Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2009-2011 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

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Geology

100 |200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses |500 |600 |

See Geological and Atmospheric Sciences

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

Geol 100. The Earth. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.How does the earth work, what is it made of, and how does it change through time? Plate tectonics, Earth materials, landforms, structures, climate, and natural resources. Emphasis on the observations and hypotheses used to interpret earth system processes. Students may also enroll in Geol 100L.

Geol 100L. The Earth: Laboratory. (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 100. Characterization of rocks and minerals; interpretation of structures and landforms.

Geol 101. Environmental Geology: Earth in Crisis. (Cross-listed with Env S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.An introduction to geologic processes and the consequences of human activity from local to global scales. Discussion of human population growth, resource depletion, pollution and waste disposal, global warming and ozone depletion, desertification, and geologic hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, flooding, and volcanism.

Geol 102. History of the Earth. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 100 or 201. The Earth's physical and biological evolution; concepts of global tectonics. Methods used to decipher earth history. Students majoring in geology must also enroll in Geol 102L.

Geol 102L. History of the Earth: Laboratory. (0-2) Cr. 1. S.Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 102. Introduction to the use of sedimentary rocks and fossils in reconstructing the Earth's history.

Geol 108. Introduction to Oceanography. (Cross-listed with Env S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Introduction to study of the oceans. Ocean exploration. Waves and currents. Shape, structure, and origin of the ocean basins. Sedimentary record of oceanic life. Composition of seawater and its significance for life. Ocean circulation and its influence on climate. Life of the oceans, including coral reefs. Use and misuse of ocean resources. Anthropogenic impacts on the oceanic environment.

Geol 160. Water Resources of the World. (Cross-listed with Mteor, Env S, Agron). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Study of the occurrence, history, development, and management of world water resources. Basic hydrologic principles including climate, surface water, groundwater, and water quality. Historical and current perspectives on water policy, use, and the role of water in society and the environment.

Geol 201. Geology for Engineers and Environmental Scientists. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Introduction to Earth materials and processes with emphasis on engineering and environmental applications.

Geol 290. Independent Study. Cr. 2-4. Repeatable.Prereq: Permission of instructor.

Geol 298. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS.Prereq: 100 or 201, 100L, 102, 102L, and permission of the department cooperative education coordinator; sophomore classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing the work period.

Geol 302. Summer Field Studies. Cr. 6. SS.Prereq: 102, 356, 368. Geologic mapping; structural, stratigraphic, sedimentologic, and geomorphic analyses. Study areas include world-class dinosaur localities. A 6-week summer field course required of all geology majors. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 306. Geology Field Trip. Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. F.S.Prereq: 100 or 201, permission of instructor. Geology of selected regions studied by correlated readings followed by a field trip to points of geologic interest. Ten-day field trip required.

Geol 311. Mineralogy and Earth Materials. (3-6) Cr. 5. F.Prereq: 100 or 201, Chem 163. Introduction to mineral classification, elementary crystal chemistry, crystal morphology, mineral stability, and associations. Laboratory problems in mineral identification methods, including hand-specimen identification, optical microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 324. Energy and the Environment. (Cross-listed with Env S, Mteor). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Renewable and non-renewable energy resources. Origin, occurrence, and extraction of fossil fuels. Nuclear, wind, and solar energy. Energy efficiency. Environmental effects of energy production and use, including air pollution, acid precipitation, groundwater contamination, nuclear waste disposal, and global climate change. Geol 324 does not count toward credits required in the Geology major.

Geol 356. Structural Geology. (3-6) Cr. 5. S.Prereq: 100 or 201; Phys 111, Math 165 or 181. Principles of stress and strain. Brittle and ductile behavior of rocks. Description and classification of joints, faults, folds, fractures, foliation, and lineation. Plate tectonics and regional geology. Laboratory includes application of geometrical techniques to solve structural problems; emphasizes map interpretation and use of stereonet and computer methods. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 365. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology. (2-3) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 311. Nature and origin of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Emphasis on important rock-forming environments and processes and their influence on rock characteristics. Laboratory includes thin section study of rock textures and mineralogy and the interpretation of these features. Field trips. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 368. Stratigraphy and Sedimentation. (3-2) Cr. 4. F.Prereq: 311. Origin of sedimentary rocks and the characteristics of major depositional systems, geologic time, stratigraphic nomenclature, methods of correlation, facies and facies analysis, sequence stratigraphy, sedimentary tectonics and basin analysis. Required field and laboratory-based problem with a comprehensive written report. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 398. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS.Prereq: 100 or 201, 100L, 102, 102L, and permission of the department cooperative education coordinator; junior classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Geol 402. Watershed Hydrology. (Dual-listed with 502). (Cross-listed with Agron, EnSci, Mteor, NREM). (3-3) Cr. 4. F.Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering; junior standing. Examination of watersheds as systems, emphasizing the surface components of the hydrologic cycle. Combines qualitative understanding of hydrological processes and uncertainty with quantitative representation. Laboratory emphasizes field investigation and measurement of watershed processes. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 409. Field Methods in Hydrogeology. (Dual-listed with 509). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (0-4) Cr. 2. Alt. SS., offered 2010.Prereq: 402 or 411 or C E 473. Introduction to field methods used in groundwater investigations. In-field implementation of pumping tests, slug tests, monitoring well installation and drilling techniques, geochemical and water quality sampling, seepage meters, minipiezometers, stream gaging, electronic instrumentation for data collection, and geophysics. Field trips to investigate water resource, water quality, and remediation projects.

Geol 411. Hydrogeology. (Dual-listed with 511). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-2) Cr. 4. F.Prereq: Geol 100 or 201; Math 165 or 181; Phys 111 or 221. Physical principles of groundwater flow, nature and origin of aquifers and confining units, well hydraulics, groundwater modeling, and contaminant transport. Lab emphasizes applied field and laboratory methods for hydrogeological investigations. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 414. Applied Groundwater Flow Modeling. (Dual-listed with 514). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 411 or C E 473; Math 165 or 181. Introduction to the principles of modeling groundwater flow systems. Finite-difference and analytic-element methods, spreadsheet models, boundary conditions, calibration, sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, particle tracking, and post-audit analysis. Application of MODFLOW to regional flow-system analysis. Computer laboratory emphasizes assigned problems that illustrate topics discussed in the course. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 415. Paleoclimatology. (Dual-listed with 515). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: Four courses in biological or physical science. Introduction to mechanisms that drive climate, including the interplay between oceanic and atmospheric circulation and fluctuation in Earth's orbital parameters. Examination and analysis of past climate records ranging from historical documentation to ecological and geochemical proxies (e.g. tree ring analysis; O and C isotopes of skeletal carbonates and soils). Dating methods used to constrain and correlate climatic periods; utility of computer models to reconstruct past climates and predict future climate change. Emphasis placed on paleoclimatology and paleoecology of the late Quaternary (last ~1 million years). Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 419. Environmental Geochemistry. (Dual-listed with 519). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 402 or 411 or equivalent. Geochemistry of natural waters and water-rock interactions. Acid-base equilibria, carbonate chemistry and buffer systems, mineral dissolution and precipitation, sorption, ion exchange, and redox reactions. Introduction to thermodynamics and kinetics. Laboratory emphasizes chemical analysis of waters and computer modeling. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 426. Stable Isotopes in the Environment. (Dual-listed with 526). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: Four courses in biological or physical science. Introduction to the theory, methods and applications of stable isotopes. Primary focus on the origin, natural abundance, and fractionation of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen isotopes. Applications of isotopic occurrence for elucidation of physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. Effects of plant physiology, photosynthesis, trophic structure, diffusion, evaporation, chemical precipitation, soil and atmospheric processes, and environmental factors on isotope abundance. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 434. Contaminant Hydrogeology. (Dual-listed with 534). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Geol 411 or equivalent. Theory and practical considerations of fate and transport of solutes through porous geologic materials. Organic and inorganic contaminants in industrial and agricultural settings. Subsurface microbiology and biodegradation of aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Investigation of coupled processes (diffusion, advection, dispersion, sorption, and biodegradation) using computer models. Soil and groundwater monitoring and remediation strategies. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 451. Applied and Environmental Geophysics. (Dual-listed with 551). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 100 or 201, Math 181 or equivalent experience. Seismic, gravity, magnetic, resistivity, electromagnetic, and ground-penetrating radar techniques for shallow subsurface investigations and imaging. Data interpretation methods. Lab emphasizes computer interpretation packages. Field work with seismic - and resistivity-imaging systems and radar. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 452. GIS for Geoscientists. (Dual-listed with 552). (Cross-listed with Agron, EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 100, 201 or equivalent. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with particular emphasis on geoscientific data. Uses ESRI's ArcGIS Desktop Software and extension modules. Emphasizes typical GIS operations and analyses in the geosciences to prepare students for advanced GIS courses. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 457. Exploration Seismology. (Dual-listed with 557). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: 100 or 201, Math 181 or equivalent experience. Physics of elastic-wave propagation. Seismic surveys in environmental imaging, engineering, and petroleum exploration. Reflection and refraction techniques. Data collection, processing, and geological interpretation. Field work with state-of-the-art equipment. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 474. Glacial and Quaternary Geology. (Dual-listed with 574). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: 100 or 201 or equivalent experience. The study of the depositional and erosional processes of glaciers using modern glacier analogs and landforms. Discussion of glaciology, glacier hydrology, Quaternary history and stratigraphy, paleoclimatology, and causes of glaciation. Laboratory emphasizes aerial photo and topographic map interpretation and the Quaternary stratigraphy of Iowa. Two required field trips. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 479. Surficial Processes. (Dual-listed with 579). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 100 or 201 or equivalent experience. Study of surficial processes in modern and ancient geological environments. Topics include weathering, sediment transport, and landform genesis with emphasis on fluvial, glacial, hillslope, eolian, and coastal processes. Applications to engineering and environmental problems. Laboratory emphasizes aerial photo and topographic map interpretation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 490. Independent Study. Cr. 1-4. Repeatable.Prereq: 6 credits in geology and permission of instructor. No more than 9 credits of Geol 490 may be counted toward graduation.

Geol 495. Undergraduate Seminar. Cr. 1. F.S.Prereq: Junior or senior classification. Weekly seminar on topics of current research interest.

Geol 498. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS.Prereq: Geol 100 or 201, 100L, 102, 102L, and permission of the department cooperative education coordinator; senior classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

Geol 502. Watershed Hydrology. (Dual-listed with 402). (Cross-listed with EnSci, Mteor). (3-3) Cr. 4. F.Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering; junior standing. Examination of watersheds as systems, emphasizing the surface components of the hydrologic cycle. Combines qualitative understanding of hydrological processes and uncertainty with quantitative representation. Laboratory emphasizes field investigation and measurement of watershed processes.

Geol 506. Geology Field Trip. Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. F.S.Prereq: Graduate classification. Geology of selected regions studied by correlated readings, followed by a field trip to points of geologic interest. Ten-day field trip.

Geol 507. Midwestern Geology Field Trip. Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.Prereq: Geol 365. On-site inspection of various ore deposits, mining operations, and terrains dominated by igneous or metamorphic rocks. Satisfactory-fail only.

Geol 509. Field Methods in Hydrogeology. (Dual-listed with 409). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (0-4) Cr. 2. Alt. SS., offered 2010.Prereq: 402 or 411 or C E 473. Introduction to field methods used in groundwater investigations. In-field implementation of pumping tests, slug tests, monitoring well installation and drilling techniques, geochemical and water quality sampling, seepage meters, minipiezometers, stream gaging, electronic instrumentation for data collection, and geophysics. Field trips to investigate water resource, water quality, and remediation projects.

Geol 511. Hydrogeology. (Dual-listed with 411). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-2) Cr. 4. F.Prereq: Geol 100 or 201; Math 165 or 181; Phys 111 or 221. Physical principles of groundwater flow, nature and origin of aquifers and confining units, well hydraulics, groundwater modeling, and contaminant transport. Lab emphasizes applied field and laboratory methods for hydrogeological investigations.

Geol 514. Applied Groundwater Flow Modeling. (Dual-listed with 414). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 411 or C E 473; Math 165 or 181. Introduction to the principles of modeling groundwater flow systems. Finite-difference and analytic-element methods, spreadsheet models, boundary conditions, calibration, sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, particle tracking, and post-audit analysis. Application of MODFLOW to regional flow-system analysis. Computer laboratory emphasizes assigned problems that illustrate topics discussed in the course.

Geol 515. Paleoclimatology. (Dual-listed with 415). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: Four courses in biological or physical science. Introduction to mechanisms that drive climate, including the interplay between oceanic and atmospheric circulation and fluctuation in Earth's orbital parameters. Examination and analysis of past climate records ranging from historical documentation to ecological and geochemical proxies (e.g. tree ring analysis; O and C isotopes of skeletal carbonates and soils). Dating methods used to constrain and correlate climatic periods; utility of computer models to reconstruct past climates and predict future climate change. Emphasis placed on paleoclimatology and paleoecology of the late Quaternary (last ~ 1 million years).

Geol 519. Environmental Geochemistry. (Dual-listed with 419). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 511 or equivalent. Geochemistry of natural waters and water-rock interactions. Acid-base equilibria, carbonate chemistry and buffer systems, mineral dissolution and precipitation, sorption, ion exchange, and redox reactions. Introduction to thermodynamics and kinetics. Laboratory emphasizes chemical analysis of waters and computer modeling.

Geol 526. Stable Isotopes in the Environment. (Dual-listed with 426). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: Four courses in biological or physical science. Introduction to the theory, methods and applications of stable isotopes. Primary focus on the origin, natural abundance, and fractionation of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen isotopes. Applications of isotopic occurrence for elucidation of physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. Effects of plant physiology, photosynthesis, trophic structure, diffusion, evaporation, chemical precipitation, soil and atmospheric processes, and environmental factors on isotope abundance.

Geol 534. Contaminant Hydrogeology. (Dual-listed with 434). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Geol 511 or equivalent. Theory and practical considerations of fate and transport of solutes through porous geologic materials. Organic and inorganic contaminants in industrial and agricultural settings. Subsurface microbiology and biodegradation of aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Investigation of coupled processes (diffusion, advection, dispersion, sorption, and biodegradation) using computer models. Soil and groundwater monitoring and remediation strategies.

Geol 542. Optical Mineralogy. (1-2) Cr. 2. F.Prereq: 311. Introduction to using the microscope for mineral identification. Optical properties of minerals in immersion oils and in thin section. Research project required.

Geol 551. Applied and Environmental Geophysics. (Dual-listed with 451). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 100 or 201, Math 181 or equivalent experience. Seismic, gravity, magnetic, resistivity, electromagnetic, and ground-penetrating radar techniques for shallow subsurface investigations and imaging. Data interpretation methods. Lab emphasizes computer interpretation packages. Field work with seismic- and resistivity-imaging systems and radar.

Geol 552. GIS for Geoscientists. (Dual-listed with 452). (Cross-listed with Agron, EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Geol 100, 201 or equivalent. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with particular emphasis on geoscientific data. Uses ESRI's ArcGIS Desktop Software and extension modules. Emphasizes typical GIS operations and analyses in the geosciences to prepare students for advanced GIS courses.

Geol 555. Soil Clay Mineralogy. (Cross-listed with Agron). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: Agron 473, Chem 178. Recommend: Geol 311. Structure and behavior of clay minerals in soil environments, with emphasis on layer silicates and on Fe, Mn, and Al oxides.

Geol 555L. Soil Clay Mineralogy Laboratory. (Cross-listed with Agron). (0-3) Cr. 1. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 555. Thompson. Application of X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and chemical analyses to identification and behavior of clay minerals in soils.

Geol 557. Exploration Seismology. (Dual-listed with 457). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: 100 or 201, Math 181 or equivalent experience. Physics of elastic-wave propagation. Seismic surveys in environmental imaging, engineering, and petroleum exploration. Reflection and refraction techniques. Data collection, processing, and geological interpretation. Field work with state-of-the-art equipment.

Geol 558. Introduction to the 3D Visualization of Scientific Data. (Cross-listed with HCI, Com S). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: Graduate-student standing in the mathematical or natural sciences. Introduction to visualizing scientific information with 3D computer graphics and their foundation in human perception. Overview of different visualization techniques and examples of 3D visualization projects from different disciplines (natural sciences, medicine, engineering). Class project in interactive 3D visualization using the OpenDX, VTK or a similar system.

Geol 574. Glacial and Quaternary Geology. (Dual-listed with 474). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: 100 or 201. The study of the depositional and erosional processes of glaciers using modern glacier analogs and landforms. Discussion of glaciology, glacier hydrology, Quaternary history and stratigraphy, paleoclimatology, and causes of glaciation. Laboratory emphasizes aerial photo and topographic map interpretation and the Quaternary stratigraphy of Iowa. Two required field trips.

Geol 579. Surficial Processes. (Dual-listed with 479). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Geol 100 or 201 or equivalent experience. Study of surficial processes in modern and ancient geological environments. Topics include weathering, sediment transport, and landform genesis with emphasis on fluvial, glacial, hillslope, eolian, and coastal processes. Applications to engineering and environmental problems. Laboratory emphasizes aerial photo and topographic map interpretation.

Geol 590. Special Topics. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable.Prereq: Permission of instructor.
A. Surficial Processes
B. Stratigraphy
C. Sedimentation
D. Paleontology
E. Petrology
F. Structural Geology
G. Geochemistry
H. Hydrogeology
I. Earth Science
J. Mineral Resources
K. Geophysics
L. Mineralogy
M. Tectonics
N. Paleoecology and Paleoclimatology
O. Isotope Geochemistry
P. Computational Methods and GIS
R. Surface Hydrology

Geol 595. Graduate Seminar. Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.Prereq: Senior or graduate classification. Weekly seminar on topics of current research interest. All students seeking a graduate degree in geology must enroll during each semester of residence. Students pursuing a non-thesis option for the M.S. in Earth Science must enroll for one semester. Satisfactory-fail only.
A. Cr. 1. Presentation required.
B. Cr.
R. Attendance only.

Geol 599. Creative Component. Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Courses for graduate students

Geol 610. Advanced Seminar. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.Prereq: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.
A. Earth Materials
B. Economic Geology
C. Environmental Geochemistry
D. Geophysics
E. Geotectonics
F. Hydrogeology
G. Surficial Processes
H. Sedimentation and Stratigraphy
I. Paleoecology and Paleoclimatology
J. Isotope Geochemistry
K. Computational Methods and GIS

Geol 699. Research. Cr. arr. Repeatable.
A. Surficial Processes
B. Stratigraphy
C. Sedimentation
D. Paleontology
E. Petrology
F. Structural Geology
G. Geochemistry
H. Hydrogeology
I. Earth Science
J. Mineral Resources
K. Geophysics
L. Mineralogy
M. Tectonics
N. Paleoecology and Paleoclimatology
O. Isotope Geochemistry
P. Computational Methods and GIS
R. Surface Hydrology