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Center for Excellence in the Arts and Humanities


Seminars and Workshops


The Center for Excellence in the Arts and Humanities (CEAH) sponsors faculty seminars and workshops on focused topics. The events offer Iowa State University arts and humanities faculty the opportunity to learn about funding opportunities and grantsmanship, to present their research in an interdisciplinary setting or to discuss topics related to the CEAH's focus on faculty research. The Office of the Vice President for Research and Economic development (VPRED) offers a full range of workshops for faculty focusing on the development of competitive grant proposals each year: Faculty Orientation and Faculty Development Programs.


Fall Semester

Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities


Civility in a Troubled Economy
Jim Leach, Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities
Tuesday, November 8, 2011
4:00 PM @ Kocimski Auditorium
101 College of Design

Jim Leach is the ninth chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Prior to being nominated by President Obama for the post, Leach was a professor at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University and interim director of the Institute of Politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Leach's brief stint in academia was preceded by thirty years of service as one of Iowa's representatives in the United States Congress, where he chaired the Banking and Financial Services Committee, the Subcommittee on Asian and Pacific Affairs, and the Congressional-Executive Commission on China. Leach attended Princeton University, the School of Advanced International Studies of Johns Hopkins, and the London School of Economics.


Cosponsored By:
College of Design
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences
English
Vice President for Research & Economic Development
Committee on Lectures (funded by GSB)


Science Communication Colloquium


Critical Thinking About Conspiracies
Kevin deLaplante (Philosophy)
Thursday, September 1
3:40 - 5:00 pm
215 Ross Hall

Conspiracy theorists are often skilled at defending their ideas with a semblance of reason. SciComm@ISU project team member Kevin deLaplante will share his work on how principles of critical thinking can help sort out conspiracy claims. This project was driven in part by some of the responses he's received from the audience of his podcasts at the Critical Thinker Academy; he'll be talking about his public scholarship as well.

This is the first Science Communication @ISU colloquium of the year. This research is funded through the CEAH Seed Grant for Collaborative Work.

Patterns of Mass Media coverage of science and technology: Hoopla Theory and Beyond
Eric Abbott (Greenlee)
Thursday, September 29
3:40 - 5:00 pm
310 Carver Hall

Mass media coverage of scientific innovations and controversies tends to follow regular patterns, both in terms of volume of coverage, tone, and sources used. Hoopla theory suggests that scientific innovations often begin with a spurt of highly positive coverage, followed by a gradual decline in coverage that is characterized by more negative information. The presentation will examine coverage of both scientific controversies and innovations, and will compare how hoopla theory and other theories explain them.

Reconstructing the Good Farmer Identity
Jean McGuire (Agronomy)
Thursday, October 27
3:40 - 5 pm
310 Carver Hall Conference Room

Many U.S. farmers do not recognize how their management decisions affect water quality, and therefore, are not taking action to address the impacts their practices have had, and continue to have, on surface water, and groundwater degradation. A group of farmers in Northeast Iowa have demonstrated that it is possible to address water and soil quality issues while maintaining efficiency and profitability. We apply two feedback models, identity control and performance-based environmental management, to show the processes whereby these farmers came to recognize the environmental impacts of their farm practices on the surface and ground water in their watershed and then adopted practices to reduce the pollutants leaving their farms. The next phase of the development of the Good Farmer concept is being tested in two USDA-funded climate change adaptation and mitigation research projects currently underway in the United States Corn Belt.

Science, politics and environmental management: How to use fur seals to claim the Bering Sea
Clark Wolf (Philosophy)
Thursday, December 1
3:40 - 5 pm
Room: 215 Ross Hall

This talk will consider the 1892 Fur Seal Negotiations in Paris, a huge international affair to which scientists from different nations contributed information on the sustainable management of Bering sea animal populations. In the end, an agreement was reached (but not until the resources in question had been driven almost to extinction) and a management regime was implemented, including the US Marine Mammal Protection Act. This negotiation may provide a model (or a cautionary tale) for evaluating and perhaps improving the climate negotiation process.



Grant Writing Workshops


The registration deadline for WORKSHOP III: One-on-One Sessions on Writing or Revising Grants is August 22nd. The registration deadline for all other workshops is August 31st.


FUNDAMENTALS OF GRANT WRITING SEMINAR: How to Write a Winning Grant Proposal
Joe and Lynn Jelinski (Sunshine Consultants International)
Monday, September 19, 2011
9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Room: Sun Room, Memorial Union

Who is this workshop for?
Junior faculty and postdoctoral fellows will benefit most, but seasoned academics, especially those with proposals to revise, will also find helpful information. The concepts are universal and apply equally to the arts and humanities and to the sciences, mathematics, engineering and the social sciences. This workshop is a prerequisite for the subsequent NSF-specific and NIH-specific workshops and the one-on-one sessions.

More Info



WORKSHOP I: Writing a Compelling Grant Proposal to NSF
Joe and Lynn Jelinski (Sunshine Consultants International)
Tuesday, September 20, 2011
1:30 - 5:00 pm
Room: 114 Marston

Who is this workshop for?
Junior faculty and postdoctoral fellows will benefit most, but seasoned academics, especially those with proposals to resubmit, will also find helpful tidbits of information. It is assumed that participants will have attended the general workshop How to Write a Winning Grant Proposal.

More Info


WORKSHOP II: Writing a Compelling Grant Proposal to NIH
Joe and Lynn Jelinski (Sunshine Consultants International)
Wednesday, September 21, 2011
9:00 am - 12:30 pm
College of Veterinary Medicine; Room 1521 (new CVS Building)

Who is this workshop for?
Junior faculty and postdoctoral fellows will benefit most, but seasoned academics, especially those with proposals to revise, will also find helpful tidbits of information. It is assumed that participants will have attended the general workshop How to Write a Winning Grant Proposal.

More Info


WORKSHOP III: One-on-One Sessions on Writing or Revising Grants
Joe and Lynn Jelinski (Sunshine Consultants International)
Thursday and Friday - all day; September 22 - 23, 2011
9:00 am - 12:00 pm, 1:30 - 5:30 pm
Room: TBD

Who is this workshop for?
This workshop is for anyone who would like private and intense coaching on writing or revising a grant. It is assumed that participants will have attended the general workshop How to Write a Winning Grant Proposal.

More Info




The Works in Progress Lecture Series


The Works in Progress lecture series (WiPS) brings together faculty from the College of Design and Liberal Arts and Sciences to talk about their work in a supportive environment. Currently in its fifth semester, it is a great place to try out new ideas or give a trial run of a conference talk. Talks run from 20-45 minutes and are followed by a collegial Q&A session. The intent is to learn more about each other's research and to foster ties across the two colleges.


Sites of Superstition on US College Campuses
Michael Bailey (History)
Tuesday, September 20
6:00 pm
130 Design

Three-Dimensional Depictions of War
Emily Godbey (Art History)
Tuesday, October 4
6:00 pm
130 Design

Goethe's Failed Project: Mining, Risk, Management
William Carter (German)
Tuesday, October 18
6:00 pm
130 Design

Political Economies of Landscape Change: Places of Integrative Power
Doug Johnston (Landscape Architecture)
Tuesday, November 15
6:00 pm
130 Design

Embodying Reconciliation: American Indian Women as Political Actors on the Northern Plains
Christina Gish Hill (American Indian Studies)
Tuesday, December 6
6:00 pm
130 Design


Spring Semester

Interdisciplinary Roundtables


Crossing Boundaries/Crossing Cultures: Identity, Ethnicity, and Borderlands
Tuesday, January 24th, 2012
4:10 - 5:30 pm
Room: 302 Catt Hall

Recent scholarship in the humanities and social sciences has expanded in the area of migration, borderlands, and local identity vis-a-vis large-scale state structures or empires. This roundtable highlights the work of ISU faculty who come to this academic arena from a variety of interdisciplinary methodological and geo-political analytical frameworks. Participants will look at literary and cultural derivatives of ethnicity in Central America, ethnic tensions in the southwest of the US, borderland disputes in East Asia and Latin America, and the politics of culture in SE Europe.


Participants:
Brian Behnken, Assist. Prof., History
Xiaoyuan Liu, Professor, History
Eliza Rizo, Assist. Prof., World Languages and Cultures
Max Viatori, Assist. Prof., Anthropology
Zora Zimmerman, Assoc. Dean of LAS, English



Donald Benson Memorial Lecture Fund for Literature, Science, and the Arts


Writing the American West: History, Environment, and People
Wednesday, April 4, 2012
10:00 - 11:30 am
*9:15 am - Coffee and light refreshments*
Ensminger Room, Kildee Hall

Prof. Elliott West will lead an informal workshop as part of the Donald Benson Memorial Lecture Fund for Literature, Science, and the Arts about his process and books. Afterward, he will have a question-and-answer period about his methodology.

The West Before Lewis and Clark: Three Lives
Wednesday, April 4th, 2012
7:00 pm
Sun Room, Memorial Union

Standard histories of the American West begin with the journey of Lewis and Clark and their Corps of Discovery in 1804-06. In fact, those famous explorers were entering the West during a time of vibrant change. Dr. West will explore a world before Lewis and Clark through the stories of three individuals:a French teenaged boy, a Missouria Indian woman and a young New Mexican mother.

More Info

Summer

Between Scientists & Citizens: Assessing Expertise In Policy Controversies
Sally Jackson (Communication, University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana)
Massimo Pigliucci (Philosophy, Lehman College, CUNY)
June 1-2, 2012
Room: TBD

This conference will focus on expertise in policy controversies from across the disciplines focused on argumentation, reasoning, rhetoric, communication and deliberation.

For further information, contact Jean Goodwin (goodwin@iastate.edu). For consideration, submit a 250 word abstract with an additional 5-10 item bibliography, and a separate cover page with complete contact information, to GPSSARG@gmail.com by October 31, 2011.





CEAH Past Seminars, Workshops and Symposia