.) Reports must be well-researched, informative, thought-provoking, and based on the synthesis of facts and ideas from a wide variety of authoritative references.   Grades usually reflect the amount of effort put into the project.  Do not use class lecture materials or the book as references for your report.  

Your report must have at least three references, and at least TWO of them must be scholarly references (peer reviewed journal articles),  (hint: find scholarly references on Google Scholar or PubMed).  References should be discussed in the context of the paper, listed in the bibliography, and cited in the text of your report (by number or by author and date).  Scholarly references in the bibliography must include the authors, name of article, journal, volume, page, and date (See bibliography instructions below). To have access to most scholarly journals online, you must login to your account at the ISU Library.  Go to the Library home page (http://www.lib.iastate.edu/info/6000) and then to My Account.  Follow the link to Remote Access where it will explain how to login.   You will need your ISU Card number and will have to set a PIN.

 FSHN students will add their report to their portfolio.


Grading Rubric:


A:  Well-researched, informative, thoughtful presentation of your topic and excellent analysis of the ethical, social, political, economic, and environmental implications of it.  Report integrates and interrelates your topic with other concepts and ideas covered in class relating to poverty, ethics, agriculture, women’s status, etc.  Scholarly references are used and discussed in the context of the report.  Paper reflects a high level of effort and engagement in the topic.

B:  Informative presentation of your topic and good analysis of the ethical, social political, economic, and environmental implications of it.   Does more than a minimal job of integrating and interrelating your topic with other concepts and ideas covered in class relating to poverty, ethics, agriculture, women’s status, possible policy changes, etc.  Scholarly references are used and discussed in the context of the report.  Papers reflect a significant level of effort and engagement in the topic.

C.  Fair presentation of your topic and analysis of the ethical, social, political, economic, and environmental implications of it.  Integrates the topic with other concepts and ideas covered in class relating to poverty, ethics, agriculture, women’s status and policy changes.  Scholarly references are used and discussed in the context of the report.  Papers reflect an adequate level of effort and engagement in the topic.

 
Bibliography:

1. Citations in the text:

When you write about ideas or scientific information presented in an article, you must cite the article where you got the information.  Try to avoid the use of direct quotations. Instead, as a science writer, your job is to explain the science to the reader, and to cite the source of the information.  Cite publications in the text with the author’s last name and the year, in parentheses.  For two authors, use both names. For multiple authors, use "et al." after the first author’s name.  If you mention the author in the text, cite the year in parentheses.  These citations are designed to allow one to look up the reference easily in the back of the paper by name and date.

Examples:

1.   The starch granules are normally elongated in the milk stage (Brown, 1956).

2.   Hendrich and others (2009) reported . . .

3.  …other work (Ford and Fuchs, 2004) has shown that…

1.                  …and recent work (Birt et al., 2010) has shown that ...

2.                  …several investigators (Brown, 1956; Birt et al., 2010) have shown that…

5.   …new developments in technology (IFT, 2005) indicate...

 

2.  Format for References at the end:

List only those references cited in the text. References should be flush with the left margin, listed alphabetically by the first author's last name.  Note:   For Scholarly References, the Authors, Title, Journal Number, Volume and Pages are ESSENTIAL INFORMATION.  The URL is not sufficient.   Science Direct is not a journal, it is simply a web source for journal articles!

 

Scholarly Journal Article (internet source): Authors (LastName FI,). Year. Article title. Journal title,Volume number: inclusive pages. URL; date accessed..

Example:

Dakwa S, Sakyi-Dawson E, Diako C, Annan NT, Amoa-Awua WK. 2005. Effect of boiling and roasting on the fermentation of soybeans into dawadawa (soy-dawadawa). Int. J. Food Microbiol. 104:1, pp. 69-82.  Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/01681605; Accessed August 31, 2005.

   

Scholarly Journal Article (print source): Authors (LastName FI,). Year. Article title. Journal title, Volume number (issue number, if available): inclusive pages. 

Example:

Smith JB, Jones LB, Racklly KR. 1999. Maillard browning in apples. J Food Sci 64(4):512-8.


Scholarly Book : Author(s) or [editor(s)]. Year. Title. Place of publication: publisher name. Number of pages.

Example:

Spally MR, Morgan SS. 1989. Methods of food analysis. 2nd ed. New York: Elsevier. 682 p.

 

Internet Article: Author(s) if available (LastName FI,) or abbreviated name of website used in text citation, and full name of website in parentheses.  Year.  Article title.  Retrieval date. URL.

Example:

IFT (Institute of Food Technologists) Daily News Reader. January 2005 Archive. 2005.  Bayer and Cargill to produce specialty canola oil.  Retrieved September 1, 2005.  http://www.ift.org/cms/

 
Sa