Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2009-2011 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

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Horticulture

100 |200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses |500 |600 |

www.hort.iastate.edu

Jeffery Iles, Chair of Department
University Professors: Christians, Nonnecke
Professors: Arora, Domoto, Gleason, Graves, Hannapel, Iles, Minner, Taber
Professors (Emeritus): Chaplin, Hall, Hodges
Professor (Collaborator): Yadav
Associate Professors: Delate, Fei, Gladon, Haynes, Stephens, VanDerZanden
Associate Professors (Collaborators): Beeson, Krebs
Assistant Professor: Reinert
Assistant Professors (Collaborators): Sharma, Widrlechner
Senior Lecturers: Osborn, Rollenhagen
Lecturer: Nilles

Undergraduate Study

For undergraduate curriculum in Horticulture leading to the Bachelor of Science degree, see Horticulture, Curriculum.

To meet the educational needs of a student population with interests ranging from landscape design/installation to fruit and vegetable production to golf course construction and management, considerable flexibility is built into the Horticulture curriculum. And the diversity of interests and need for flexibility is reflected in our impressive array of Horticulture courses.

The Department of Horticulture offers nine options within the Horticulture major; (1) Environmental Horticulture, (2) Greenhouse Production and Management, (3) Fruit & Vegetable Production and Management, (4) Horticultural Communications and Public Education, (5) Nursery Crops Production and Garden Center Management, (6) Landscape Design, Installation and Management, (7) Public Garden Management and Administration, (8) Science, and (9) Turfgrass Management. Students considering graduate degrees should participate in the Science option.

Graduates possess the technical knowledge and skills to become professional Horticulturists. They understand plant growth and development and are familiar with cultural and management principles for a wide assortment of Horticultural crops. They are able to work and communicate effectively with fellow Horticultural professionals and with ordinary citizens who share an interest in Horticulture. Graduates also understand the ethical and environmental dimensions of problems and issues facing Horticultural professionals.

A degree in Horticulture opens the door to employment opportunities with production nurseries, seed companies, interior landscaping firms, greenhouses, garden centers, conservatories, landscape design/installation firms, public gardens and arboreta, orchards and vineyards, food processing companies, vegetable farms, golf courses, sports fields, sod production companies and lawn care businesses. Several industries closely related to Horticulture provide employment opportunities in the areas of sales, management, and communication. Opportunities also exist for careers in research, teaching, and business after obtaining advanced training in graduate school.

Undergraduate students have the option of selecting a secondary major in one of several interdepartmental programs including, seed science, agricultural education, environmental studies, or international agriculture (see Index).

Minor

The Department of Horticulture offers work for a minor in Horticulture that is earned by taking Hort 221 plus 12 additional credits with a maximum of 3 credits at the 200-level and a minimum of 9 credits at the 300-level or above.

Visit our departmental website at www.hort.iastate.edu

Graduate Study

The graduate major in Horticulture leads to the M.S. (thesis required) and Ph.D. A nonthesis master's degree is offered through the master of agriculture program. Some faculty members of the department serve as major professors for students in interdepartmental graduate majors in plant biology; genetics; molecular, cellular, and developmental biology; ecology and evolutionary biology; sustainable agriculture; and environmental science.

Graduate students majoring in Horticulture usually take minor course work in Agronomy, botany (cytology, morphology, or physiology), biochemistry, chemistry, entomology, food science and human nutrition, genetics, plant pathology, or Statistics. There is no uniform foreign language requirement for the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Graduates possess a broad understanding of horticulture and the allied plant sciences. They are able to communicate effectively with members of the scientific community, industry groups, and other interested citizens. They are experienced in conducting research and communicating the results from that research. They are capable of addressing and solving complex problems that confront the many Horticultural, agricultural and plant science professions. They also understand the ethical, legal, social, and environmental issues associated with modern agricultural/horticultural practices.

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

Hort 110. Orientation in Horticulture. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.Introduction to the field of horticulture.

Hort 112. Orientation to Learning and Productive Team Membership. (Cross-listed with Aer E, FS HN, TSM, NREM). (2-0) Cr. 2. F.Introduction to developing intentional learners and worthy team members. Learning as the foundation of human enterprise; intellectual curiosity; ethics as a personal responsibility; everyday leadership; effective team and community interactions including team learning and the effects on individuals; and growth through understanding self, demonstrating ownership of own learning, and internalizing commitment to helping others. Intentional mental processing as a means of enhancing learning. Interconnectedness of the individual, the community, and the world.

Hort 114. Developing Responsible Learners and Effective Leaders. (Cross-listed with NREM, FS HN, TSM). (2-0) Cr. 2. S.Focus on team and community. Application of fundamentals of human learning; evidence of development as a responsible learner; intentional mental processing as a habit of mind; planning and facilitating learning opportunities for others; responsibility of the individual to the community and the world; leading from within; holding self and others accountable for growth and development as learners and leaders.

Hort 121. Home Horticulture. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S.Growing plants in and around the home including requirements for growing house plants; plant propagation; designing and maintaining flower, fruit, and vegetable gardens; lawn, tree, and shrub maintenance.

Hort 122. Hands-On Home Horticulture. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S.Demonstration and activities that illustrate principles of growing plants for the home garden. Topics include plant identification, propagation, selection, and management for indoor and outdoor gardens.

Hort 193. Topics in Horticulture. Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Off Campus. Offered as demand warrants. Includes practical courses in the field of horticulture. A maximum of 6 credits of Hort 193 may be used toward the total of 128 credits required for graduation.
A. Greenhouse Crops
B. Nursery Crops
C. Turfgrass
D. Fruit Crops
E. Vegetable Crops
F. Cross-Commodity
G. Landscape Horticulture

Hort 221. Principles of Horticulture. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: Biol 211. Biological principles of growing horticultural crops including anatomy, reproduction, light, temperature, water, nutrition, and growth and development. Laboratory exercises emphasize environmental factors and permit detailed observation of plant growth.

Hort 233. Foliage Plants for Interiorscapes. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 221. Identification, nomenclature, selection and culture of foliage plants for interior landscapes. Planning, cost-estimating, installation, and maintenance of foliage plants and flowering potted plants in homes, offices, and public buildings.

Hort 240. Trees, Shrubs, and Woody Vines for Landscaping. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Students will learn to identify trees, shrubs, and woody vines. Factors influencing the horticultural use of woody plants also will be taught.

Hort 280. Landscape Graphics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Introduction to computer and hand rendering techniques of landscape graphics. Students will gain proficiency in plan view, section and elevation graphics. Intensive studio and computer based instruction.

Hort 282. Educating Youth Through Horticulture. (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Planning, developing, and implementing science-based educational programs in a public garden setting. Through hands-on experiences students will learn about horticulture, learning theory, and the application of science principles as they pertain to educating youth.

Hort 283. Pesticide Application Certification. (Cross-listed with Ent, For, Agron). (2-0) Cr. 2. S.Holscher. Core background and specialty topics in agricultural, and horticultural pesticide applicator certification. Students can select certification categories and have the opportunity to obtain pesticide applicator certification at the completion of the course. Commercial pesticide applicator certification is emphasized.

Hort 321. Horticulture Physiology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 221 or Biol 211. Principles of plant physiology relating to growth and development of horticultural plants including plant water relations, membrane transport, photosynthesis, photomorphogenesis, respiration, and phytohormones. Emphasis on plant's responses to environmental factors (temperature, water, and light) including cellular and whole-plant physiology under stressful environments.

Hort 322. Plant Propagation. (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 221 or Biol 212. Fundamental principles underlying sexual and asexual propagation of plants; practice in reproducing plants by use of seeds, leaves, stems, and roots.

Hort 330. Herbaceous Ornamental Plants. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 221 or by permission of instructor. Identification, botanical characteristics, origins, propagation, uses and general culture of herbaceous annual and perennial plants for Midwestern gardens and landscapes.

Hort 332. Greenhouse Operation and Management. (3-3) Cr. 4. S.Prereq: 221. Principles of greenhouse and other controlled environment operation and management. Methods of monitoring and manipulating environmental factors such as light, temperature, fertility, production media, etc., to maximize production rate and quality and minimize production costs and time. Field trip(s) outside scheduled class time required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 338. Seed Science and Technology. (Cross-listed with Agron). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Agron 114 or Hort 221, Biol 211. Goggi. Seed production, maturation, dormancy, vigor, deterioration, and related aspects of enhancement, conditioning, storage, and quality evaluation. Aspects of the seed industry and regulation of seed marketing.

Hort 341. Woody Plant Cultivars: Shade Trees. (1-0) Cr. 1. S.Prereq: 240 or L A 221 or L A 222. Students will learn how to identify and care for the most horticulturally important shade tree taxa suitable for the Midwest. Cultivars of the most prevalent species also will be taught.

Hort 342. Landscape Installation and Establishment. (2-3) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 240 or L A 221 or L A 222. Principles and practices involved with establishment of managed landscapes. Laboratory work involves site evaluation, installation techniques, postplant care, and maintenance of established landscape plants.

Hort 351. Turfgrass Establishment and Management. (Cross-listed with Agron). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 221 or Agron 114 or Biol 211. Principles and practices of turfgrass propagation, establishment, and management. Specialized practices relative to professional lawn care, golf courses, athletic fields, highway roadsides, and seed and sod production. The biology and control of turfgrass pests. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 351L. Turfgrass Establishment and Management Laboratory. (Cross-listed with Agron). (0-3) Cr. 1. F.Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 351. Those enrolled in the horticulture curriculum are required to take 351L in conjunction with 351 except by permission of the instructor. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 354. Soils and Plant Growth. (Cross-listed with Agron). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: Biol 101 or 211. Killorn or Loynachan. Effects of chemical, physical, and biological properties of soils on plant growth, with emphasis on nutritive elements, pH, organic matter maintenance, and rooting development. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 354L. Soils and Plant Growth Laboratory. (Cross-listed with Agron). (0-3) Cr. 1. F.S.Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 354. Henning. Laboratory exercises in soil testing that assess a soil's ability to support nutritive requirements for plant growth.

Hort 380. Principles of Garden Composition. (2-0) Cr. 2. S.Prereq: 240. Not available as credit for L A majors. Functional and aesthetic aspects of landscape planning as a basis for design decisions; emphasis on plant selection. Includes site analysis, development process, and design principles.

Hort 381. Beginning Garden Composition Studio. (0-4) Cr. 2. S.Prereq: 240, 330. To be taken concurrently with 380. Not available as credit for L A majors. Development of landscape graphic techniques. Studio-based projects implementing principles of landscape design.

Hort 391. Horticultural Management Experience. Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: 221, permission of instructor. A structured work experience for the student to gain insight into management operations associated with production and management of horticultural crops. A report of 10 or more pages describing the student's experience is required. One credit is given for each term the student is enrolled in the course. A maximum of two credits may be used toward the horticultural sciences course requirements, and two additional credits may be used toward the 128 credits required for graduation.

Hort 398. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Permission of department resource and career center coordinator. Students must register for this course before commencing each work period.

Hort 421. Introduction to Plant Breeding. (Cross-listed with Agron). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Gen 320 or Biol 313. Breeding methods used in the genetic improvement of self-pollinated, cross-pollinated, and asexually reproduced agronomic and horticultural crops. Applications of biotechnology techniques in the development of improved cultivars. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 422. Postharvest Technology. (3-3) Cr. 4. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: 221, junior or senior classification. Principles, methods, and techniques related to postharvest maintenance of quality of horticultural commodities. Emphasis on the effects of handling, storage facilities and techniques, and quality evaluation. Field trips outside scheduled class time required. Weekend/overnight field trips may be required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 423. Plant Tissue, Cell, and Protoplast Culture. (Dual-listed with 523). (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: Biol 313 and Hort 321 or Biol 330. Theory and techniques of plant tissue culture, including organogenesis, somatic embryogenesis, micropropagation, anther and embryo culture, protoplast isolation and culture, and transformation. Applications to agriculture.

Hort 424. Sustainable and Environmental Horticulture Systems. (Dual-listed with 524). (Cross-listed with Env S). (2-0) Cr. 2. F.Inquiry into ethical issues and environmental consequences of horticultural cropping systems and production practices. Emphasis on production systems that are resource efficient, environmentally sound, socially acceptable, and profitable.

Hort 434. Greenhouse Crop Production I. (3-3) Cr. 4. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: 330 and 332. Principles and practices of greenhouse floricultural crop production. Emphasis is placed on production of common bulbous, cut flower, foliage, and containerized flowering species produced in greenhouses and other controlled environments. Field trips outside scheduled class time required. Weekend/overnight field trips may be required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 435. Greenhouse Crop Production II. (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 330 and 332. Principles and practices of greenhouse floricultural crop production. Emphasis is placed on production of flowering annual and perennial crops, vegetative annuals, and species in hanging baskets. Field trips outside scheduled class time required. Weekend/overnight field trips may be required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 442. Nursery Production and Management. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: 221. Theory, nursery layout and design, and cultural practices important for growing and shipping field and container-grown nursery crops. Overview of garden center design and retailing and marketing strategies. Field trip(s) outside scheduled class time may be required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 444. Landscape Construction. (2-3) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 240, junior or senior classification. Principles and practices of residential landscape construction. Encompasses process from initial client contact, materials procurement, job sequencing, and installation of plant material and hardscapes. Laboratory work involves site evaluation and measurement and landscape installation using various landscape materials and techniques.

Hort 445. Horticulture Management and Administration. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.Prereq: 221, junior or senior classification. In-depth presentation and discussion of skills and strategies needed to manage a horticultural enterprise. Topics include motivating employees, managing meetings, conducting performance appraisals, dealing with conflict, and managing an increasingly diverse work force.

Hort 446. Landscape Contracting and Estimating. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.Prereq: 240 and credit or enrollment in 342; junior or senior classification. Overview and implementation of landscape estimating and contracting. Includes estimating procedures (material, labor, equipment) and landscape business issues (contracts, insurance, personnel).

Hort 451. Professional Turfgrass Management. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: 351. Turfgrass science including the study of (1) specific information on soil chemistry and soil modification as they relate to the development and maintenance of turfgrass areas, (2) specialized management practices used in athletic field care, professional lawn care, and golf course industries, and (3) construction methods for golf courses and sports fields. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 452. Integrated Management of Diseases and Insect Pests of Turfgrasses. (Dual-listed with 552). (Cross-listed with Pl P, Ent). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: Hort 351. Gleason, D. Lewis. Identification and biology of important diseases and insect pests of turfgrasses. Development of integrated pest management programs in various turfgrass environments.

Hort 453. Sports Turf Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: 351. Management techniques for today's specialized athletic fields. The horticultural and budgetary aspects of football, soccer, baseball, and softball fields will be presented. Field trips and laboratory exercises will develop a practical understanding of actual principles in field development, construction, and management. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 454. Turf & Landscape Irrigation. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2009.Irrigation systems and principles for turf and landscape environments. Topics include design, installation, equipment, management, and trouble shooting of irrigation systems for golf, athletic fields, residential lawns and landscapes. Participation in practical exercises and local field trips to irrigation sites are required.

Hort 461. Fruit and Nut Crop Production and Management. (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: 221. Principles and practices of small fruit, tree fruit, and nut culture and production. Morphology, physiology of growth and development, plant establishment, pest management, pruning, training, harvesting, storage, and marketing. Emphasis on sustainable practices. Participation in practical exercises and local field trips is required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 471. Vegetable Production and Management. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 221 or Agron 114 and Agron 154 or 155. Principles of vegetable production with emphasis on sustainable practices, market outlets, business aspects, and risk management. Organic techniques will be discussed. Major crop climatic conditions, physiological growth and development, harvesting, storage, and marketing. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 471L. Vegetable Production and Management Laboratory. (0-2) Cr. 1. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: Credit or enrollment in Hort 471 is required, except by permission of the instructor. Sequence planting techniques, seed and seedling identification, seed germination quality and requirements, earliness techniques, irrigation management, fertilizer and compost application, postharvest handling, high tunnel production, and pesticide application will be covered. Field trip required. Some laboratory projects will require time outside the regular scheduled class period. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 475. Urban Forestry. (Cross-listed with For). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Junior or senior classification, 3 credits in biology. Discussion of establishment and management of woody perennials in community-owned urban greenspaces, consideration of urban site and soil characteristics, plant physiology, plant culture, urban forest valuation, inventory methods, species selection, and urban forest maintenance (health care and pest management). Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 480. Contemporary Issues in the Green Industry. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: junior or senior classification. Analysis and evaluation of contemporary issues facing the green industry including environmental regulations, labor, market share, landscape contracting business management and professionalism. Discussion format and interaction with green industry professionals.

Hort 481. Advanced Garden Composition. (0-5) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 240, 330, 380, 381. Limited to Planting Design/Installation option students. Development of residential landscapes using design principles and the design process. Projects encompass site analysis, concept development, preliminary design, final design, and graphic presentation techniques. Techniques will include hand and computer rendering.

Hort 484. Organic Agricultural Theory and Practice. (Dual-listed with 584). (Cross-listed with Agron). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 9 cr in biological or physical sciences. Delate & DeWitt. Understanding of the historical origins and ecological theories underpinning the practices involved in organic agriculture. Interdisciplinary examination of crop and livestock production and socio-economic processes and policies in organic agriculture from researcher and producer perspectives.

Hort 490. Independent Study. Cr. arr. Repeatable.Prereq: Junior or Senior classification in horticulture, permission of instructor. Investigation of topic holding special interest to the student. Comprehensive report required. Election of course and topic must be approved by department head. A maximum of 4 credits of Hort 490 and an additional 2 credits of 490 from outside Horticulture may be used toward the total of 128 credits required for graduation.
A. Greenhouse Crops
B. Nursery Crops
C. Turfgrass
D. Fruit Crops
E. Vegetable Crops
F. Cross-Commodity
G. Landscape Horticulture
H. Honors
I. International Study
J. Entrepreneurship Z. Service Learning

Hort 491. Seed Science Internship Experience. (Cross-listed with Agron, TSM). Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Agron 338, advanced approval and participation of employer and instructor. A professional work experience and creative project for seed science secondary majors. The project requires prior approval and participation of the employer and instructor. The student must submit a written report.

Hort 493. Workshop in Horticulture. Cr. arr. Repeatable.Off campus. Offered as demand warrants. Workshops in horticulture. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Hort 495. Horticulture Travel Course Preparation. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Permission of instructor. Limited enrollment. Students enrolled in this course also intend to register for Hort 496 the following term. Topics include preparation for safe international travel, the horticultural/agricultural industries, climate, crops, economics, geography, history, marketing, soils, culture, traditions, and horticultural/agricultural development of the country to be visited. Students enroll in this course the term immediately before travel to the foreign country.

Hort 496. Horticulture Travel Course. Cr. 1-4. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Permission of instructor. Limited enrollment. Study and tour of production methods in major horticultural regions of the world. Influence of climate, economics, geography, soils, landscapes, markets, cultures, and history of horticultural crops. Location and duration of tours will vary. Tour expenses paid by students.

Hort 497. Professional Development Seminar. (1-0) Cr. 1. S.Prereq: Junior or senior classification. Weekly series of lectures and workshops will help students better prepare for their professional career in horticulture by developing the professional skills necessary to be successful in today's competitive workplace.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

Hort 511. Integrated Management of Tropical Crops. (Cross-listed with Pl P, Ent). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: Pl P 408 or 416 or Ent 370 or 376 or Hort 221. Gleason, Lewis, Nonnecke. Applications of Integrated Crop Management principles (including plant pathology, entomology, and horticulture) to tropical cropping systems. Familiarization with a variety of tropical agroecosystems and Costa Rican culture is followed by 10-day tour of Costa Rican agriculture during spring break, then writeup of individual projects. Tour expenses paid by students.

Hort 523. Plant Tissue, Cell, and Protoplast Culture. (Dual-listed with 423). (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: Biol 313 and Hort 321 or Biol 330. Theory and techniques of plant tissue culture, including organogenesis, somatic embryogenesis, micropropagation, anther and embryo culture, protoplast isolation and culture, and transformation. Applications to agriculture.

Hort 524. Sustainable and Environmental Horticulture Systems. (Dual-listed with 424). (2-0) Cr. 2. F.Inquiry into ethical issues and environmental consequences of horticultural cropping systems and production practices. Emphasis on production systems that are resource efficient, environmentally sound, socially acceptable, and profitable.

Hort 529. Publishing in Biological Sciences Journals. (Cross-listed with Agron, NREM). (2-0) Cr. 2. S.Prereq: Permission of instructor; evidence of a publishable unit of the student's research data. Process of preparing a manuscript for submission to a refereed journal in the biological sciences. Emphasis on publishing self-generated data from thesis or dissertation research.

Hort 530. Research Orientation. (1-3) Cr. 2. F.Instruction in scientific methods and communication skills.

Hort 537. Plant Stress Biology. (Cross-listed with Agron, EEOB). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: Biol 330A or equivalent and BBMB 404-405. Physiology and molecular biology of plant responses to environmental stress. Emphasis on the role of hormones and hormone interactions in governing stress responses. Lectures are prepared from journal papers that elucidate key mechanisms controlling responses to drought, flooding, salt, nutrient deficiencies, freezing, pathogens and herbivores. Plants studied include genetic model systems and crops of horticultural and agronomic value.

Hort 542. Introduction to Molecular Biology Techniques. (Cross-listed with B M S, BBMB, BCB, EEOB, FS HN, GDCB, NREM, NutrS, V MPM, VDPAM). Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Graduate classification. Workshops in basic molecular biology techniques and related procedures. Satisfactory-fail only.
A. DNA Techniques. Includes genetic engineering procedures, sequencing, PCR, and genotyping. (F.S.SS.)
B. Protein Techniques. Includes fermentation, protein isolation, protein purification, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, NMR, confocal microscopy and laser microdissection, immunophenotyping, and monoclonol antibody production. (S.SS.)
C. Cell Techniques. Includes immunophenotyping, ELISA, flow cytometry, microscopic techniques, and image analysis. (F.S.)
D. Plant Transformation. Includes Agrobacterium and particle gun-mediated transformation of tobacco, Arabidopsis, and maize, and analysis of transformants. (S.)
E. Proteomics. Includes two-dimensional electrophoresis, laser scanning, mass spectrometry, and database searching. (F.)

Hort 543. Seed Physiology. (Cross-listed with STB). (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: Admission to the Seed Technology and Business Master's Degree Program or approval of the instructor. Brief introduction to plant physiology. Physiological aspects of seed development, maturation, longevity, dormancy and germination. Links between physiology and seed quality.

Hort 546. Organizational Strategies for Diversified Farming Systems. (Cross-listed with Agron, SusAg). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: SusAg 509. Examination of the organization and operation of complex, diversified farming systems using tools and perspectives drawn from ecology, agronomy, and sociology. The course contains a significant field component focused on an Iowa farm.

Hort 551. Growth and Development of Perennial Grasses. (Cross-listed with Agron). (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: Junior or senior or graduate classification or permission of instructor. The grass plant. Selected topics on anatomy, morphology, and physiology relative to growth and development of perennial grasses. Emphasis on growth and development characteristics peculiar to grasses and variations of such characteristics under natural and managed conditions.

Hort 552. Integrated Management of Diseases and Insect Pests of Turfgrasses. (Dual-listed with 452). (Cross-listed with Ent, Pl P). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: Hort 351. Gleason, D. Lewis. Identification and biology of important diseases and insect pests of turfgrasses. Development of integrated pest management programs in various turfgrass environments.

Hort 565. Professional Practice in the Life Sciences. (Cross-listed with Pl P, An S, V MPM, Agron, BCB, Micro). Cr. arr. S.Prereq: Graduate classification. Professional discourse on the ethical and legal issues facing life science researchers. Offered in modular format; each module is four weeks.
A. Professional Practices in Research. (Cr. 1.0) Good scientific practices and professional ethics in the life sciences.
B. Intellectual Property and Industry Interactions. (Cr. 0.5) Ethical and legal issues facing life scientists involved in research interactions with industry.

Hort 584. Organic Agricultural Theory and Practice. (Dual-listed with 484). (Cross-listed with Agron, SusAg). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 9 cr in biological or physical sciences. Delate & DeWitt. Understanding of the historical origins and ecological theories underpinning the practices involved in organic agriculture. Interdisciplinary examination of crop and livestock production and socio-economic processes and policies in organic agriculture from researcher and producer perspectives.

Hort 590. Special Topics. Cr. arr. Repeatable.Prereq: a major or minor in horticulture.

Hort 593. Workshop in Horticulture. Cr. arr. Repeatable.Workshops in horticulture, with emphasis on off-campus instruction.
A. Greenhouse Crops
B. Nursery Crops
C. Turfgrass
D. Fruit Crops
E. Vegetable Crops
F. Cross-Commodity
G. Landscape Horticulture

Hort 599. Creative Component. Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Courses for graduate students

Hort 610. Graduate Seminar. Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.Satisfactory-fail only.

Hort 690. Advanced Topics. Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Hort 696. Research Seminar. (Cross-listed with GDCB, Agron, BBMB, PlBio, For). Cr. 1. Repeatable.Research seminars by faculty and graduate students. Satisfactory-fail only.

Hort 698. Horticulture Teaching Practicum. (1-0) Cr. 1. S.Prereq: Graduate student classification. Discussions are intended to foster the development of graduate students as teaching assistants and future horticulture/plant science teachers. Topics include establishing a classroom presence, improving lectures, motivating students, dealing with difficult or disruptive students, and developing a teaching philosophy. Satisfactory-fail only.

Hort 699. Thesis and Dissertation Research. Cr. arr. Repeatable.
A. Greenhouse Crops
B. Nursery Crops
C. Turfgrass
D. Fruit Crops
E. Vegetable Crops
F. Cross-Commodity
G. Landscape Horticulture
I. Biotechnology