Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2009-2011 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

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Animal Science

100 |200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses |500 |600 |

www.ans.iastate.edu/

Maynard Hogberg, Chair of Department
Distinguished Professors: Anderson, Beitz, Lamont, Rothschild, Sebranek
Distinguished Professors (Emeritus): Freeman, Jacobson, Sell, Trenkle, Willham
University Professors: Kenealy
University Professors (Emeritus): Parrish
Professors: Ahn, Baas, Berger, Brant, Cordray, Dekkers, Dickson, Fernando, Garrick, Harris, Hoffman, Hogberg, Honeyman, Kilmer, E. Lonergan, S. Lonergan, Loy, Mabry, Morrical, Nissen, Olson, Prusa, Robson, Russell, Spike, M. Spurlock, Strohbehn, Tuggle, Xin
Professors (Emeritus): Brackelsberg, Ewan, Foreman, Haynes, Holden, Jurgens, Kiser, Marple, Owings, Rouse, Rust, Speer, Stevermer, Stromer, Topel, Voelker, Wickersham, Wilson, Wunder, Young, Zimmerman, Zmolek
Professors (Collaborators): Clutter, Horst, Kehrli, Nonnecke, Quigley, Reinhardt, Scanes
Associate Professors: Auwerda, Cunnick, Huiatt, Jeftinija, Patience, Reecy, Skaar, Spurlock, Stalder, Timms, Tyler, Youngs
Associate Professors (Collaborators): Frye, Gunsett, Kerr, Mahanna, Sosnicki
Assistant Professors: Butters-Johnson, Ellinwood, Gabler, Ross, Selsby
Assistant Professors (Collaborators): Bonner, Campbell, Lippolis, McVicker, Pita, Rathmacher
Senior Lecturer: Boury
Lecturers: Ferwerda, Olsen, Thayne
Clinician: Leuschen

Undergraduate Study

The Department of Animal Science Undergraduate Program intends for its graduates to be able to detail the symbiotic relationship of animals and humans, to solve the complex problems of animal enterprise management, and to apply their knowledge and skills in a technically demanding global community. To enable learners to pursue a wide array of career interests, the department offers learning experiences ranging from the basic to the applied sciences. The department's undergraduate degree program has 10 major program goals. They are to provide a comprehensive animal science education in (1) science, (2) animal management, and (3) agri-business. In addition, our program strives to create an environment developing: (4) effective communication skills, (5) skills enabling students to gather and integrate information to solve problems, (6) self learners, (7) leaders and team builders, and (8) awareness of domestic and global issues driving changes in the animal industries. Our program also works to (9) provide career skills appropriate to job market needs, and (10) provide superior counseling for fulfilling individual student objectives.

Learner outcomes for each of these goals, for each of our courses, and other information defining the program can be found at our web site: www.ans.iastate.edu/ .

The department offers the degrees bachelor of science in animal science and bachelor of science in dairy science, as well as complementary work toward admission to schools of law, medicine, and veterinary medicine which may be done while satisfying requirements for the degree bachelor of science degree (see Index). A minimum of 15 credits of animal science coursework must be earned at Iowa State University. A combined bachelor of science and master of science in animal science is also offered.

The department offers a minor in Animal Science. The minor requires: 101, 114, 214, 214L, one course from: 216, 223, 224, 225, 226, 229, 235, 270, two courses from: 319, 331, 352, 360. A total of 9 credits must be earned at Iowa State University in animal science coursework that meets a degree requirement for the B.S. degree in animal science. Students interested in the Animal Science minor should contact an Animal Science advisor.

The department offers a minor in Meat Science. The minor requires: 270, 360, 460; one course from: 489, 490C, six credits from: FS HN 311, 403, 405, 406, 410, 412, 419, 420, 471, Micro 407. Students majoring in Animal Science will NOT be allowed to count the 9 required credits (270, 360, 460) toward their Animal Science degree. Students interested in the Meat Science minor should contact an Animal Science advisor.

Graduate Study

The department offers work for the degrees master of science and doctor of philosophy with majors in animal breeding and genetics; animal nutrition; meat science; animal physiology; and animal science. Minor work is offered in these areas to students taking major work in other departments.

A strong undergraduate program is required for students interested in graduate study. Fundamental training in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and statistics is requisite to a satisfactory graduate program. Graduate programs in animal science include supporting work in areas such as agronomy; anatomy; microbiology; biochemistry; chemistry; economics; food science and human nutrition; genetics; physics; physiology; and statistics. Students may choose graduate programs involving a co-major with one of these areas. Graduate work in meat science is offered as a co-major in animal science and food science and human nutrition.

The department also cooperates in the interdepartmental program in professional agriculture and interdepartmental majors in genetics, immunobiology, MCDB (molecular, cellular, and developmental biology), nutritional sciences, and toxicology (see Index).

The foreign language requirement, if any, is established on an individual basis by the program-of-study committee appointed to guide the work of the student.

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

An S 101. Working with Animals. (1-3) Cr. 2. F.S.A hands-on introductory course in skills for proper care and management of domestic animals. Husbandry skills including health observation, animal movement, identification, management procedures, and environmental assessment are covered.

An S 110. Orientation in Animal Science and ISU. Cr. R. F.S.Orientation to the university and Department of Animal Science. Challenges and opportunities available to the professional animal agriculturalist. Professional goal setting, portfolio development, and development of interpersonal skills in the context of pursuing a career in animal science.

An S 114. Survey of the Animal Industry. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S.SS.Ways domestic animals serve the basic needs of humans for food, shelter, protection, fuel, and emotional well-being. Terminology, basic structures of the industries surrounding the production, care, and marketing of domestic animals in the U.S.

An S 115. Horsemanship and Equitation. (0-4) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.An S 115 can be taken for a maximum of three times for credit. Satisfactory-fail only.
A. Beginner Hunt Seat Equitation.
B. Beginner Jumping. Prereq: 115C, or able to walk, trot, and canter.
C. Intermediate Hunt Seat Equitation. Prereq: 115A or be able to walk, trot, and canter.
D. Intermediate Jumping. Prereq: 115C or jumped a course up to 18".
E. Beginner Western Horsemanship.
F. Intermediate Western Horsemanship. Prereq: 115 E or able to walk, jog and lope.

An S 211. Issues Facing Animal Science. (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.Prereq: 114, sophomore classification. Overview of the factors that define contemporary ethical and scientifically based issues facing animal agriculture. Life skill development (including interactive skills, communication ability, organization, information gathering, and leadership skills) emphasized in the context of issues study. Satisfactory-fail only.

An S 214. Domestic Animal Physiology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: Biol 212, Chem 163 or 177. Introduction to anatomy and physiology of the neural, circulatory, respiratory, immune, endocrine, reproductive, and digestive systems of domestic animals.

An S 214L. Domestic Animal Anatomy and Physiology Lab. (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in An S 214. Basic anatomy of domestic animals.

An S 216. Equine Science. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 101 or 114; one course in biology. Introduction to contemporary concepts, and basic practices and decisions necessary when managing horses through stages of their lives.

An S 217. Equine Farm Practicum. (2-2) Cr. 2. F.Prereq: Student majoring in Animal Science, An S 115 or riding experience, An S 216 or concurrent. Intensified management of the equine farm. Provide students with experiential learning in all phases of horse production and management. Students assist with general farm management, preparing horses for sale, marketing techniques and web design.

An S 223. Poultry Science. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: 101, 114. Introduction to principles, practices and decisions necessary when raising poultry through their production cycle.

An S 224. Companion Animal Science. (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Course in biology. Introduction of students to contemporary concepts, and basic practices and decisions necessary when caring for the companion animal through stages of its life.

An S 225. Swine Science. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: 101, 114. Introduction to principles, practices and decisions necessary when raising swine through the vertically integrated production cycle.

An S 226. Beef Cattle Science. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: 101, 114. Introduction to principles, practices and decisions necessary when raising beef cattle through the vertically integrated production cycle.

An S 229. Sheep Science. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: 101, 114. Introduction to principles, practices and decisions necessary when raising sheep through the vertically integrated production cycle.

An S 235. Dairy Cattle Science. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 101, 114. Introduction to principles, practices and decisions necessary when raising dairy cattle through the vertically integrated production cycle.

An S 270. Foods of Animal Origin. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Biol 212, Chem 163 or 177. Principles, practices and issues impacting the production, processing and preservation of safe, wholesome, nutritious, and palatable meat, dairy, and egg products. Product evaluation, classification, value, and utilization.

An S 305. Livestock Evaluation. (0-6) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Junior classification; An S 270 recommended. Fall semester leads to 475A or D. Breeding animal and market animal evaluation of beef, swine and sheep using contemporary techniques and tools. Communication and decision-making skills are practiced in the context of making selection decisions.

An S 306. Equine Evaluation. (0-6) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: sophomore classification or permission of instructor. Detailed visual evaluation of conformation and performance of the equine athlete. Decision-making skills are practiced in the context of making selection choices. Development of written and oral communication skills as students defend their judgments. Industry trends will be addressed.

An S 311. Career Preparation in Animal Science. (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.Prereq: Junior classification in An S. Life skill development emphasized in the context of career preparation. Assist students with career goal clarification, interview skills, résumé preparation. Internship development, job shadowing, and exploration of career option. Satisfactory-fail only.

An S 316. Training the Horse. (0-6) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 115, or ability to walk, trot and canter. Modifying the behavior of the horse for performance objectives through bitting, longeing, saddling, and riding.

An S 319. Animal Nutrition. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.Prereq: 214, course in organic chemistry or biochemistry. Fundamentals of nutrition. Essential nutritive requirements of domestic animals, sources of nutrients, composition and identification of feeds, diet formulation and feeding recommendations. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 320. Livestock Feeding Program Design. (0-4) Cr. 2. F.S.Prereq: 319. Advanced diet formulation and feeding recommendations. Evaluation of alternate feeding programs and diets in the context of case studies.

An S 325. Biorenewable Systems. (Cross-listed with A E, Agron, BusAd, Econ, TSM). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Econ 101, Chem 155 or higher, Math 140 or higher. Converting biorenewable resources into bioenergy and biobased products. Biorenewable concepts as they relate to drivers of change, feedstock production, processes, products, co-products, economics, transportation/logistics, and marketing.

An S 331. Domestic Animal Reproduction. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: Course in physiology. Comparative anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology of domestic mammalian animal reproduction. Techniques for the control and manipulation of reproductive processes. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 332. Laboratory Methods in Animal Reproduction. (0-4) Cr. 2. F.S.Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 331. Comparative reproductive anatomy with emphasis on the physiology of normal reproductive function; ways to control and improve reproduction; principles of artificial insemination in farm animals; and selected laboratory exercises with written report.

An S 333. Embryo Transfer and Related Technologies. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S.Prereq: 331 or 332. Application of embryo transfer and related technologies to genetic improvement of mammalian livestock. Techniques for control of female reproduction, embryo collection and transfer, embryo cryopreservation, and embryo manipulation. Gender selection. Economic and genetic aspects of embryo transfer. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 334. Embryo Transfer Laboratory. (0-3) Cr. 1. F.Prereq: Credit or concurrent enrollment in An S 333; An S 332 or VDPAM 416; permission of instructor. Selected laboratory exercises related to embryo transfer such as synchronization of estrus, superovulation, detection of estrus, artificial insemination, embryo collection, embryo evaluation, microscopy, embryo cryopreservation, in vitro fertilization, and embryo sexing will be demonstrated and/or performed. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 335. Dairy Cattle Evaluation. (0-6) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Sophomore classification. Evaluation of breeding animals for dairy herds. Comparative terminology, decision making, and presentation of oral reasons. Trips to dairy cattle farms. Livestock handling.

An S 336. Domestic Animal Behavior and Well-Being. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: One course in physiology. Principles of behavior relative to animal care, management and environmental design to ensure animal well-being. Examination of basic neural-endocrine mechanisms involved in the animal's response to its environment. Awareness of animal protection, law and legislation. Methods to objectively assess animal well-being.

An S 337. Lactation. (2-0) Cr. 2. S.Prereq: 214. The structure, development and evolution of the mammary gland. Mammary metabolism, milk synthesis; neural and endocrine regulation of mammary function. Immune function and health of the mammary gland.

An S 345. Growth and Development of Domestic Animals. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: An S 214; Biol 313 or Gen 320. Basic principles of animal growth and development covered at the tissue, cellular and molecular level. Emphasis placed on skeletal muscle, adipose, bone, and immune system growth and development. The effects of genetics, nutrition, and pharmaceuticals on growth.

An S 352. Genetic Improvement of Domestic Animals. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: One course in statistics, Biol 211, course in genetics. Principles of qualitative and quantitative genetics applied to creating change in domestic animals. Impact of selection and mating schemes in achieving breeding program goals. Applications and impacts of biotechnological advancements in genetic manipulation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 353. Animal Breeding Programs Design. (0-4) Cr. 2. S.Prereq: 352. Evaluation of alternate breeding programs and genetic improvement techniques in the context of case study. Experiential and cooperative learning techniques employed. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 360. Fresh Meats. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 270; a course in organic or biochemistry. Impact of muscle structure, composition, rigor mortis, inspection, fabrication, handling, packaging and cooking on the palatability, nutritional value, yields, market value, and safety of fresh meat. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 399. Animal Science Internship. Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.SS.
A. Graded Internship Experience. Cr. 2 to 6. Prereq: Permission of the instructor. Learning experience focused on professional development for a career related to animal science. Journal, presentation, and creative component.
B. Supervised Internship Experience. Cr.
R. Prereq: Permission of internship coordinator. Supervised learning activity consisting of work period in production agriculture or the agriculture-related industry.

An S 411. Addressing Issues in Animal Science. (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.Prereq: Senior classification in An S. Life skill development emphasized in the context of exploring one's perspective of the most pressing moral and scientific issues facing animal agriculture. Clarification and communication of personal conclusions in small and large group settings expected.

An S 415. Equine Systems Management. (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 216, 319, 331. Application of advanced horse management - nutrition, reproduction, exercise physiology and business. Computer-aided management. Explore topics of current concern in the horse industry. Computer aided study. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 417. Equine Reproductive Management. (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 216, 331, 415 or concurrent and permission of instructor. Practical application of managing a breeding farm including servicing the mare, handling stallions, breeding problems, foaling mares, and marketing techniques.

An S 419. Advanced Animal Nutrition. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.Prereq: 214, 319. Detailed consideration of digestion, metabolism, and assimilation of nutrients. Recent advances and developments in basic nutrition. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 423. Poultry Systems Management. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 223, 319, 331, 352. Decisions facing the administrator of a poultry enterprise. Financial and production goal identification, problem clarification, and resource allocation to manage the poultry enterprise. Computer aided study. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 424. Companion Animal Systems Management. (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 224, 319, 331, 352. Decisions facing the administrator of a companion animal enterprise. Financial and business goal identification, problem clarification, and resource allocation to manage the companion animal system. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 425. Swine Systems Management. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: 225, 270, 319, 331, 352; Econ 330 or equivalent recommended. Decisions facing the administrator of a swine enterprise. Financial and production goal identification, problem clarification, and resource allocation to manage the swine enterprise. Computer aided study. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 426. Beef Cattle Systems Management. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: 226, 270, 319, 331, 352; Econ 330 or equivalent recommended. Decisions facing the administrator of a beef cow-calf or feedlot enterprise. Financial and production goal identification, problem clarification, and resource allocation to manage the beef enterprise. Computer aided study. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 429. Sheep Systems Management. (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 229, 319, 331, 352; Agron 334 recommended; Econ 330 or equivalent recommended. Decisions facing the administrator of a sheep enterprise. Financial and production goal identification, problem clarification, and resource allocation to manage the sheep enterprise. Computer aided study. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 434. Dairy Systems Management. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.Prereq: 235, 319, 331, 337, 352; Econ 330 or equivalent recommended. Decisions facing the administrator of a dairy enterprise. Financial and production goal identification, problem clarification, and resource allocation to manage the dairy enterprise. Computer aided study. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 435. Applied Dairy Farm Evaluation. (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: An S 434; Econ 330. Evaluate nutrition, reproduction, milk quality, breeding, and related management practices of commercial dairy herds in a case study format. Students will apply knowledge gained in the classroom to commercial dairy farm situations and develop skills in information gathering, decision making, problem solving, and interpersonal communications. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 460. Processed Meats. (Dual-listed with 560). (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 270. Physical, chemical and biological properties of meat important to processed meat product characteristics. Ingredients, technology and equipment used for cured meats, loaf products and fresh, cooked, dry and semi-dry sausages products. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 475. Intercollegiate Judging Training and Competition. (0-4) Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. F.S.Prereq: permission of instructor. Specialized training in evaluation and grading of livestock, livestock products, and livestock production management plans. Maximum of 6 credits may be applied toward graduation.
A. Meat Animals
B. Dairy Cattle
C. Meats
D. Meat Animal Evaluation.
E. Horses
F. Management Systems

An S 480. Animal Industry Leadership Fellows. Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.Prereq: A. An S 226; permission of instructor C. An S 225; permission of instructor. Students broaden their perspective of the livestock industry through site visits, case-study (Fellows) projects, and cooperative learning experiences that capitalize on interaction skills in the context of studying the structure of the U.S. livestock industry. This for-credit offering represents the central academic focus of the Iowa State University Animal Industry Leadership Fellows Program. Study is species specific, and enrollment is limited. Satisfactory-fail only.
A. Beef
C. Pork

An S 489. Issues in Food Safety. (Cross-listed with FS HN, HRI, VDPAM). (1-0) Cr. 1. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: Credit or enrollment in FS HN 101 or 272 or HRI 233; FS HN 419 or 420; FS HN 403. Capstone seminar for the food safety minor. Case discussions and independent projects about safety issues in the food system from a multidisciplinary perspective.

An S 490. Independent Study. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors in animal science and dairy science showing satisfactory preparation for problems chosen. Individual topic conference and preparation of report. A maximum of 6 credits of An S 490 may be applied toward the total credits required for graduation.
A. Animal Science
B. Dairy Science
C. Meat Science
D. Companion Animal Science
E. Equine Science
G. Poultry Science
H. Honors
I. Entrepreneurship

An S 493. Workshop in Animal Science. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable.Prereq: Permission of instructor. Workshop in livestock production. Includes current concepts in breeding, nutrition, reproduction, meats, and technologies that impact the animal industry. Nonmajor graduate credit.

An S 495. Agricultural Travel Course Preparation. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.Prereq: Permission of instructor. Limited enrollment. Students enrolled in this course will also register for Agron 495 and intend to register in Agron 496 and An S 496 the following term. Topics will include the agricultural industries, climate, crops, culture, history, livestock, marketing, soils, and preparation for travel to locations to be visited. Information normally available 9 months before departure.

An S 496. Agricultural Travel Course. Cr. arr. Repeatable.Prereq: Permission of instructor, 30 college credits. Limited enrollment. Students enroll in both An S 496 and Agron 496. Tour and study of production methods in major crop and livestock regions of the world. Influence of climate, economics, geography, soils, landscapes, markets, and other factors on livestock and crop production. Locations and duration of tours will vary. Summer tour will usually visit a northern location and winter tour will usually visit a southern location. Information usually available 9 months before departure. Tour expenses paid by students.
A. International tour
B. Domestic tour

An S 497. Undergraduate Teaching Experiences in Animal Science. Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Permission of instructor. Development of oral and written communication skills of technical concepts in animal science. Emphasis on organizational skills, conducting activities and interpersonal communication skills. Responsibilities in a class under direct supervision of a faculty member. A maximum of 4 credits of An S 497 may be applied toward graduation.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

An S 500. Computer Techniques for Biological Research. (2-0) Cr. 1. F.Introduction to UNIX and SAS for solving research problems, including organization of data files, transfer of files between workstations, developing models, and techniques for analysis of designed experiments. Introduction to matrix algebra for solving animal breeding problems using MATLAB and computer simulation.
A. (1st half of semester)UNIX and SAS
B. (2nd half of semester) Problem solving using matrix algebra

An S 501. Survey of Animal Disciplines. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.Required for Animal Science graduate students. Orientation to departmental and graduate school policies and procedures. Discussion of programs of research and outreach in Animal Science. Issues impacting the animal industry. Satisfactory-fail only.

An S 503. Seminar in Animal Production. (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.Prereq: Permission of instructor. Discussion and evaluation of current topics in animal production and management.

An S 511. Applied Ruminant Nutrition. (2-0) Cr. 2.Prereq: 319. Procedures and theories in beef, dairy, and sheep nutrition. Feeding programs and requirements for lactation, growth, and reproduction. Designed for master of agriculture program.

An S 515. Integrated Crop and Livestock Production Systems. (Cross-listed with A E, Agron, SusAg). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: SusAg 509. Methods to maintain productivity and minimize the negative ecological effects of agricultural systems by understanding nutrient cycles, managing manure and crop residue, and utilizing multispecies interactions. Crop and livestock production within landscapes and watersheds is also considered. Course includes a significant field component, with student teams analyzing Iowa farms.

An S 518. Digestive Physiology and Metabolism of Non Ruminants. (Cross-listed with NutrS). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: An S 419 or NutrS 501. Digestion and metabolism of nutrients. Nutritional requirements and current research and feeding programs for poultry and swine.

An S 520. Digestive Physiology and Metabolism of Ruminants. (Cross-listed with NutrS). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: An S 419 or NutrS 501. Digestive physiology and nutrient metabolism in ruminant and preruminant animals.

An S 533. Physiology and Endocrinology of Animal Reproduction. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: General physiology course. Development of structure and function of the reproductive system. Physiologic and endocrine aspects including puberty, gametogenesis, estrous cycle, pregnancy, parturition, interaction of environment, thyroid and adrenal function, and nutrition with these processes.

An S 536. Perinatology. (2-0) Cr. 2. S.Prereq: One course in physiology; one course in biochemistry. Regulation of metabolism and development in the mammalian fetus and neonate is explored in a comparative manner. Emphasis will be on the dynamic changes in these relationships occurring at birth.

An S 537. Topics in Farm Animal Environmental Physiology, Behavior, Stress, and Welfare. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S.Prereq: permission of instructor; M.S. or Ph.D. student. Each semester students focus on different topics related to farm animal environmental physiology, behavior, stress, and welfare. Each topic is separate and distinct, and students may enroll in multiple topics. This is an on-line cooperative course involving instructors at Iowa State University, Texas Tech University, and the University of Illinois. Each topic may be taken only one time.
A. Animal rights and philosophies
B. Brain mechanisms of stress
C. Measuring behavior and welfare
D. Environmental stressors
E. Stress and the immune system
F. Other related topics

An S 540. Livestock Immunogenetics. (Cross-listed with Micro, V MPM). (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: An S 561 or Micro 575 or V MPM 520. Basic concepts and contemporary topics in genetic regulation of livestock immune response and disease resistance.

An S 549. Advanced Vertebrate Physiology I. (Cross-listed with B M S, Kin). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Biol 335; credit or enrollment in BBMB 404 or 420. Neurophysiology, sensory systems, muscle, neuroendocrinology, endocrinology.

An S 552. Advanced Vertebrate Physiology II. (Cross-listed with B M S, Kin, NutrS). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Biol 335; credit or enrollment in BBMB 404 or 420. Cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, and digestive physiology.

An S 552L. Advanced Vertebrate Physiology Laboratory. (Cross-listed with An ). (0-3) Cr. 1.Prereq: Credit or enrollment in B M S 552. Laboratory for cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, and digestive physiology.

An S 556. Current Topics in Genome Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: BBMB 405 or GDCB 510. Introduction to principles and methodology of molecular genetics useful in analyzing and modifying large genomes. Survey of statistical methods and computer programs for bioinformatics, linkage mapping, radiation hybrid mapping, and mapping quantitative trait loci.

An S 560. Processed Meats. (Dual-listed with 460). (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 270. Physical, chemical and biological properties of meat important to processed meat product characteristics. Ingredients, technology and equipment used for cured meats, loaf products and fresh, cooked, dry and semi-dry sausage products.

An S 561. Population and Quantitative Genetics for Breeding. (Cross-listed with Agron). (4-0) Cr. 4. F.Prereq: Stat 401. Population and quantitative genetics for plant and animal genetics. Study of the genetic basis and analysis of variation in quantitative traits in domestic or experimental populations using phenotypic and molecular marker data, including estimation of heritability and other genetic parameters, linkage analysis and mapping of quantitative trait loci, and the impact of inbreeding, heterosis, and genotype-by-environment interaction.

An S 562. Methodologies for Population/Quantitative Genetics. (2-0) Cr. 2. S.Prereq: 561, Stat 402. Basic theory for genetic analysis of animal breeding data. Course A (1st half semester) covers linear models, selection index methods, and basic theory for best linear unbiased prediction. Course B (2nd half semester) best linear unbiased prediction, including genetic groups, environmental adjustment, repeated records, multiple trait models, maternal effects models, and theory for maximum likelihood estimation of genetic parameters.
A. Linear Models and Genetic Prediction.
B. Advanced Genetic Prediction and Paramater Estimation.

An S 565. Professional Practice in the Life Sciences. (Cross-listed with Pl P, Agron, BCB, Hort, Micro, V MPM). Cr. arr. S.Prereq: Graduate classification. Professional discourse on the ethical and legal issues facing life science researchers. Offered in modular format; each module is four weeks.
A. Professional Practices in Research. (Cr. 1.0) Good scientific practices and professional ethics in the life sciences.
B. Intellectual Property and Industry Interactions. (Cr. 0.5) Ethical and legal issues facing life scientists involved in research interactions with industry.

An S 570. Advanced Meat Science and Applied Muscle Biology. (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 470. Ante and postmortem factors impacting composition, structure, and chemistry of red meat and poultry muscle/meat, the conversion of muscle to meat, and the sensory and nutritional attributes of fresh meats. Oral research reports and a research proposal.

An S 571. Advanced Meat Processing Principles and Technology. (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: An S 470 or 570. Physical/chemical relationships during processing. Effects of modern technology, non-meat additives and preservation techniques on quality and safety of processed meat. Laboratory demonstration of principles and technology.

An S 590. Special Topics. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Permission of instructor. Special topics in the animal sciences, offered on demand and may be conducted by guest professors.
A. Animal Breeding
B. Animal Nutrition
C. Meat Animal Production
D. Dairy Production
E. Meat Science
F. Physiology of Reproduction
G. Muscle Biology
H. Poultry Nutrition
I. Poultry Products
J. Experimental Surgery
K. Professional Topics
L. Teaching
M. Molecular Biology
N. Ethology

An S 599. Creative Component. Cr. 1-8. F.S.SS.Prereq: Nonthesis M.S. A written report based on research, library readings, or topics related to the student's area of specialization and approved by the student's advisory committee.
A. Animal Breeding and Genetics
B. Animal Nutrition
C. Animal Physiology
D. Animal Science
E. Meat Science

Courses for graduate students

An S 603. Seminar in Animal Nutrition. (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.Prereq: Permission of instructor. Discussion of current literature; preparation and submission of abstracts.

An S 619. Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism - Protein. (Cross-listed with NutrS). (2-0) Cr. 2. F.Prereq: BBMB 405. Digestion, absorption, and intermediary metabolism of amino acids and protein. Regulation of protein synthesis and degradation. Integration of cellular biochemistry and physiology of mammalian protein metabolism.

An S 620. Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism - Energy. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: BBMB 405. Energy constituents of feedstuffs and energy needs of animals as related to cellular biochemistry and physiology. Interpretations of classical and current research.

An S 633. Seminar in Animal Reproduction. (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.Prereq: Permission of instructor. Discussion of current literature and preparation of reports on selected topics concerning physiology of reproduction.

An S 652. Animal Breeding Strategies. (2-0) Cr. 2.Prereq: An S 561. Basic concepts and methods for design and evaluation of genetic improvement programs for livestock. Topic A. (1st half semester) Prediction of response to selection, selection index theory, multiple trait selection, inbreeding, crossbreeding, and marker-assisted selection. Topic B. (2nd half semester) Advanced concepts in design and evaluation of animal breeding programs, including modeling and optimization, derivation of economic values, gene-flow, and predicting rates of inbreeding. Each topic may be taken only one time for academic credit.
A. Breeding Goals and Response to Selection(S.)
B. Design and Evaluation of Animal Breeding Programs (Alt. S., offered 2011)

An S 653. Applied Animal Breeding Strategies. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.Prereq: 561 recommended. Industrial applications of breeding systems, selection methods, and new genetic technologies. One or more field trips to an industry breeding company to define a class project.
A. Swine and Poultry (Alt. F., offered 2010)
B. Beef and Dairy (Alt. F., offered 2009)

An S 655. Advanced Computational Methods in Animal Breeding and Genetics. (3-1) Cr. 2. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: 500, 562, Com S 207. Computational methods and strategies for analysis of large data sets with animal breeding data for use in research and industry applications. Course A (1st half semester) Strategies for handling large sets and for prediction using best linear unbiased prediction using a formal language and utility programs. Course B (2nd half semester) Strategies for estimation of genetic parameters and for use of non-linear models for genetic analysis of categorical and survival type data.
A. Computational Strategies for Predicting Breeding Values
B. Computational Strategies for Genetic Parameter Estimation

An S 656. Statistical Methods for Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 562, Stat 447. Statistical methods for mapping quantitative trait loci in out-bred populations. Methods based on modeling covariances between relatives. Likelihood based methods using half-sib and full-sib families and extended pedigrees. Bayesian methods applied.

An S 658. Seminar in Animal Breeding and Genetics. (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.Presentation of current research related to animal breeding and genetics.

An S 670. Molecular Biology of Muscle. (Cross-listed with BBMB). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: BBMB 405, 420, or 502. Ultrastructure of muscle; chemistry, structure, function, and molecular biology of muscle proteins. Molecular aspects of muscle contraction, development and turnover. Cytoskeletal proteins and dynamics.

An S 684. Seminar in Meat Science. (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. S.Prereq: Permission of instructor. Discussion and evaluation of current topics in research publications in meat science.

An S 685. Seminar in Muscle Biology. (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. S.Prereq: Permission of instructor. Reports and discussion of recent literature and current investigations.

An S 695. Seminar in Animal Science. (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. S.Reports and discussion of current issues and research in animal science. One credit is required for all M.S. degree candidates with graduate majors in the Department of Animal Science, and two credits are required for all Ph.D. candidates with graduate majors in the Department of Animal Science. Satisfactory-fail only.

An S 699. Research. Cr. arr. Repeatable.
A. Animal Breeding
B. Animal Nutrition
C. Meat Animal Production
D. Dairy Production
E. Meat Science
F. Physiology of Reproduction
G. Muscle Biology
H. Poultry Nutrition
I. Poultry Products
J. Animal Ethology