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2009-2011 Courses and Programs

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Classical Studies

200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses |500 |

www.iastate.edu/~classics

(Interdepartmental Undergraduate Program)

Program Committee: M. Henry, Chair; G. Betcher, T. Butler, J. Cunnally, J. Goodwin, M. Graham, J. Hagge, D. Hollander, R. Meyer, M. Mook

The Classical Studies program is a cross-disciplinary program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences which offers an integrated curriculum of courses in the languages, literatures, history, and thought of ancient Greece and Rome from prehistoric times to the reign of the Emperor Constantine. Complete and current information about the Program may be found on-line at: www.iastate.edu/~classics/ .

Courses in Classical Studies provide background for students whose major fields of study or career interests include Anthropology, English, World Languages and Cultures, History, Music, Philosophy, Women's Studies, law, medicine, material culture, political science, the life sciences and related fields. Students who wish to pursue an interdisciplinary major in Classical Studies should consult the Program Chair. A student who wishes to declare a minor must successfully complete the following requirements: (a) Greek 102 or Latin 102; (b) Cl St 273 or 275; (c) Three additional courses (nine credits) from the courses listed below (primary or departmental), or as approved by the program committee

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

Cl St 273. Greek and Roman Mythology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.SS.Survey of the legends, myths of the classical world with emphasis on the principal gods, and heroes, and their relation to ancient social, psychological, and religious practices; some attention may be given to important modern theories.
H. Honors (4-0) Cr. 4.

Cl St 275. The Ancient City. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Examination of ancient urban life, including historical context, physical space, material culture, religion, literature, and art; examination of civic identity (the "polis"). Contrast between the concepts of urban and rural. Examples drawn from specific ancient cities; some attention to modern methods of recovering the conditions of ancient urban life and the fundamental concept of the city in European history.
H. Honors. (4-0) Cr. 4.

Cl St 304. Cultural Heritage of the Ancient World. (Cross-listed with Hist). (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: Sophomore classification. Historical examination of art, literature, thought, and religious beliefs of major civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean countries until the end of the 8th century.

Cl St 310. Ancient Philosophy. (Cross-listed with Phil). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Phil 201. Survey of ancient Greek philosophy, focusing on the pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. Questions concerning being, knowledge, language, and the good life are treated in depth. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Cl St 350. Rhetorical Theories and Issues in Context. (Cross-listed with Engl, Sp Cm). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Engl 250. Ideas about the relationship between rhetoric and society in contemporary and historical contexts. An exploration of classical and contemporary rhetorical theories in relation to selected topics that may include politics, gender, race, ethics, education, science, or technology.

Cl St 353. World Literature: Western Foundations through Renaissance. (Cross-listed with Engl). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: Engl 250. Representative works from the drama, epics, poetry, and prose of the Ancient World through the late sixteenth century. May include Homer, Aeschylus, Sappho, Catullus, Dante, Marie de France, Boccaccio, Christine de Pizan, Cervantes, and others.

Cl St 367. Christianity in the Roman Empire. (Cross-listed with Relig). (3-0) Cr. 3.An historical introduction to the rise of Christianity in the Roman empire, with special attention to the impact of Greco-Roman culture on the thought and practice of Christians and the interaction of early Christians with their contemporaries. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Cl St 372. Greek and Roman Tragedy and Comedy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 273 or 275 or one course in Latin or Greek or English 250. Greek and Roman drama from the beginnings until today. Readings in English from authors such as Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, Terence, Seneca. Course may cover performance, theories of comedy and tragedy, recent and current expressions of the comic and tragic in film and other media.
H. Honors (4-0) Cr. 4.

Cl St 373. Heroes of Greece, Rome, and Today.. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 273 or 275 or one course in Latin or Greek or English 250.. Cultural and political significance of ancient epic, especially in Greece and Rome. Course may include study of the heroic code in antiquity and its modern expressions including in film. Readings in English from authors such as Homer and Vergil.
H. Honors (4-0) Cr. 4.

Cl St 374. Women in the Ancient Mediterranean World. (Cross-listed with Hist, W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. S.Prereq: Any one course in Cl St, W S, Latin, or Greek. Chronological and topical survey of the status of women in the Ancient Mediterranean world; study of constructs of the female and the feminine. Readings from ancient and modern sources. Emphasis on either the Greek world and Hellenistic Egypt, or Hellenistic Egypt and Rome.
A. Hellenic World and Hellenistic Egypt
B. Roman World including Roman Egypt

Cl St 376. Classical Archaeology. (Cross-listed with Hist, Relig). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. S.Chronological survey of the material culture of the ancient Greece-Roman world and the role of archaeological context in understanding the varied aspects of ancient Greek or Roman culture. Among other topics, economy, architecture, arts and crafts, trade and exchange, religion and burial customs will be explored.
A. Bronze Age (Minoan and Mycenaean palatial cultures) and Early Iron Age Greece. (ca 3000-700 BCE).
B. Archaic through Hellenistic Greece (ca 700-30 BCE).

Cl St 383. Greek and Roman Art. (Cross-listed with Art H, Dsn S). (3-0) Cr. 3.Greek art from Neolithic through Hellenistic periods. Roman art from the traditional founding to t he end of the empire in the West. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Cl St 394. The Archaeology of Greece: An Introduction. (2-0) Cr. 2. S.Introduction to the topography, history, archaeology, monuments and art of Greece from the Bronze Age through the Ottoman period; attention given to the culture of modern Greece, preparatory to study abroad in Greece (Cl St 395).

Cl St 395. Study Abroad: The Archaeology of Greece. Cr. 2-6. SS.Prereq: 394. Supervised on-site instruction in the archaeology, monuments, and art of Greece from the Bronze Age through the Ottoman period; attention given to the culture of modern Greece.

Cl St 402. Greek Civilization.. (Cross-listed with Hist). (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: Sophomore classification. Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period; evolution of the Greek polis and its cultural contributions with a particular emphasis on the writings of Herodotus and Thucydides.

Cl St 403. Roman Civilization.. (Cross-listed with Hist). (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: Sophomore classification. Ancient Rome from the Regal Period to the Fall of the Western Empire; evolution of Roman institutions and Rome's cultural contributions studied through original sources. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Cl St 404. Roman Social History.. (Cross-listed with Hist). (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: Sophomore classification. Examines major topics in Roman social history during the late Republic and early Empire such as class, family, slavery, religion and the economy. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Cl St 430. Western Political Thought: Plato to Machiavelli. (Cross-listed with Pol S). (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: 6 credits in political science, philosophy, or European history. Major concepts in original texts of classical, medieval, and renaissance authors: justice, community, man's basic nature; natural law; force; society outside the political order. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Cl St 480. Seminar in Classical Studies. (3-0) Cr. 3.Prereq: 30 credits in Classical Studies or related courses, permission of Program Chair. Advanced study of a selected topic in Classical Studies. Research paper or project selected by the student.

Cl St 490. Independent Study. Cr. 1-6. Repeatable.Prereq: 7 credits in classical studies at the 200 level or higher; permission of the Program Chair. Designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study specific topics in classical civilization in areas where courses are not offered, or to pursue such study beyond the limits of existing courses.

Courses for graduate students, major or minor, open to qualified undergraduates

Cl St 512A. Proseminar in Ancient European History. (Cross-listed with Hist). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable.Prereq: Permission of instructor. Readings in European history.
A. Ancient (Same as HIST 512A)

Cl St 594A. Seminar in Ancient European History. (Cross-listed with Hist). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable.Prereq: Permission of instructor. Topics vary each time offered.
A. Ancient (Same as HIST 594A)

Primary Courses (Offered by Other Departments) Art H 383. Greek and Roman Art. See Art and Design. Greek 101. Elementary Ancient Greek I. See World Languages and Cultures. Greek 102. Elementary Ancient Greek II. See World Languages and Cultures. Greek 201. Intermediate Classical Greek. See World Languages and Cultures. Greek 332. Introduction to Classical Greek Literature. See World Languages and Cultures. Greek 441. Advanced Readings in Greek Literature. See World Languages and Cultures. Greek 442. Advanced Topics in Greek Literature. See World Languages and Cultures. Greek 490. Independent Study. See Foreign Language and Literature website. ( www.language.iastate.edu ) Hist 280. Introduction to History of Science I. See History. Latin 101. Elementary Latin I. See World Languages and Cultures. Latin 102. Elementary Latin II. See World Languages and Cultures. Latin 201. Intermediate Latin. See World Languages and Cultures. Latin 332. Introduction to Latin Literature. See World Languages and Cultures. Latin 441. Advanced Readings in Latin Literature. See World Languages and Cultures. Latin 442. Advanced Topics in Latin Literature. See World Languages and Cultures. Latin 490. Independent Study. See World Languages and Cultures website. ( www.language.iastate.edu )