Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2009-2011 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

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Community and Regional Planning

200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses |500 |600 |

Douglas Johnston, Chair of Department
Professors: Johnston, Mahayni
Professors (Emeritus): Shinn
Associate Professors: Borich, Bradbury, Coates, Owusu
Associate Professors (Emeritus): Huntington, Knox, Malone
Assistant Professors: Basmajian, Clapp, Haddad, Sandoval, Taylor, Trabalzi
Assistant Professors (Adjunct): Swenson
Lecturers: Jensen, Mehrotra

Undergraduate Study

For undergraduate curriculum in community and regional planning leading to the degree bachelor of science, see College of Design, Curricula.

Community and regional planning is a professional field of study aimed at assessing the ever-changing socioeconomic and physical environments of our communities and planning for their future. Planners evaluate and seize opportunities to understand and solve problems. Most planners work at the local level, but they are concerned with issues that affect the world: the preservation and enhancement of the quality of life in a community, the protection of the environment, the promotion of equitable economic opportunity; and the management of growth and change of all kinds.

Planning has its roots in landscape architecture, architecture, engineering, law, economics, and public administration. Most contemporary planners are trained in the physical and social sciences so they can understand the society and economy in which plans must be implemented. Planning demands technical competence as well as creativity, plus pragmatism and an ability to envision alternatives to the physical and social environments in which we live.

Graduates of the Community and Regional Planning department will be capable of performing in entry level positions in public planning agencies or with planning consulting firms. Graduates are able to integrate planning knowledge and skills in practical applications to current planning issues, and to communicate in written and oral form.

Graduates of the Community and Regional Planning Department are expected to have knowledge of the structure and functions of urban settlements, the history of planning, and aspects of plan and policy making. Graduates should have skills in problem formulation, quantitative analysis, written/oral and graphic communications, collaborative approaches to these, and in synthesizing and applying knowledge to practice. Graduates are expected to assess the impact of values in terms of equity and social justice, economic welfare and efficiency, environmental sustainability, and cultural heritage in the context of citizen involvement in decision making.

The curriculum is accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board of the American Institute of Certified Planners and the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning, thus providing the student with an education which, when combined with experience, supports the individual's eligibility for membership in the American Institute of Certified Planners.

The department cooperates in the undergraduate minors in design studies and environmental studies.

Graduate Study

The Department offers work for the Master of Community and Regional Planning degree with areas of concentration in land use and transportation, community design and development, and rural and environmental planning. In addition, students can design their own area of concentration if it does not fit in any of the three areas, with the assistance of their major professor. The program of graduate study is accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board of the American Institute of Certified Planners and the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning.

Degree requirements include completion of a 2-year, 48-credit program, including a thesis of 6 credits or a professional planning report of 4 credits. The planning core consists of C R P 501, 502, 511, 521, 523, 532, 561, and 592. Satisfactory completion of the core requirements and the acceptance of a thesis (6 credits) or a professional planning report (4 credits) are required for the M.C.R.P. degree. Students with a bachelors' degree in community and regional planning from an accredited planning school can waive up to 9 credits. The ability to waive credits is determined by a review of the coursework completed during undergraduate study, the grades received (only a grade of "B" or higher is acceptable) and the student's planning experience. The decision to waive up to 9 credits of the masters program should be made before first time registration for classes through a petition to the DOGE. In addition, the student is encouraged to complete three months of acceptable work experience in a planning office between the first and second year of study. No foreign language is required for the degree master of community and regional planning.

Double degree programs are offered with architecture (M.C.R.P/M.Arch.), business (M.C.R.P./M.B.A.), public administration (M.C.R.P./M.P.A.), and landscape architecture (M.C.R.P./M.L.A.). The department also participates in the interdepartmental major in transportation.

The department also offers a 13-credit graduate certificate in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in spatial analysis, GIS applications and program management. The program is open to graduate students in all disciplines of the University. Information guides for the graduate degree and certificate may be obtained from the department office at the department's web page at: www.design.iastate.edu/CRP/

CRP currently offers several courses via distance learning to graduates and planning professionals interested in expanding their knowledge of planning. Further details of current distance course offerings may be found on the CRP website and on the ISU Continuing Education website. For more information, send an e-mail to crp@iastate.edu

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

C R P 253. Survey of Community and Regional Planning. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.A historical survey of planning, the nature and problems of urban areas, and the goals, procedures, and results of urban planning.

C R P 270. Forces Shaping Our Metropolitan Environment. (Cross-listed with Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Must be taken prior to completing 9 credits in C R P. Introduction to the social, political, physical, and economic forces as they shape metropolitan areas. A comprehensive picture of metropolitan development showing important roles other urban disciplines play in the planning process and the interrelationships of the disciplines.

C R P 272. Planning Analysis and Techniques I. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Existing and emerging techniques for preparation of community planning studies. Sources of planning information and data. Survey techniques including survey instruments, sampling methods, sample size for demographic studies. Land use surveys for comprehensive and transportation planning. Student's oral and graphic presentation of analytical results. Laboratory emphasizes practical uses and computer applications for data analysis.

C R P 274. Planning Analysis and Techniques II. (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 272. Use of quantitative methods for analysis of population, land use, economic and transportation make-up of a community; activities and location, intensity, and timing of land uses and public services. Student's oral and graphic presentation of analytical results. Laboratory emphasizes practical uses and computer applications for data analysis.

C R P 291. World Cities and Globalization. (Cross-listed with Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: Sophomore classification. World cities and globalization in developed and developing countries. Topics include globalization, world cities and regions, uneven economic development, the international division of labor, multinational corporations, international environmentalism, tourism, popular culture and place- based identity.

C R P 293. Environmental Planning. (Cross-listed with Dsn S, Env S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Sophomore classification. Comprehensive overview of the field of environmental relationships and the efforts being made to organize, control, and coordinate environmental, aesthetic, and cultural characteristics of land, air, and water.

C R P 320. Urban Form. (Cross-listed with Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: 253 or 270, or permission of instructor. Examines how urban form is shaped, what constitutes good urban form, and what are the trends in emerging urban forms. Descriptive, explanatory and normative theories of urban form, and the relationships between urban form and social, economic, political, cultural, and institutional forms.

C R P 330. Practicum. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Major in community and regional planning. Structured work experience under close supervision of a professional planner. Practical planning experience; relationships between theory and practice, professional responsibilities, and the scope of various planning roles.

C R P 331. Professional Practice Seminar. (Dual-listed with 531). (1-0) Cr. 1. S.Prereq: Major in community and regional planning. Preparation for working in a planning office; discussion of expectation of employer; presentations from planning professionals, and discussion of differences/similarities between public and private planning offices. Satisfactory-fail only.

C R P 332. Community Planning Studio I. (2-4) Cr. 4. F.Prereq: 253, 274. Application of planning methods and skills to issue identification and investigation. Introduction to problem formulation, study, and analysis in a community setting.

C R P 376. Rural, Urban and Regional Economics. (Cross-listed with Econ). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: Econ 101. Firm location with respect to regional resources, transport, scale economies, externalities, and policies. Measures of local comparative advantage and specialization. Spatial markets. Population location considering jobs, wages, commuting, and local amenities. Business, residential, and farm land use and value. Migration. Other topics may include market failure, regulation, the product cycle, theories of rural and urban development, developmental policy, firm recruiting, local public goods and public finance, schools, poverty, segregation, and crime. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C R P 383. Theory of the Planning Process. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 253, junior status. The nature of planning and its relation to social and economic planning; levels of planning, place of planning in decision making; steps in the planning process, uses and limitation of knowledge in planning, relation of facts and values.

C R P 391. Field Travel. Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: CRP major and permission of instructor. Observation of professional practice and community or regional problems and issues. Satisfactory-fail only.

C R P 410. Professional Work Experience. Cr. R. F.S.SS.Prereq: Permission of department chair. Approved professional work experience.

C R P 416. Urban Design and Practice. (Dual-listed with 516). (3-6) Cr. 6. S.Prereq: 253 or 270. Principles of urban design and their application to residential and commercial development in studio projects.

C R P 417. Urban Revitalization. (Dual-listed with 517). (Cross-listed with Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 253 or 270. Planning methods available to further revitalization and preservation efforts, with particular attention to housing and neighborhoods. Relationship between neighborhood change and urban development process; public policy implications.

C R P 425. Growth Management. (Dual-listed with 525). (Cross-listed with Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: Junior classification. Review of techniques used to manage growth-related change and to implement plans. Capital investment strategies; public land acquisition and protection; development impact analysis; impact mitigation, including impact fees; phased growth systems; urban, suburban and rural relationships; and land preservation.

C R P 429. International Planning. (Dual-listed with 529). (Cross-listed with Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Junior classification. Introduction to issues in planning and governance in an international setting. Problems and strategies may include population movement and change, economic globalization, urban growth, rural development, and housing.

C R P 432. Community Planning Studio II. (1-6) Cr. 4. F.S.SS.Prereq: 332, 383. Integration of planning methods and theory in dealing with a community planning problem. Analysis of problem and formulation of strategies for implementation. Preparation of a community planning report.

C R P 435. Planning in Small Towns. (Dual-listed with 535). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: 253, 270, or junior classification. Contemporary planning problems in small towns and the design of viable strategies to enhance their social and economic position in today's society.

C R P 442. Site Development. (Dual-listed with 542). (Cross-listed with Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 253, 272. Introduction to site analysis using landscape architecture and environmental principles, drawing also on basic engineering concepts. Work will evolve from analysis to land development design.

C R P 445. Transportation Policy Planning. (Dual-listed with 545). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: C E 350 or equivalent. Comprehensive overview of key policy issues related to transportation planning and investment in the United States and abroad. Policy issues explored include safety, environmental impact, sustainable communities, and economic development. Policy analysis and planning are studied in conjunction with each policy issue explored. Issues of concern to state, metropolitan, and local governments.

C R P 451. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. (Dual-listed with 551). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.Introduction to geographic information systems, including discussions of GIS hardware, software, data structures, data acquisition, data presentation, analytical techniques, and implementation procedures. Laboratory emphasizes practical applications and uses of GIS.

C R P 452. Geographic Data Management and Planning Analysis. (Dual-listed with 552). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: C R P 451 or equivalent. Extensive coverage of geo-relational database concept and design, GIS database creation and maintenance, geographic data manipulation and analysis. GIS output generation and geographic data presentation. Laboratory emphasizes practical applications and uses of GIS.

C R P 455. Community Economic Development. (Dual-listed with 555). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: Sophomore classification. The nature and process of economic development in the context of community development. Recent changes and trends and their implications for local and regional development. Selected case studies and applications. Contemporary community economic development issues.

C R P 475. Grant Writing. (Dual-listed with 575). (1-0) Cr. 1. F.Prereq: 253 or 270 and junior classification. A short introduction to effective grant writing for the public and non-profit sectors. Includes identifying appropriate funding sources for an organization, identifying goals and objectives, and budgeting.

C R P 481. Regional and State Planning. (Dual-listed with 581). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 253 or 270. Analysis of theories, policies, and functions at the metropolitan, regional, and state levels with emphasis on area-wide governance structures and strategies for guiding development.

C R P 484. Sustainable Communities. (Dual-listed with 584). (Cross-listed with Dsn S, Env S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: Senior classification. The history and theory of sustainable community planning. Procedural and substantive dimensions. Case studies of communities engaged in sustainability planning. Use and development of indicators.

C R P 490. Independent Study. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Written approval of instructor and department chair on required form. Investigation of an approved topic commensurate with student's interest and ability. Satisfactory-fail only.
H. Honors

C R P 491. Environmental Law and Planning. (Dual-listed with 591). (Cross-listed with Dsn S, Env S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 6 credits in natural sciences. Environmental law and policy as applied in planning at the local and state levels. Brownfields, environmental justice, water quality, air quality, wetland and floodplain management, and local government involvement in ecological protection through land use planning and other programs.

C R P 492. Planning Law, Administration and Implementation. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 383. The basis in constitutional, common, and statutory law for the powers of plan effectuation. Problems of balancing public and private interests as revealed in the study of leading court cases. Administration of planning agencies and programs.

C R P 494. Senior Seminar in Planning. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Senior classification, 332 should be taken prior to or concurrently. An advanced forum for seniors that focuses upon recent trends and important issues affecting planning today. Topics addressed will vary. A demonstration of understanding current issues and their affects upon planning applications is expected.

C R P 498. Portfolio Development and Review. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S.Should be taken in the final semester of the planning program. Preparation of a portfolio of student work that represents student learning throughout the entire planning program.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

C R P 501. Methods I. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Graduate classification and Stat 401. Applications of quantitative methods in planning with emphasis on the collection, description, analysis, presentation, and interpretation of planning data. Primary data collection using survey techniques. Secondary data types and sources of planning information for population projection and demographic analysis.

C R P 502. Methods II. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Graduate classification and 501. Investigative and participatory methods for citizen involvement and planning research including public meetings and processes, consultation, case studies, and focus groups. Research design for planning practice, and thesis and professional report proposal development.

C R P 504. Why Change Anything?. (Cross-listed with Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: Graduate classification. Introduction to a range of approaches to justifying innovations, changes, and interventions proposed by designers, planners, and artists. Reasons for change and their bases in social, philosophical, and design reasoning; and their usefulness in justifying change to different audiences. Investigation of fallacies, ideologies, and contemporary problems in justifications.

C R P 510. Professional Work Experience. Cr. R. F.S.SS.Prereq: Permission of department chair. Approved professional work experience.

C R P 511. Introduction to Community and Regional Planning. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Graduate classification. Development of planning in the United States; history and evolution of the planning profession and constructs of current practice. Theoretical basis of planning.

C R P 516. Urban Design Practice. (Dual-listed with 416). (3-6) Cr. 6. S.Prereq: Graduate classification. Principles of urban design and their application to residential and commercial development in studio project.

C R P 517. Urban Revitalization. (Dual-listed with 417). (Cross-listed with Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: Graduate classification. Planning methods available to further revitalization and preservation efforts, with particular attention to housing and neighborhoods. Relationship between neighborhood change and urban development process; public policy implications.

C R P 519. Middle Eastern Cities. (Cross-listed with Arch). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Graduate or senior standing. Middle Eastern cities introduce a particular continuity between history and contemporary life where in some cases the latter is about re-defining the former. Introduction to basic academic writings on Middle Eastern cities in addition to other contemporary cultural productions of the region. Study of various aspects of Middle Eastern life and the built environments that this life produces.

C R P 521. Land Use Planning. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Graduate classification. Theories of the origin and growth of urban places and the dynamics of urban structure and land use. Methods and techniques for making land use plans dealing with orderly, efficient, and equitable development and arrangement of land uses within the planning process. Examination of the interrelationships among land use, transportation, environment, and infrastructure and public facilities.

C R P 523. Economic Analysis and the Financing of Public Planning Projects. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Graduate classification. Analytical approaches to local and regional economic change and performance in the context of the changing economic geography of the U.S. Traditional and contemporary approaches to industrial location theory and analysis. Recent developments in public sector finance, capital budgeting, project evaluation and the financing of planning projects and economic development activity.

C R P 525. Growth Management. (Dual-listed with 425). (Cross-listed with Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: Graduate classification. Review of techniques used to manage growth-related change and to implement plans. Capital investment strategies; public land acquisition and protection; development impact analysis; impact mitigation, including impact fees; phased growth systems; urban, suburban, rural relationships; and land preservation.

C R P 529. International Planning. (Dual-listed with 429). (Cross-listed with Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Graduate classification. Introduction to issues in planning and governance in an international setting. Problems and strategies may include population movement and change, economic globalization, urban growth, rural development, and housing.

C R P 530. Practicum. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Graduate classification in community and regional planning. Practical planning experience. Structured work in range of tasks under close supervision of a professional planner. Relationships between theory and practice, exposure to variety of roles in functioning specialties. Satisfactory-fail only.

C R P 531. Professional Practice Seminar. (Dual-listed with 331). (1-0) Cr. 1. S.Prereq: Graduate classification. Preparation for working in a planning office; discussion of expectations of employer; presentations from planning professionals, and discussion of differences and similarities between public and private planning offices. Satisfactory-fail only.

C R P 532. Community Planning Studio. (1-6) Cr. 4. F.SS.Prereq: 521, 523. Integration of planning methods and theory in dealing with a community planning problem. Analysis of problem and formulation of strategies for implementation. Preparation of a community planning report.

C R P 535. Planning in Small Towns. (Dual-listed with 435). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: Graduate classification. Contemporary planning problems in small towns and the design of viable strategies to enhance their social and economic position in today's society.

C R P 542. Site Development. (Dual-listed with 442). (Cross-listed with Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: Graduate classification. Introduction to site analysis using landscape architecture and environmental principles, but drawing also on basic engineering concepts. Work will evolve from analysis to land development design based on that analysis.

C R P 545. Transportation Policy Planning. (Dual-listed with 445). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Graduate classification. Comprehensive overview of key policy issues related to transportation planning and investment in the United States and abroad. Policy issues explored include safety, environmental impact, sustainable communities, and economic development. Tools like policy analysis and planning are studied in conjunction with each policy issue explored. Issues of concern to state, metropolitan, and local governments.

C R P 551. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. (Dual-listed with 451). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.Introduction to geographic information systems, including discussions of GIS hardware, software, data structures, data acquisition, data presentation, analytical techniques, and implementation procedures. Laboratory emphasizes practical applications and uses of GIS.

C R P 552. Geographic Data Management and Planning Analysis. (Dual-listed with 452). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: 551. Extensive coverage of geo-relational database concept and design, GIS database creation and maintenance, geographic data manipulation and analysis. GIS output generation and geographic data presentation. Laboratory emphasizes practical applications and uses of GIS.

C R P 553. Analytical Planning/GIS. (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 451/551. Integration of exploratory, participatory and predictive spatial analyses and 3D visualization into the planning process. GIS tools and techniques are used to automate decision analysis and facilitate future planning in analyzing and visualizing planning actions. Laboratory emphasizes practical uses of GIS tools and techniques.

C R P 555. Community Economic Development. (Dual-listed with 455). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: Graduate classification. The nature and process of economic development in the context of community development. Recent changes and trends and their implications for local and regional development. Selected case studies and applications. Contemporary community economic development issues.

C R P 561. Seminar in Planning Theory. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: graduate classification. Current planning theories: comprehensive land use, advocacy, participatory, radical, and transactive planning models. Decision making and organization models as they affect planning practice. Value conflicts and conflict resolution.

C R P 575. Grant Writing. (Dual-listed with 475). (1-0) Cr. 1. F.Prereq: Graduate classification. A short introduction to effective grant writing for the public and non-profit sectors. Includes identifying appropriate funding sources for an organization, identifying goals and objectives, and budgeting.

C R P 581. Regional and State Planning. (Dual-listed with 481). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: Graduate classification. Analysis of theories, policies, and functions at the metropolitan, regional, and state levels with emphasis on area-wide governance structures and strategies for guiding development.

C R P 584. Sustainable Communities. (Dual-listed with 484). (Cross-listed with Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: Graduate classification. The history and theory of sustainable community planning. Procedural and substantive dimensions. Case studies of communities engaged in sustainability planning. Use and development of indicators.

C R P 590. Special Topics. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Graduate classification and written approval of instructor and department chair on required form.
A. Planning Law, Administration and Implementation
B. Economic Development
C. Urban Design
D. Housing and Urban Revitalization
H. Environmental Planning
I. Land Use and Transportation Planning
N. International Planning
O. Spatial Analytical Methods
P. Planning in Small Towns
Q. Diversity and Equity in Planning
R. Geographic Information Systems

C R P 591. Environmental Law and Planning. (Dual-listed with 491). (Cross-listed with Dsn S, L A). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Graduate classification. Environmental law and policy as applied in planning at the local and state levels. Brownfields, environmental justice, water quality, air quality, wetland and floodplain management, and local government involvement in ecological protection through land use planning and other programs.

C R P 592. Land Use and Development Regulation Law. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Graduate classification. An in-depth analysis of the legal constructs that shape the practice of planning and plan implementation in the United States. An exploration of how land use regulations are applied to reconcile the competing needs and diverse uses of land. The positive and negative consequences of developing and implementing regulatory controls will be addressed.

C R P 595. Seminar in GIS Applications/Research. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S.Prereq: 9 credits in GIS Certificate program. Discussion and demonstration of current GIS applications and research in multiple disciplines. Satisfactory-fail only.

C R P 599. Professional Planning Report. Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Independent student research on planning topic. The course will serve as a capstone experience for the student, demonstrating ability to integrate planning knowledge and skills in the practical application of the student's abilities on a current planning issue. The completed report must be submitted to and approved by the POS committee as evidence of the mastery of the principles of community and regional planning.

Courses for graduate students

C R P 699. Research. Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.SS.