Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2009-2011 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

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Anthropology

200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses |500 |600 |

www.Anthr.iastate.edu/

R. Paul Lasley, Chair of Department
Professors: Lasley, Whiteford
Professors (Emeritus): Bower, Butler, Gradwohl, Huang
Associate Professors: Coinman, Ilahiane, Pruetz
Associate Professors (Emeritus): Wolff
Assistant Professors: Arndt, Dusselier, Hill, Moutsatsos, Viatori
Lecturers: Folinsbee, Johnsen

Undergraduate Study

An undergraduate major in Anthropology can Serve as the nucleus for a general liberal education, or as the prerequisite for graduate training qualifying a person for positions in (1) college and university teaching, (2) research, and (3) administrative and applied positions in government, development organizations, museums, and private businesses or corporations.

Anthropology graduates develop a well-rounded professional education in four fields of anthropology: cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, archaeology, and biological anthropology. They learn what it means to be human through the study of culture and social relations, human biology and evolution, languages, music, art, architecture, and through the study of past human communities. Graduates learn the important historical and contemporary issues of our subdisciplines, and they learn what it means to be a "modern" Anthropologist and a citizen in an international and global community. Graduates develop an appreciation of the value of cultural diversity at the local, national and international level. They acquire a particular holistic vision that requires using a repertoire of methods in order to forge a deeper understanding of cultural contexts, both past and present. Undergraduate students may obtain experience in archaeological, ethnological and biological research.

Anthropology majors may choose either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree, both of which require 33 credits in anthropology. A bachelor of arts degree is obtained by fulfilling the college general education requirements plus 6 additional credits in Groups I, II, and/or IV. A bachelor of science degree is obtained by fulfilling the college general education requirements plus 6 additional credits in Group III.

Undergraduate students with majors in anthropology are required to take the following anthropology core courses: 306, 307, 308, 309 and 450. One course in statistics is required.

Undergraduates majoring in anthropology are required to have a minor or a second major. A minor usually consists of 15 credits minimum. A minor in anthropology consists of at least 15 credits and must include 306 or 309 and 307 or 308, and at least 3 other credits in courses numbered 300 or above.

Communication Proficiency requirement: The department requires that a student earn a grade of C or better in Engl 250 and either English 302 or 309 or 314.

The principal subdisciplines of anthropology are represented by the following:

1. General cultural anthropology and ethnology: 201, 230, 250, 257, 306, 313, 322, 323, 325, 326, 327, 335, 340, 411, 412, 418, 431, 432, 434B, 436, 439, 444, 450, 451B, 490B, 491.

2. Archaeology: 202, 308, 315, 321, 337, 414, 416, 420, 428, 429, 434A, 450, 451A, 427I, 490A.

3. Linguistic Anthropology: 309, 451D, 490D.

4. Biological Anthropology: 202, 307, 319, 424, 434C, 438, 445, 451C, 490C.

Graduate Study

The department offers work for the degree master of arts with a major in anthropology. Graduate courses are offered in the areas of biological anthropology, archaeology, cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, history and theory, and methodology. Competence in one foreign language and in statistics must be demonstrated. A thesis, generally based on original fieldwork, is required.

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

Anthr 201. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.Comparative study of culture as key to understanding human behaviors in different societies. Using a global, cross-cultural perspective, patterns of family life, economic and political activities, religious beliefs, and the ways in which cultures change are examined.

Anthr 202. Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.Human biological and cultural evolution; survey of the evidence from fossil forms and archaeology, as well as living primates and traditional cultures; introduction to methods of study in archaeology and biological anthropology.

Anthr 230. Globalization and the Human Condition. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.An introduction to understanding key global issues in the contemporary world. Focuses on social relations, cultural practices and political-economic linkages among Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and the Pacific.

Anthr 250. Contemporary Muslim Societies. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.An introduction to understanding key local and global issues facing Muslim society. Focus on cultural, social, political, religious, and ecological forces shaping contemporary Muslim societies and linkages with the non-Muslim world.

Anthr 306. Cultural Anthropology. (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 201. Survey of the major theoretical, methodological and empirical foundations of cultural anthropology. Participatory lab: focus on ethnographic methods through individual research projects.

Anthr 307. Biological Anthropology. (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 202. Human evolution as known from fossil evidence, comparative primate studies, and genetic variations in living populations. Laboratory-tutorial sessions include study and discussion of human osteology, fossil hominids, simple Mendelian traits, and bio-ethics in applied biological anthropology.

Anthr 308. Archaeology. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 202. Methods and techniques for the recovery and interpretation of archaeological evidence, its role in reconstructing human behavior and past environments. Laboratory sessions include experience in the interpretation of archaeological evidence, the use of classification systems, and prehistoric technologies such as ceramics and stone tools. Field trips.

Anthr 309. Linguistic Anthropology. (Cross-listed with Ling). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 201. Language as a human attribute; language versus animal communication; human communication in cultural context; paralanguage, kinesics, proxemics, artifacts as communication; language and culture; cross-cultural sociolinguistics; ethnoscience; and language policies. Participatory lab: focus on analysis of a non-Western language and communication system.

Anthr 313. The Family and Kinship in Cross-Cultural Perspective. (Dual-listed with 513). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 201 recommended. Comparative and historical overview of family, marriage and kinship crossculturally; discussion of differences in the structure, cycle, and functioning of family and kin relations through ethnographic readings, including Euro-American examples; current critical and theoretical issues in kinship studies, especially integrating work on gender, sexuality and representation.

Anthr 315. Archaeology of North America. (Dual-listed with 515). (Cross-listed with Am In). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 202 or 308. Prehistory and early history of North America as reconstructed from archaeological evidence; peopling of the New World; culture-historical sequences of major culture areas; linkages of archaeological traditions with selected ethnohistorically known Native American groups.

Anthr 319. Skeletal Biology. (Dual-listed with 519). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 307 or college level biology. Comprehensive study of the skeletal anatomy, physiology, genetics, growth, development and population variation of the human skeleton. Applications to forensic anthropology, paleopathology and bioarchaeology are introduced.

Anthr 321. World Prehistory. (Dual-listed with 521). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 202 recommended. An introduction to archaeological sites from around the world including the Near East, Africa, Europe, Mesoamerica, and North and South America. Emphasis is on the interpretation of material cultural remains in reconstructing past societies.

Anthr 322. Peoples and Cultures of Native North America. (Dual-listed with 522). (Cross-listed with Am In). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.SS.Prereq: 201 or Am In 210. Origin, distribution, and traditional life of native peoples of North America. Survey of culture areas; ecology and subsistence, language, kinship, life cycle, political, economic, and religious systems; impact of European contact.

Anthr 323. Topics in Latin American Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 523). (Cross-listed with Am In). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. S.Prereq: Anthr 201 or 306 recommended. Exploration of contemporary Latin American social dynamics within specific historical, political and economic contexts; discussion of current ethnographic approaches to studying key sociocultural issues in Latin America. Topics vary each time offered.
A. Violence and Memory
B. Social movements and Democracy
C. Race, Class and Gender
D. Regional Focus

Anthr 325. Peoples and Cultures of Africa. (Dual-listed with 525). (Cross-listed with Af Am). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 201 or 306 recommended. Origins and distribution of peoples of Africa; geographical characteristics as related to culture types, including early civilizations; a comparative examination of economic, subsistence, language, social and political organization, and religious systems throughout the continent; change processes, the impact of colonialism, and the nature of contemporary African societies.

Anthr 335. Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East. (Dual-listed with 535). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 201 or 306 recommended. Anthropological approaches to the study of Middle East cultures. Survey of major culture areas, discussion of economic, political, and social and religious issues and systems. Examination of contemporary social movements.

Anthr 337. Andean Archaeology. (Dual-listed with 537). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 202 or 321 recommended. Survey of prehistoric Andean cultures of Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador; the archaeology of the Incas and their ancestors. Emphasis on prehistoric economic, religious, and political organization, the rich material culture recovered through archaeological records; and the use of ethnohistoric texts and modern ethnographies to reconstruct the prehistory of Andean societies.

Anthr 340. Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion. (Dual-listed with 540). (Cross-listed with Relig). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 201 or 306. Origin and development of indigenous magico-religious systems; myth and ritual; therapeutic aspects; symbols and meanings; religion and sociocultural change, including acculturation, nativistic, and revitalization movements.

Anthr 350. Primate Behavior. (Dual-listed with 550). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.Prereq: Anthr 202 and/or basic biology course recommended.. An introduction to the Order Primates with a focus on their behavior. Biological and social adaptations of monkeys, apes, and prosimians; basic evolutionary concepts, current trends and theories in the field of Primatology and issues related to primate conservation.

Anthr 411. Culture Change and Applied Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 511). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 201 or 306. Theoretical and practical considerations of human cultural development. Examination of theories of cultural change, culture contact and acculturation. Dynamics of directed change in contemporary world cultures. Principles, theories, and ethics of international development projects from a sociocultural perspective.

Anthr 412. Psychological Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 512). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 201 or 306. Relationship of cultural, social and personality factors in human behavior. Cross-cultural comparisons of child rearing practices, cognitive development, mental health, deviancy, ethno-psychiatry, altered states of consciousness, and psychological dimensions of culture change.

Anthr 414. Southwestern Archaeology. (Dual-listed with 514). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 308 or 315 or 321. Prehistoric archaeology of the American Southwest, including the Paleo-indian and Archaic periods; the adoption of agriculture; the emergence of pueblo societies; relationships with contemporary Southwest cultures.

Anthr 418. Global Culture, Consumption and Modernity. (Dual-listed with 518). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Anthr 201 or 306 recommended. Cross-cultural study of the impact of globalization, with an emphasis on economic consumption and the movement of goods, ideas, and peoples across cultural and national boundaries.

Anthr 420. Cultural Continuity and Change in the Prairie-Plains. (Dual-listed with 520). (Cross-listed with Am In). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 315 or 322. Ecological adaptations, sociocultural changes, and continuities of traditions among Prairie and Plains Indian groups through time; impacts of Euro-American society and technology on Indians of the Great Plains; perspectives from ecology, archaeology, ethnology, history, and contemporary literary sources.

Anthr 424. Forensic Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 524). (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 319. Comprehensive study of forensic anthropology, a specialized subfield of biological anthropology. Emphasis is placed on personal identifications from extremely fragmentary, comingled, burnt, cremated and incomplete skeletal remains. All parameters of forensic study are included as they pertain to anthropology, including human variation, taphonomy, entomology, archaeology, pathology, epidemiology; genetics and the non-biological forensic disciplines. An appreciation for the wide range of medicolegal and bioethical issues will also be gained.

Anthr 427I. Archaeology. (Cross-listed with Ia LL). Cr. 4. SS.Nature of cultural and environmental evidence in archaeology and how they are used to model past human behavior and land use; emphasis on Iowa prehistory; basic reconnaissance surveying and excavation techniques. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Anthr 428. Topics in Archaeological Laboratory Methods and Techniques. (Dual-listed with 528). (2-2) Cr. 3. Repeatable. S.Prereq: 308. Laboratory processing, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological materials such as lithics, ceramics, and faunal remains. Laboratory sessions emphasize analytical techniques including classification, data acquisition and organization, and computer applications
A. Lithics
B. Ceramics
C. Faunal remains
D. General.

Anthr 429. Archaeological Field School. (Dual-listed with 529). Cr. 4-6. SS.Prereq: 202 or 308. Summer field school for training in archaeological reconnaissance and excavation techniques; documentation and interpretation of archaeological evidence.

Anthr 431. Ethnographic Field School. (Dual-listed with 531). Cr. 4-6. SS.4 or 6 weeks. Summer field school for training in ethnographic field methods; students will carry out research projects in social anthropology, learning a variety of investigative research techniques commonly used in social sciences.

Anthr 432. Current Issues in Native North America. (Dual-listed with 532). (Cross-listed with Am In). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 201 or 306; 322 or Am In 210 recommended. Conditions and issues of contemporary Native Americans; historical background of eighteenth and nineteenth century Indian-White relationships; examination of legal status, the reservation system, treaty violations, Indian militancy, education and urbanization, self-determination, social impact of resource development, and other current concerns.

Anthr 434. Internship. Cr. 2-6. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Junior or senior standing. Supervised practice in government agencies, museums, and business organizations. Not more than 6 credits of internship experience may count towards the major. No credits in Anthr 434 may be used to satisfy Anthropology core courses for majors or for the Anthropology minor. Satisfactory-fail only.
A. Archaeology
B. Cultural Anthropology
C. Biological Anthropology
D. Linguistic Anthropology

Anthr 436. Development Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 536). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Anthr 201 or 306. Historical and theoretical basis of the practices of development, applied and economic anthropology. Covers a wide range of topics such as the role of aid, institutions of development, indigenous knowledge, rural development projects, organization of production, migration, health and environment.

Anthr 438. Primate Evolutionary Ecology and Behavior. (Dual-listed with 538). Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 202 or 307. Primate behavior and ecology in evolutionary perspective: biological and social adaptations of prosimians, monkeys, and apes. Introduction to the Order Primates, basic evolutionary concepts, and techniques of behavioral observation. Focus on theory and methods current in Primatology, including applied conservation biology.

Anthr 439. Medical Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 539). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 201 or 202 or 306. Study of human health in cultural and environmental context; comparison of health and disease patterns of western and non-western populations; healing systems; use of epidemiological models in understanding illness and disease etiologies cross-culturally; interrelationship between diet and culture.

Anthr 444. Sex and Gender in Cross-cultural Perspective. (Dual-listed with 544). (Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Anthr 201; Anthr 306 recommended. Cross-cultural examination of the social construction of genders out of the biological fact of sex. Emphasis on non-western societies. Topics, presented through examination of ethnographic data, will include the range of gender variation, status and roles, the institution of marriage, and symbols of gender valuation.

Anthr 445. Biological Field School. (Dual-listed with 545). Cr. 4-6. SS.Prereq: 202 or Biol 101. Summer field school for training in behavioral and ecological methods for primatologists. Proposal, data collection and analyses, and presentation of research topic in primatology.

Anthr 450. Historical and Theoretical Approaches in Anthropology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 306. Survey of the historical foundations of anthropology and its interrelated four sub-fields; key figures in 19th and 20th century anthropology with a focus on major theoretical contributions.

Anthr 451. Practicum in Anthropology. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: 201 or 202 or 308. Application of methods under actual laboratory and field conditions, including basic data management, synthesis, and analysis.
A. Archaeology
B. Cultural Anthropology
C. Biological Anthropology
D. Linguistic Anthropology

Anthr 482. Topics in Biological Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 582). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.Prereq: Anthr 307. In-depth study of current topics in biological anthropology, such as new fossil specimens, research on the evolution of cognition, the emergence of applied primatology, and the dynamic field of population genetics as each relates to the Order Primates.
A. Paleoanthropology
B. Primate Cognition
C. Population Conservation
D. Population Genetics and Human Evolution

Anthr 490. Independent Study. Cr. 1-5. Repeatable.Prereq: 9 credits in anthropology. No more than 9 credits of Anthr 490 may be counted toward graduation.
A. Archaeology
B. Cultural Anthropology
C. Biological Anthropology
D. Linguistic Anthropology (Same as Ling 490D)
H. Honors
I. Undergraduate Independent Study (Same as Ia LL 490I)

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

Anthr 500. Language and Culture. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Anthr 309 or 510. Approaches to the study of the relationship between language structure, world view, and cognition; social and structural linguistic variation; cross-cultural aspects of verbal and non-verbal communication; linguistic change; contemporary applications of linguistic anthropology.

Anthr 503. Biological Anthropology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 307. Survey of the history of biological anthropology, current developments and theoretical issues in evolution, human variation and adaptation, population studies, primates and primate behavior, and paleoanthropology.

Anthr 509. Agroecosystems Analysis. (Cross-listed with Agron, Soc, SusAg). (3-4) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Senior or above classification. Experiential, interdisciplinary examination of Midwestern agricultural and food systems, emphasizing field visits, with some classroom activities. Focus on understanding multiple elements, perspectives (agronomic, economic, ecologic, social, etc.) and scales of operation.

Anthr 510. Theoretical Dimensions of Cultural Anthropology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 6 credits in anthropology. Survey of historical and current developments in topical and theoretical approaches to sociocultural anthropology. Examination and assessment of controversies; new research directions and theoretical approaches.

Anthr 511. Culture Change and Applied Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 411). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 6 credits in anthropology, 201 or 306. Theoretical and practical considerations of cultural development. Examination of theories, cultural change, culture contact and acculturation. Dynamics of directed change in contemporary world cultures. Principles, theories, and ethics of international development projects from a sociocultural perspective.

Anthr 512. Psychological Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 412). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 201 or 306. Relationship of cultural, social and personality factors in human behavior. Cross-cultural comparisons of child rearing practices, cognitive development, mental health, deviancy, ethno-psychiatry, altered states of consciousness, and psychological dimensions of culture change.

Anthr 513. The Family and Kinship in Cross-Cultural Perspective. (Dual-listed with 313). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 6 credits in anthropology, 201 recommended. Comparative and historical overview of family, marriage and kinship crossculturally; discussion of differences in the structure, cycle, and functioning of family and kin relations through ethnographic readings, including Euro-American examples; current critical and theoretical issues in kinship studies, especially integrating work on gender, sexuality and representation.

Anthr 514. Southwestern Archaeology. (Dual-listed with 414). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 308 or 315 or 321. Prehistoric archaeology of the American Southwest, including the Paleo-indian and Archaic periods; the adoption of agriculture; the emergence of pueblo societies; relationships with contemporary Southwest cultures.

Anthr 515. Archaeology of North America. (Dual-listed with 315). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 202 or 308. Prehistory and early history of North America as reconstructed from archaeological evidence; peopling of the New World; culture-historical sequences of major culture areas; linkages of archaeological traditions with selected ethnohistorically known Native American groups.

Anthr 518. Global Culture, Consumption and Modernity. (Dual-listed with 418). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Anthr 201 or 306 recommended. Cross-cultural study of the impact of globalization, with an emphasis on economic consumption and the movement of goods, ideas, and peoples across cultural and national boundaries.

Anthr 519. Skeletal Biology. (Dual-listed with 319). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 307 or college level biology recommended. Comprehensive study of the skeletal anatomy, physiology, genetics, growth, development and population variation of the human skeleton. Applications to forensic anthropology, paeopathology, and bioarchaeology are introduced.

Anthr 520. Cultural Continuity and Change in the Prairie-Plains. (Dual-listed with 420). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 315 or 322. Ecological adaptations, sociocultural changes, and continuities of traditions among Prairie and Plains Indian groups through time; impacts of Euro-American society and technology on Indians of the Great Plains; perspectives from ecology, archaeology, ethnology, history, and contemporary literary sources.

Anthr 521. World Prehistory. (Dual-listed with 321). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 202 recommended. An introduction to archaeological sites from around the world including the Near East, Africa, Europe, Mesoamerica, and North and South America. Emphasis is on the interpretation of material cultural remains in reconstructing past societies.

Anthr 522. Peoples and Cultures of Native North America. (Dual-listed with 322). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 201 or Am In 210. Origin, distribution, and traditional life of native peoples of North America. Survey of culture areas; ecology and subsistence, language, kinship, life cycle; political, economic and religious systems; impact of European contact.

Anthr 523. Topics in Latin American Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 323). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. S.Prereq: 6 credits in anthropology, 201 or 306 recommended. Exploration of contemporary Latin American social dynamics within specific historical, political and economic contexts; discussion of current ethnographic approaches to studying key sociocultural issues in Latin America. Topics vary each time offered.
A. Violence and Memory
B. Social Movements and Democracy
C. Race, Class and Gender
D. Regional Focus

Anthr 524. Forensic Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 424). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 319. Comprehensive study of forensic anthropology, a specialized subfield of biological anthropology. Emphasis is placed on personal identifications from extremely fragmentary, comingled, burnt, cremated and incomplete skeletal remains. All parameters of forensic study are included as they pertain to anthropology, including human variation, taphonomy, entomology archaeology, pathology, epidemiology; genetics and the non-biological forensic disciplines. An appreciation for the wide range of medicolegal and bioethical issues will also be gained.

Anthr 525. Peoples and Cultures of Africa. (Dual-listed with 325). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 201 or 306 recommended. Origins and distribution of peoples of Africa; geographical characteristics as related to culture types, including early civilizations; a comparative examination of economic, subsistence, language, social and political organization, and religious systems throughout the continent; change processes, the impact of colonialism, and the nature of contemporary African societies.

Anthr 528. Topics in Archaeological Laboratory Methods and Techniques. (Dual-listed with 428). (2-2) Cr. 3. Repeatable. S.Prereq: 308. Laboratory processing, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological materials such as lithics, ceramics, and faunal remains. Laboratory sessions emphasize analytical techniques including classification, data acquisition organization, and computer applications
A. Lithics
B. Ceramics
C. Faunal remains
D. General.

Anthr 529. Archaeological Field School. (Dual-listed with 429). Cr. 4-6. SS.Prereq: 202 or 308. Summer field school for training in archaeological reconnaissance and excavation techniques; documentation and interpretation of archaeological evidence.

Anthr 530. Ethnographic Field Methods. Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 6 credits in anthropology, permission of instructor. Field training experience in ethnography. Problems emphasizing field studies in the contemporary societies of the world. Focus on techniques of data gathering and analysis.

Anthr 531. Ethnographic Field School. (Dual-listed with 431). Cr. 4-6. SS.4 or 6 weeks. Summer field school for training in ethnographic field methods; students will carry out research projects in social anthropology, learning a variety of investigative research techniques commonly used in social sciences.

Anthr 532. Current Issues in Native North America. (Dual-listed with 432). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 6 credits in anthropology, 201 or 306; 322 or Am In 210 recommended. Conditions and issues of contemporary Native Americans; historical background of eighteenth and nineteenth century Indian-White relationships; examination of legal status, the reservation system, treaty violations, Indian militancy, education and urbanization, self-determination, social impact of resource development, and other current concerns.

Anthr 535. Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East. (Dual-listed with 335). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 201 or 306 recommended. Anthropological approaches to the study of Middle East cultures. Survey of major culture areas. Discussion of economic, political, and social and religious issues and systems. Examination of contemporary social movements.

Anthr 536. Development Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 436). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Anthr 201 or 306. Historical and theoretical basis of the practices of development, applied and economic anthropology. Covers a wide range of topics such as the role of aid, institutions of development, indigenous knowledge, rural development projects, organization of production, migration, health and environment.

Anthr 537. Andean Archaeology. (Dual-listed with 337). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 202 or 321 recommended. Survey of prehistoric Andean cultures of Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador; the archaeology of the Incas and their ancestors. Emphasis on prehistoric economics, religious, and political organization, the rich material culture recovered through archaeological records; and the use of ethnohistoric texts and modern ethnographies to reconstruct the prehistory of Andean societies.

Anthr 538. Primate Evolutionary Ecology and Behavior. (Dual-listed with 438). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 202 or 307. Primate behavior and ecology in evolutionary perspective; biological and social adaptations of prosimians, monkeys, and apes. Introduction to the Order Primates, basic evolutionary concepts, and techniques of behavioral observation. Focus on theory and methods current in Primatology, including applied conservation biology.

Anthr 539. Medical Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 439). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 6 credits in anthropology, 201 or 202 or 306 recommended. Study of human health in cultural and environmental context; comparison of health and disease patterns of western and non-western populations; healing systems; use of epidemiological models in understanding illness and disease etiologies cross-culturally; interrelationship between diet and culture.

Anthr 540. Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion. (Dual-listed with 340). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 6 credits in anthropology, 201 or 306 recommended. Origin and development of indigenous magico-religious systems; myth and ritual; therapeutic aspects; symbols and meanings; religion and socio-cultural change, including acculturation, nativistic, and revitalization movements.

Anthr 544. Sex and Gender in Cross-cultural Perspective. (Dual-listed with 444). (Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 201; 306 recommended. Cross-cultural examination of the social construction of genders out of the biological fact of sex. Emphasis on non-western societies. Topics, presented through examination of ethnographic data, will include the range of gender variation, status and roles, the institution of marriage, and symbols of gender valuation.

Anthr 545. Biological Field School. (Dual-listed with 445). Cr. 4-6. SS.Prereq: Anthr 202 or Biol 101 and permission of instructor. Summer field school for training in behavioral and ecological methods for primatologists. Proposal, data collection and analyses, and presentation of research topic in primatology.

Anthr 550. Primate Behavior. (Dual-listed with 350). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.Prereq: Anthr 202 and/or basic biology course recommended.. An introduction to the Order Primates with a focus on their behavior. Biological and social adaptations of monkeys, apes, and prosimians; basic evolutionary concepts, current trends and theories in the field of Primatology and issues related to primate conservation.

Anthr 555. Seminar in Archaeology. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 308 or 429. Examination of the history of anthropological archaeology and current issues and debates concerning methods, theories and the ethics of modern archaeology.

Anthr 582. Topics in Biological Anthropology. (Dual-listed with 482). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.Prereq: Anthr 307. In-depth study of current topics in biological anthropology, such as new fossil specimens, research on the evolution of cognition, the emergence of applied primatology, and the dynamic field of population genetics as each relates to the Order Primates.
A. Paleoanthropology
B. Primate Cognition
C. Population Conservation
D. Population Genetics and Human Evolution

Anthr 590. Graduate Independent Study. (Cross-listed with Ia LL, A Ecl, EEOB). Cr. 1-4. Repeatable. SS.Prereq: Graduate classification and permission of instructor.
I. Iowa Lakeside Laboratory (Same as Ia LL 590I)

Anthr 591. Orientation to Anthropology. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.Prereq: Admission to the Anthropology Graduate Program. Introduction to the Anthropology program, including the requirements for successful degree completion, department administrative procedures, ethics in anthropology and current trends in the four subfields of anthropology. Required of graduate students. Satisfactory-fail only.

Courses for graduate students

Anthr 610. Foundations of Sustainable Agriculture. (Cross-listed with Agron, SusAg, Soc, A E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Graduate classification, permission of instructor. Historical, biophysical, socioeconomic, and ethical dimensions of agricultural sustainability. Strategies for evaluating existing and emerging systems of agriculture in terms of core concepts of sustainability and their theoretical contexts.

Anthr 699. Research. Cr. arr. Repeatable.
I. Iowa Lakeside Laboratory (Same as Ia LL 699I.)