Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2009-2011 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

Search for classes offered this term

Catalog Index

A| B| C | D| E| F| G| H| I | J| K| L| M| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z

Political Science (Pol S)

100 |200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses |500 |600 |

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

Pol S 101. Orientation to Political Science. (2-0) Cr. 1. F.S.Prereq: Political Science and Open Option majors only or permission of the instructor. Introduction to the discipline and sub-fields of Political Science, including an introduction to analytical thinking, and research skills relevant to political science. Orientation to university, college, and departmental structure, policies, and procedures; student roles and responsibilities; degree planning and career awareness. Satisfactory-fail only.

Pol S 215. Introduction to American Government. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.Fundamentals of American democracy; constitutionalism; federalism; rights and duties of citizens; executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government; elections, public opinion, interest groups, and political parties.

Pol S 235. Introduction to Ethics and Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.SS.Prereq: Sophomore standing. Introduction to moral controversies surrounding political issues such as violence, deception, corruption, civil disobedience, democracy, justice, equality, and freedom. Students will read classic and contemporary texts and consider political applications. This course serves as an introduction to advanced courses in political theory.

Pol S 241. Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.Basic concepts and major theories; application to selected political systems, including non-western political systems.

Pol S 251. Introduction to International Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.Dynamics of interstate relations pertaining to nationalism, the nation state; peace and war; foreign policy making; the national interest; military capability and strategy; case studies of transnational issues, such as population, food, energy, and terrorism.

Pol S 298. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS.Prereq: Permission of department cooperative education coordinator; sophomore classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Pol S 301. Introduction to Empirical Political Science Research. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.Prereq: 3 credits in political science; one statistics course required; sophomore classification. Techniques of quantitative and qualitative political research and analysis. Development and analysis of concepts and theories. Methods of data collection, research design, and critical thinking. Applications of statistics to political research.

Pol S 302. Politics of Writing, Speaking, and Reading. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: English 250; 3 credits in Political Science. Political Science majors only. Focus on the connections between communicative and rhetorical skill and effective civic understanding and participation. Techniques of effective communication and persuasion in writing and speaking. Development of skills of critical and rhetorical analysis in reading.

Pol S 305. Political Behavior. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Sophomore classification. Empirical theories and descriptions of political behavior, including decision-making, opinion, and attitudes, with an emphasis on groups and political elites.

Pol S 310. State and Local Government. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 3 credits in political science. Role of state and local governments in the American federal system. Structures of participation: political parties, elections, interest groups. Major governmental institutions: legislative, executive, and judicial. Structure and functions of local governments.

Pol S 311. Municipal Government and Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: 215. Legal position of municipal corporation; forms of organization; administration of municipal services; problem-solving in municipal government; urban and metropolitan political process; implications of federal urban policies.

Pol S 312. Minicourse in American Government and Politics. (3-0) Cr. 2. F.S.Prereq: Sophomore classification. Half-semester courses on selected topical issues in American government and politics. Designated repeat in Pol S 312 is not permitted. Use of Pol S 312 credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information.

Pol S 313. Minicourse in Theory and Methods. (3-0) Cr. 2. F.S.Prereq: Sophomore classification. Half-semester course on selected topical issues in theory and methods in political science. Designated repeat in Pol S 313 is not permitted. Use of Pol S 313 credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information.

Pol S 314. Minicourse in Comparative Politics. (3-0) Cr. 2. F.S.Prereq: Sophomore classification. Half-semester course on selected topical issues in comparative politics. Designated repeat in Pol S 314 is not permitted. Use of Pol S 314 credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information.

Pol S 315. Minicourse in International Relations. (3-0) Cr. 2. F.S.Prereq: Sophomore classification. Half-semester course on selected topical issues in international relations. Designated repeat in Pol S 315 is not permitted. Use of Pol S 315 credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information.

Pol S 318. Campaign and Elections. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Methods and techniques of political campaigns in general elections. Supervised participation in candidate and political party campaign activities required.

Pol S 319. Law and Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: Sophomore standing; 215 recommended. An evaluation of the American judicial system as it relates to controversial topics emphasizing the relationship between law and politics. Primary emphasis on topics such as statutory construction, judicial review, the proper role of the judiciary, vagueness and ambiguity in law, competing constitutional philosophies, executive branch concerns, and relative power of different branches. Credit for both Pol S 319 and 230 may not be applied toward graduation.

Pol S 320. American Judicial Process. (Cross-listed with CJ St). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Pol S 215. An overview of the American judicial process. Emphasis on specific topics such as application of constitutional rights to the states (particularly the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments), mechanics of judicial opinions, constitutional philosophies of Supreme Court Justices, decisions of first impression, and the value and scope of precedent.

Pol S 334. Politics and Society. (Cross-listed with Soc). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: A course in political science or sociology. The relationship between politics and society with emphasis on American society. Discussion of theories of inequality, power, social movements, elites, ruling classes, democracy, and capitalism.

Pol S 335. Science, Technology, and Public Policy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Examines the history and political dynamics of public science and technology policies. Examines differences in political and technological orientations. Assessment of the roles of politics, media, engineering, science, and private business in the formation public policies that put heavy reliance on or seek to advance science and technology.

Pol S 340. Politics of Developing Areas. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Examination of economic and political development as they relate to the political process of developing states. Impact of social and technological change on political systems of developing areas. Some case studies.

Pol S 341. Politics of Asia. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Political institutions, processes, and contemporary issues. Selected countries examined intensively to illustrate generalizations. Topics such as foreign policy, role of parties, military, religious groups, human rights, women, environmental issues, interest groups, ideology, and globalization.

Pol S 343. Latin American Government and Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3.Political institutions, processes, and contemporary issues. Selected countries examined intensively to illustrate generalizations. Role of parties, military, church, human rights, women, environmental issues, interest groups, ideology, and globalization.

Pol S 344. Public Policy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.How agendas come to be set in public policy, theories describing the policy-making process, forces molding policy choices and the impact of such choices.

Pol S 346. European Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Comparative study of political institutions of Europe and the European Union; emphasis on parties, elections, and governmental structures. Substance and process of public policies in selected problem areas.

Pol S 347. African Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Major trends in African politics over the last 150 years and current issues facing Africans today. Basic African geography. Topics include democratization, economic development, civil conflict, ethnic politics and foreign aid.

Pol S 349. Politics of Russia and the Soviet Successor States. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Nation-states of the former Soviet Union. Analysis of Soviet Communist system 1917-85 and the politics and revolutionary conflict leading to the dissolution of the Soviet Union from 1985 through 1991. Problems of post-Soviet nation-states of Russia and Central Eurasia since 1991.

Pol S 350. Politics of the Middle East. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Introduction to the Middle East as a region and to issues of political importance to the Middle East and its place in the world. Topics covered include Islam, regional conflicts and alliances, local leaders, economic issues, and gender and social relations. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 356. Theories of International Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3.Introduction to essential theoretical concepts and approaches, both classical and contemporary on world politics including realism, empiricism, liberalism, and postpositivism; for example, war and conflict, peace and cooperation, political economy, crisis decision-making, systemic theory, dependence and interdependence.

Pol S 357. International Security Policy. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.The major theoretical approaches in security policy -- strategy and deterrence, game theory, bargaining theory, compellance, and coercive diplomacy, and crisis diplomacy. Illustration of these various approaches through historical and contemporary cases.

Pol S 358. United States Foreign Policy. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 215 or 251, or Hist 467 or 470 or 471. U.S. foreign policy since World War II with emphasis on changing American values in foreign policy, the role of the President, Congress, and the bureaucracy in policy making, and a survey of current foreign policy issues and problems.

Pol S 359. Current Issues in American Foreign Policy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 215, 251, or 358. Examination of contemporary U.S. foreign policy issues (e.g., U.S. policy in the Middle East; defense budgeting in the post-Cold War era; conventional and nuclear arms control policy). The course will explore alternate methods to analyze policy, survey the evolution of each issue, and discuss different policy alternatives.

Pol S 360. American Institutions: Congress. (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: 215. Theory and practice of representation and deliberation in the legislative branch of the republic; operations of Congress in terms of its committees, leadership, legislative and oversight processes, partisan politics, electoral campaigns, service to local and special electoral campaigns, service to local and special interests, and interactions with the President.

Pol S 361. American Institutions: The Presidency. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 215. Creation and historical development of the office of chief executive; character and behavior of past chief executives; selection and control; powers, roles, functions; executive staff; relations with Congress, press, public opinion.

Pol S 363. American Institutions: Media. (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: Sophomore standing. Course surveys the influence of mass media organizations, forms, techniques, and technologies on the practices and expectations of American politics. Evaluates the role of media in the political process, exploring the extents to which media promotes or discourages political participation. Topics will examine the influence and political uses of news coverage, political advertising, political debates, talk radio, film, the Internet, and media spectacles.

Pol S 370. Religion and Politics. (Cross-listed with Relig). (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: Relig 105 or 210 recommended. The interaction of religion and politics in the U.S. from both an historical and contemporary perspective, as well as the role of religion in politics internationally. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 371. Introduction to Public Administration. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Sophomore classification. A survey of the historic and contemporary administrative realities that contribute to the unique challenges of public governance at the administrative and managerial levels of international, national, state, and local government. This introductory course explores the essential issues and competencies involved in the efficient, effective, and ethical provision of public goods and services. Critical topics addressed in the course include crisis management, intergovernmental relations, social equity, public-private partnerships, and privatization.

Pol S 381. International Political Economy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Introduction to the theoretical perspectives on international political economy. Exploration of specific issues such as the changing international trade regime, international finance, and Third World development under conditions of globalization.

Pol S 385. Women in Politics. (Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Examination of the entry and participation of women in politics in the United States and other countries including a focus on contemporary issues and strategies for change through the political process.

Pol S 398. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS.Prereq: Permission of department cooperative education coordinator; junior classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing work period.

Pol S 406. Public Opinion and Voting Behavior. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 6 credits in political science or junior classification. The formation of political opinions and attitudes, political participation, and voting behavior of the general public, and their influences on American politics; polling as a means of assessing public opinions and behaviors. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 413. Intergovernmental Relations. (Dual-listed with 513). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 6 credits in American government. Theories and practices of the American federal system. Politics and policy making among federal, state, and local governments. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 417. Campaign Rhetoric. (Cross-listed with Sp Cm). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: Sp Cm 212. Backgrounds of candidates for state and national elections; selected speeches and issues; persuasive strategies and techniques of individual speakers. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 420. Constitutional Law. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 215; junior classification. Development of the United States Constitution through judicial action; influence of public law and judicial interpretations upon American government and society. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 421. Constitutional Freedoms. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 320 or 420. Leading Supreme Court cases interpreting the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment. Emphasis on religion, speech, privacy, due process, and equal protection. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 422. International Law. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 215 or 251; junior classification. Development of the principles of international law of peace and war; analysis of theories concerning its nature and fundamental conceptions; its relation to national law; problems of international legislation and codification. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 430. Foundations of Western Political Thought. (Cross-listed with Cl St). (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: 6 credits in political science, philosophy, or European history. Study of original texts in political thought ranging from the classical period to the renaissance. Topics such as justice, freedom, virtue, the allocation of political power, the meaning of democracy, human nature, and natural law. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 431. Early Modern Political Thought. (Dual-listed with 531). (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: 6 credits in political science, philosophy, or European history. Study of original texts in political thought ranging from the Reformation to the French Revolution and its aftermath. Topics such as justice, freedom, rights, democracy, toleration, property, power, skepticism, and normative views of international politics. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 433. American Political Thought. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 6 credits in political science or in American history. Review of major political concepts and theorists in American political history. Analysis of current concepts in U.S. political thought, and their possible impacts on our political institutions. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 442. The Policy and Politics of Coastal Areas. (Dual-listed with 542). (Cross-listed with Env S). (3-0) Cr. 3. SS.Exploration of political implications of coastal policy. Issues include: "Carrying capacity," zoning, regulation of human development activities, trade-offs between conservation and jobs, the quality of coastal lifestyle, ways in which citizens participate in policy for coastal areas.

Pol S 452. Comparative Foreign Policy. (Dual-listed with 552). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 251. Various theoretical approaches to explain foreign policy making and behavior through the use of case studies of selected nations. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 453. International Organizations. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 251. Private and public organizations such as the United Nations, other specialized agencies, and multinational organizations, and their influence on our daily lives. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 464. Political Parties and Interest Groups. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 215; junior classification. Interest groups and American political parties, their principles, organizations and activities.

Pol S 470. Public Choice. (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: Econ 101. Application of economics to political science in the study of nonmarket decision-making. Behavior of bureaucrats, elected officials, and voters. Market failure, collective action, representative democracies, direct democracies, logrolling, voter paradoxes, and game theory. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 475. Management in the Public Sector. (Dual-listed with 575). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 371. Literature and research on organizational behavior and management theory with emphasis on applied aspects of managing contemporary public sector organizations. Topics include distinctions between public and private organizations, leadership, productivity, employee motivation, organizational structure, and organizational change. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 476. Administrative Law. (Dual-listed with 576). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 215; junior classification. Constitutional problems of delegation of governmental powers, elements of fair administrative procedures, judicial control over administrative determinations. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 477. Government, Business, and Society. (Dual-listed with 577). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: Junior classification. Diverse perspectives on the changing roles and relationships of business, government and society so as to open the way for more effective policy decisions on corporate-government affairs. Topics may include the changing economy; transformation of workplace and community conditions; consumerism; social responsibilities of businesses; economic policies and regulations; and politics in the business-government relationship. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 480. Ethics and Public Affairs. (Dual-listed with 580). (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: 6 credits in political science. Study of decision making approaches and application to case studies. Topics such as the different roles of public officials, proper scope and use of administrative discretion, and the admissibility of religious, political, and philosophical commitments in governmental decision making. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 482. Environmental Politics and Policies. (Dual-listed with 582). (Cross-listed with Env S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 3 credits in political science or 3 credits in Environmental Studies; junior classification. Major ideologies relation to conservation and ecology. Processes, participants, and institutions involved in state, national, and global environmental policymaking. Case studies of environmental controversies and proposals for policy reform. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 483. Law and Management. (Dual-listed with 583). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2009.Emerging constitutional/legal doctrines and requirements in public management: concept of new property rights in public employment/public service delivery; procedural due process requirement; scope of free speech and liberty protected in the conduct of public management; equal employment opportunity requirements; and the scope of official and personal immunities and liability in public affairs.

Pol S 485. Comparative Public Administration. (Dual-listed with 585). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Comparisons of government bureaucratic in major world regions, trends and issues of administrative and management reforms, globalization and other contemporary challenges to state administrative structures and policies, skills needed to evaluate and implement public management reforms.

Pol S 487. Electronic Democracy. (2-1) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Sophomore standing or instructor approval. The impact of computers, the Internet, and the World Wide Web on politics and policy. The positive and negative effects on information technology (IT) on selected topics such as freedom, power and control, privacy, civic participation, the sense of "community," virtual cities," interest group behavior, the new media, campaigns, elections, and voting will be examined. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Pol S 490. Independent Study. Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.Prereq: 6 credits in political science. Special studies in the political institutions, processes and policies of American, foreign, and international governments. Also, studies in traditional and behavioral political theory. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. No more than 9 credits of Pol S 490 may be counted toward graduation.
A. American Government and Politics
B. Theory and Method
C. Comparative Politics
D. International Relations
E. Extended credit. The student may earn an additional 1 or 2 credits for extra study done for any 300- or 400-level course, with instructor's approval.
G. Catt Center Project
H. Honors

Pol S 491. Senior Thesis. Cr. 3.Prereq: 21 credits of Pol S and permission of instructor. Written under the supervision of a Political Science faculty advisor.

Pol S 495. Capstone Project in Political Science. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 21 credits in political science and permission of instructor. Capstone project for political science majors; integrating research, analysis and participation.

Pol S 498. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS.Prereq: Permission of department cooperative education coordinator; senior classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Pol S 499. Internship in Political Science. Cr. arr. F.S.SS.Prereq: 6 credits in political science; junior or senior classification; and permission of internship coordinator. Work experience with a specific nongovernmental or governmental agency at the local, state, national, or international level, combined with academic work under faculty supervision. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. Satisfactory-fail only.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

Pol S 501. Quantitative Methods for Public Managers. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Graduate classification. Use of data in managerial decison-making and policy analysis. Research design and sampling methods. Statistical software use required.

Pol S 502. Political Analysis and Research. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 6 credits in political science. Scope and methods of political science. Introduction to theoretical approaches and analytical reasoning in political science. Relationship of theory and data. Research design.

Pol S 504. Proseminar in International Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 6 credits in political science or graduate standing. An overview of the major theoretical and empirical works in the study of international politics and foreign policy. Among the major theoretical approaches surveyed and applied to international politics are realism, neo-realism, liberalism, functionalism, rational choice theory, game theory, and decision-making theory. Seminal writings by leading scholars will be reviewed.

Pol S 505. Proseminar in Comparative Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 6 credits in political science or graduate standing. Major theoretic approaches to the study of comparative politics -- varying concepts and definitions of society and policy, administrative traditions, institutional arrangements, political behavior, etc. Contrasting research method designs.

Pol S 506. Proseminar in American Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 6 credits in political science or graduate standing. A presentation of the major theories and research on American government and politics. Substantive topics include modern democratic theory, institutional performance, and mass political behavior. A variety of research methodologies are examined, including normative theory, behavioralism, and rational choice analysis.

Pol S 510. State Government and Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: 310. Comparative analysis of state political systems. Role of interest groups, political parties, legislatures, courts, and governors in state politics. Possible determinants of public policy outputs at the state level.

Pol S 513. Intergovernmental Relations. (Dual-listed with 413). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 6 credits of American government. Theories and practices of the American federal system. Politics and policy making among federal, state, and local governments.

Pol S 525. Mass Political Behavior. (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: 6 credits in Political Science or graduate standing.. An in-depth survey of the theoretical, empirical, and methodological works concerning mass political behavior in the United States. Substantive topics include political attitudes and ideologies, public opinion and voting behavior, and political psychology. Methods for studying mass behavior include survey research and experimental approaches.

Pol S 531. Early Modern Political Thought. (Dual-listed with 431). (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: 6 credits in political science, philosophy, or European history. Study of original texts in political thought ranging from the Reformation to the French Revolution and its aftermath. Topics such as justice, freedom, rights, democracy, toleration, property, power, skepticism, and normative views of international politics.

Pol S 534. Legal and Ethical Issues in Information Assurance. (Cross-listed with Cpr E, InfAs). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Graduate classification; Cpr E 531 or InfAs 531. Legal and ethical issues in computer security. State and local codes and regulations. Privacy issues.

Pol S 535. Contemporary Political Philosophy. (Cross-listed with Phil). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: 6 credits of philosophy or political science. Examination of theories of justice proposed by contemporary political philosophers. Analysis of the philosophical foundations of perspectives such as liberalism, libertarianism, communitarianism, socialism, feminism. Normative assessments of socio-political institutions.

Pol S 541. Strategic Public Management. (40-0) Cr. 3. S.Theory and practice of strategic planning and implementation in the public sector. Alignment of planning with other strategic systems. Discussion of fundamental strategic management issues and concepts. Introduction of alternatives to the bureaucratic paradigm. Includes group exercises and guidance for strategic management facilitation. Course is one-week intensive format.

Pol S 542. The Policy and Politics of Coastal Areas. (Dual-listed with 442). (3-0) Cr. 3. SS.Exploration of political implications of coastal policy. Issues include: "Carrying capacity," zoning, regulation of human development activities, tradeoffs between conservation and jobs, the quality of coastal lifestyle, ways in which citizens participate in policy for coastal areas.

Pol S 544. Comparative Public Policy. (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: 6 credits in political science. Examines how, why, and to what effect governments deal with substantive policy problems differently. Environmental factors, ideologies, cultures, domestic policy making processes, and interest groups.

Pol S 547. Political Leadership and Elites. (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: 6 credits in political science. Various forms of leadership and leader-follower relations. Obligations, exchanges, incentives, coercion, corruption, bossism in both the U.S. and foreign experience.

Pol S 552. Comparative Foreign Policy. (Dual-listed with 452). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 251. Various theoretical approaches to explain foreign policy making and behavior through the use of case studies of selected nations.

Pol S 559. International Relations Theory. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 6 credits in international studies. Selected theoretical writings, both classical and contemporary, on world politics. Realism, war and conflict, peace and cooperation, political economy, crisis decision making, and transnational relations.

Pol S 560. American Political Institutions. (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: 6 credits in American government. Examination of policy-making and governance in a separation of powers system. Interaction between the chief executive, the legislature, administrative agencies, and the public. How political and legal forces affect policy makers and are reflected in public policies and programs.

Pol S 569. Foundations of Public Administration. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Graduate classification. An examination of the social, political, intellectual, and environmental factors contributing to the historical development and central issues of American Public Administration. Exploration of classic and contemporary texts of public administration emphasizing constitutional and civic roles of public servants, administrative responsibility in democratic governance and justice, and essential frameworks to identify managerial skills, perspectives, and resources for effective, equitable public service.

Pol S 570. Politics and Management of Nonprofit Organizations. (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: Graduate classification. Discussion of contemporary issues and perspectives shaping the policy development and management of national and international nonprofit organizations. Topics include an historic overview of nonprofit and philanthropic perspectives; exploration of nonprofit organization roles in public service provision; review of the legal framework influencing nonprofit governance; and consideration of capacity building issues such as strategic planning, board development, fundraising, human resources, and volunteer management.

Pol S 571. Organizational Theory in the Public Sector. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Graduate classification. Major theories of administrative organization, including motivations of administrators and organizations, comparisons of organizational arrangements, factors affecting organizational arrangements, and formal and informal decision-making structures.

Pol S 572. Public Finance and Budgeting. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Graduate classification. Topics such as the fiscal role of government in a mixed economy; evaluation of sources of public revenue and credit; administrative, political, and institutional aspects of the budget and the budgetary process; alternative budget formats; skills required to analyze public revenue and spending. Spreadsheet use required.

Pol S 573. Public Personnel Administration. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Graduate classification. Course discusses the history and development of high performance personnel administration in the public and nonprofit sectors regarding strategic planning, employee rights and responsibilities, performance assessment, collective bargaining, and civil service systems. Emphasized basic competencies in the essential human resource management tools in the areas of recruitment, retention, employee development, compensation, discipline, and conflict resolution.

Pol S 574. Policy and Program Evaluation. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Graduate classification. Integration, application, and utilization of public administration and public policy concepts in the interpretation of results and effectiveness of public programs and the prediction of consequences for policymakers and administrators.

Pol S 575. Management in the Public Sector. (Dual-listed with 475). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 6 credits in political science. Literature and research on organizational behavior and management. Theory with emphasis on applied aspects of managing contemporary public sector organizations. Topics include distinctions between public and private organizations, leadership, productivity, employee motivation, organizational structure, and organizational change.

Pol S 576. Administrative Law. (Dual-listed with 476). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: Graduate classification. Constitutional problems of delegation of governmental powers, elements of fair administrative procedures, judicial control over administrative determinations.

Pol S 577. Government, Business, and Society. (Dual-listed with 477). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Graduate classification. Diverse perspectives on the changing roles and relationships of business, government and society so as to open the way for more effective policy decisions on corporate-government affairs. Topics may include the changing economy; transformation of workplace and community conditions; consumerism; social responsibilities of businesses; economic policies and regulations; and politics in the business-government relationship.

Pol S 579. Public Revenues and Cost Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Graduate classification. Provides an overview of public revenue policies and administration, and concepts and techniques of cost analysis. Examines topics such as administration and policies of property taxes, income taxes, sales taxes, and user charges. Provides an introductory understanding of different cost analysis techniques such as average cost and marginal cost analysis and activity-based costing. Spreadsheet use required.

Pol S 580. Ethics and Public Affairs. (Dual-listed with 480). (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: 6 credits in political science. Study of decision making approaches and application to case studies. Topics such as the different roles of public officials, proper scope and use of administrative discretion, and the admissibility of religious, political, and philosophical commitments in governmental decision making.

Pol S 581. International Political Economy. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 6 credits in political science. An overview of the international political economy since the end of World War II. Special emphasis on national (primarily U.S.) development assistance and agricultural/food politics and policies, and those of the international food organizations, the World Bank, and the regional development banks.

Pol S 582. Environmental Politics and Policies. (Dual-listed with 482). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 3 credits in political science or 3 credits in Environmental Studies; graduate classification. Major ideologies relating to conservation and ecology. Processes, participants, and institutions involved in state, national, and global environmental policymaking. Case studies of environmental controversies and proposals for policy reform.

Pol S 583. Law and Management. (Dual-listed with 483). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Emerging constitutional/legal doctrines and requirements in public management: concept of new property rights in public employment/public service delivery; procedural due process requirement; scope of free speech and liberty protected in the conduct of public management; equal employment opportunity requirements; and the scope of official and personal immunities and liability in public affairs.

Pol S 585. Comparative Public Administration. (Dual-listed with 485). (3-0) Cr. 3.Comparison of government bureaucratic in major world regions; trends and issues of administrative and management reforms; globalization and other contemporary challenges to state administrative structures and policies; skills needed to evaluate and implement public management reforms.

Pol S 590. Special Topics. Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor.
A. American Political Institutions
B. Public Law
C. Political Theory and Methodology
D. Comparative Government
E. International Relations
F. Political Parties and Policy Formation
G. Public Administration and Public Policy
I. Internship
T. Teaching Preparation

Pol S 598. Public Administration Internship. Cr. 3-6. F.S.Prereq: 15 credits in political science, permission of the instructor. Supervised internship with administrative agencies, legislative organizations, judicial branch offices, and nonprofit groups.

Pol S 599. Creative Component. Cr. arr.

Courses for graduate students

Pol S 610. Graduate Seminars. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S.Prereq: 15 credits in political science.
A. American Political Institutions
B. Public Law
C. Political Theory and Methodology
D. Comparative Government
E. International Relations
F. Policy Process
G. Public Administration and Public Policy

Pol S 699. Research. Cr. arr. Repeatable.