Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2009-2011 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

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World Languages and Cultures

100 |400 |Graduate Courses |500 |

Mark Rectanus, Chair of Department
University Professor (Emeritus): Joanna Courteau
Professors: Bratsch-Prince, Henry, Leonard, Matibag, M. Rectanus
Professors (Emeritus): Bernard, Dow, Frink, J. N. Lacasa
Associate Professors: Allen, Amidon, Gasta, Mariner, Mook, Mu
Associate Professors (Emeritus): Dial, Nabrotzky, Thogmartin
Associate Professor (Adjunct): Rosenbusch
Assistant Professors: Dominguez-Castellano, Haywood-Ferreira, L'Hote, Mesropova, Pardo-Ballester, Rizo-Arbuckle, Vander Lugt, Weber-Feve
Assistant Professors (Emeritus): Chatfield, Johnson
Assistant Professor (Adjunct): Rodriguez
Instructor (Adjunct): Kottman
Senior Lecturers: Martin, Taoutel, Waldemer
Lecturers: Amling, Baszczynski, Cai, Galarraga-Oropeza, Goodman, Guthrie, Looney, Meyers, E. Rectanus, Rosenstock, Shi, Wilhelm, Zwanziger

Undergraduate Study

Curriculum: World language study should be an integral part of an academic program for most students. The theoretical understanding of and practical experience in language underlie many intellectual disciplines that try to meet the complex problems of contemporary society. Courses offered by the Department of World Languages and Cultures are designed to develop students' understanding of a second culture through the language spoken by that culture.

Upon the completion of their program of studies in the Department of World Languages and Cultures, majors with a concentration in French, German, Russian Studies, or Spanish will demonstrate proficiency in five goal areas: Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities. Students will be able to: (a) use their concentration language to present and interpret information and to communicate both orally and in writing; (b) demonstrate an understanding of the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of the culture(s) in which their concentration language is spoken; (c) demonstrate their ability to acquire information and further their knowledge through their concentration language; (d) demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language and the concept of culture by making comparisons with their own language and culture(s); and (e) demonstrate a desire to become a life-long learner of their concentration language.

Graduates will achieve both linguistic proficiency and cultural literacy through the study of the language and culture of their program. Linguistic proficiency entails the ability to function effectively in the target language and the ability to communicate competently with native speakers of the target language. Students of Latin and Ancient Greek demonstrate proficiency by becoming able to read the languages and to translate from these languages into clear and idiomatic English. Cultural literacy includes a general knowledge of the culture's history, familiarity with its literature, and basic knowledge of its social and political institutions.

The Department offers a major in World Languages and Cultures with two options, leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree: 1) Languages and Cultures with a Concentration in French, German, Russian Studies, or Spanish; 2) Languages and Cultures for Professions (as a second major only) with a Concentration in French, German, Russian Studies, or Spanish. The Department offers minors in Chinese Studies, French, German, Latin, Russian Studies, and Spanish; and instruction in Arabic, Classical Greek, and Portuguese. The Department also houses the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences' Program in Classical Studies.

A full statement of requirements for majors and minors may be obtained from the Department. For a complete statement of all the college degree requirements, see Liberal Arts and Sciences, Curriculum. Current and detailed information about the Department, including placement information, is available on-line at www.language.iastate.edu .

Policies

Students who have had formal training in world languages offered at Iowa State may obtain credit by passing appropriate examinations. Students with native fluency in languages taught at Iowa State may not enroll in or take the Exam for Credit in elementary or intermediate courses (100 and 200 level) in their native language. Students are considered to have native fluency if their ethnic first language as indicated on the matriculation form is the language in which they wish to enroll. Students are also considered to have native fluency if they have had substantial attendance at a secondary school or university where the language of instruction is the language in which they wish to enroll at ISU. Students with native fluency may be eligible to enroll in literature and civilization courses in their native language at the 300 level or above; such students must also consult the department office to determine eligibility for advanced composition and conversation courses (300 level and above). Students who have completed three or more years of high-school world language study may not enroll in or receive credit for 101-102 in those languages; credit may be obtained by passing the appropriate Exam for Credit or by completing an advanced sequence (200-level or higher) in that language. 101-102 may not be taken on a remedial basis.

Students who have completed two years but less than three years of a single high-school world language may not enroll in a 101 course in that language. These students may enroll in either a 102 course in that language, or in the case of Spanish, Span 97. Before enrolling in either Span 97 or a 102 language course, students are recommended to take the on-line placement test available at www.language.iastate.edu . Span 97 is designed for students who need additional remedial work in the language at the first-year level (101-102) and are not planning to continue their language study at the second-year 201-202 level. Students who complete Span 97 with a passing grade will have fulfilled the LAS world language requirement. Students who have completed Span 97 and wish to pursue further study in Spanish at the 201-202 level may enroll in 102.

Students with disabilities who need to satisfy the world language requirement may direct questions to their academic adviser and the Disability Resource Office.

Credit by examination in the Department of World Languages and Cultures for courses numbered 101, 102, 201, and 202 is available only to students who are not currently enrolled in the course. Credit by examination for other courses in the Department is not normally available.

The Department of World Languages and Cultures participates in the Iowa Regents' world language summer study abroad programs in France, Peru and Spain. The Department also offers summer programs in Greece, Russia, Spain and Mexico; and semester study abroad programs in Mexico and Spain. Information concerning these programs can be obtained directly from the Department.

Language and literature courses numbered 300 and above are principally taught in the target language; courses numbered in the 270s, 370s, and 470s are taught in English. For courses taught in English about Ancient Greek and Rome, see Classical Studies. Students may not take intermediate (200 level) courses for credit after successfully completing any advanced (300/400 level) course, except those in the 370 series or courses taught in English translation. Students who have successfully completed any course in the intermediate (200 level) sequence may not take a lower-numbered course in that sequence for a grade.

Students at all levels of foreign language study will have access to the Language Studies Resource Center, located in 3142 Pearson. The Resource Center contains an extensive collection of world

language materials, including audio-visual materials, electronic resources, music, books, language specific software and hardware, and other course-related materials.

Materials fees: Each student enrolled in a 100- through 400- level world language course is assessed a materials and professional support fee of $25.00 per course. No student will be charged more than $50.00 per semester, regardless of the number of world language courses in which she or he is enrolled for the semester. If a student drops a course subject to the fee by the 15th day of the semester the fee for that course will not be assessed.

Communication Proficiency requirement: The Department requires a grade of C- or better in each of Engl 150 and 250 (250H), and a grade of C or better in any course numbered between 370 and 379 (with the exception of Rus 375) taught by the Department of World Languages and Cultures or the interdepartmental program in Classical Studies.

Languages and Cultures for Professions (LCP)

Students with primary majors in the College of Business or the College of Engineering are encouraged to complete an LCP second major option in World Languages and Cultures with a concentration in French, German, Russian Studies, Spanish, or Chinese Studies (minor only). The primary objective of the LCP option is to provide learning environments within which students can achieve global literacy, linguistic proficiency, and inter-cultural competence. In the LCP curriculum, students will learn how professions are shaped by social and cultural forces and, alternatively, how professions shape society. In courses on contemporary culture and society, students will identify and analyze issues dealing with the complex interrelationships of languages and cultures and consider how they may affect their chosen profession. Students will experience living and working in diverse cultural settings through study abroad and internship opportunities offered through the LCP program and/or in collaboration with the Colleges of Business and Engineering. Students enrolled in the LCP second major option may receive non-graded academic credit for the successful completion of internships (WLC courses numbered 499 in each language area).

For the LCP second major option, students will complete 30 credits within their language concentration beyond the fourth-semester level, selected from the list of approved LCP core courses and electives designated for their respective college curricula in either Business or Engineering. Students may only enroll in the LCP option as a second major and may not graduate with the LCP option in the WLC major alone.

Students in the College of Business may combine course work in the International Business (IB) Secondary Major with course work in LCP by selecting from a list of approved options. Students should consult their academic adviser in the College of Business and the WLC advisor for coursework and international experience that fulfill requirements in both the IB and LCP major options. (IB) Major

Graduate Study

The Department of World Languages and Cultures offers course work leading to a graduate minor in French, German, Latin, Russian Studies or Spanish. The graduate minor in each of these languages is designed to provide an opportunity for graduate students to further their knowledge of ?that language to complement work in their major disciplines. The graduate minor provides formal recognition of student achievement and expertise in one of the languages above. Graduate minor credits are also offered in Greek.

Graduate Minor

Program Requirements:

a. Prerequisites: Graduate students who wish to minor in one of the languages above must have 400-level proficiency in that language. When this is not the case, the student may be required to take a language course below the 400-level, which would not count towards the graduate minor requirements.

b. Course Requirements: For the M.A. or M.S.: Three courses in the language of the minor. No more than three credits may be in courses numbered 401, 402, and 403. For the Ph.D.: Four courses in the language of the minor which must include at least one three credit course at the 500 level. No more than three credits may be in courses numbered 401, 402, or 403. At least two courses for the M.A. and the Ph.D. minors must be taken in residence at Iowa State University. Papers written for these courses are expected to have a content and depth commensurate with the graduate status of the student.

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

WLC 119. Introduction to World Languages. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3.Study of language diversity and the personal, social and political effects of diversity. Language families, attitudes toward language and dialects, language and culture, multilingualism, foreign language learning, written codes, official languages, and language policy.

WLC 417. Student Teaching. (Cross-listed with C I). Cr. 8-12. F.S.Prereq: Admission to teacher education, approval of coordinator during semester before student teaching. Evaluation of instruction, lesson planning, and teaching in the liberal arts and sciences.
G. Foreign Language (Same as C I 417G.)

WLC 484. Technology, Globalization and Culture. (Dual-listed with 584). (Cross-listed with M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: senior classification for 484; graduate classification for 584. Cross-disciplinary examination of the present and future impact of globalization with a focus on preparing students for leadership roles in diverse professional, social, and cultural contexts. Facilitate an understanding of the threats and opportunities inherent in the globalization process as they are perceived by practicing professionals and articulated in debates on globalization. Use of a digital forum for presenting and analyzing globalization issues by on-campus and off-campus specialists.

WLC 486. Methods in Elementary School World Language Instruction. (Cross-listed with C I, Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 25 credits in a world language. Current educational methods and their application in the elementary school classroom. Special emphasis on planning, evaluation, and teaching strategies. Nonmajor graduate credit.

WLC 487. Methods in Secondary School World Language Instruction. (Cross-listed with Ling, C I). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 25 credits in a world language, admission to the teacher education program. Theories and principles of contemporary world language learning and teaching. Special emphasis on designing instruction and assessments for active learning.

WLC 491. Language in Motion. (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable.Prereq: Minimum of six ISU credits for study abroad and/or internship abroad and completion of at least a fourth-semester (202 level) foreign language course or equivalent. First 8 weeks of semester only. Enrollment by instructor permission only. Students returning from study abroad prepare presentations about an aspect of the culture they experienced and spend one day in a high school where they give their presentations to multiple classes. Satisfactory/fail only.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

WLC 584. Technology, Globalization and Culture. (Dual-listed with 484). (Cross-listed with M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: senior classification for 484; graduate classification for 584. Cross-disciplinary examination of the present and future impact of globalization with a focus on preparing students for leadership roles in diverse professional, social, and cultural contexts. Facilitate an understanding of the threats and opportunities inherent in the globalization process as they are perceived by practicing professionals and articulated in debates on globalization. Use of a digital forum for presenting and analyzing globalization issues by on-campus and off-campus specialists.