Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2009-2011 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

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Catalog Index

A| B| C | D| E| F| G| H| I | J| K| L| M| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z

Natural Resource Ecology and Management

300 |400 |Graduate Courses |500 |600 |

Animal Ecology (A Ecl)

The animal ecology curriculum provides its majors with an understanding of ecological principles and processes and their applications to natural resource management. It is oriented toward students desiring a general and flexible program in environmental biology and for those planning graduate study. Students may select from five options: Aquatic Sciences, Fisheries, Interpretation of Natural Resources, Preveterinary and Wildlife Care, or Wildlife. Graduates find employment as aquaculturists, aquatic ecologists, wildlife biologists, fisheries biologists, resource managers, and ecologists for industry, environmental consulting firms, natural resource and environmental agencies and organizations, zoos, and as educators.

Graduates of the Animal Ecology major understand the basic principles of animal biology, ecology and management, and relevant aspects of scientific communication, basic mathematics and sciences, computing applications, and personal and professional development. Five specific options prepare students for careers in aquatic sciences, fisheries, wildlife, interpretation of natural resources, wildlife care and veterinary sciences.Each option has specific outcomes expectations that include (1) the scope of the specialization and its relationships to broader aspects of animal ecology, biotic resource management, and other allied scientific disciplines and professions, (2) career opportunities and requirements, and (3) knowledge and skills appropriate for employment at technical and practitioner levels in each discipline. Graduates are able to communicate and work effectively in the multidisciplinary arena of ecology and natural resource management.

All options require three months of relevant work experience or study at a biological station prior to graduation. The latter may be accomplished at the university's affiliate field stations: Iowa Lakeside Laboratory at West Lake Okoboji, and Gulf Coast Research Laboratory at Ocean Springs, Mississippi. Information on these laboratories is available from the department's Student Services Center.

Preveterinary medicine preparation may be achieved while satisfying degree requirements in animal ecology.

Additional education and training can lead to other opportunities in such areas as research and management, natural resources planning and administration, teaching, and environmental consulting, among others. Graduate training is necessary for many specialized positions within the fields of animal ecology. Majors preparing for graduate study should consult with their academic adviser concerning appropriate coursework.

Students seeking certification to teach biology in secondary schools must meet requirements of the College of Human Sciences as well as those of the Animal Ecology curriculum. In addition, they must apply formally for admission to the teacher education program (see Index, Teacher Education Program). Students with an interest in careers in outdoor writing are encouraged to obtain a minor or a second major in journalism (see Index, Journalism and Communication, Courses and Programs). Students who wish to pursue a job as a conservation officer may wish to minor in criminal justice (see Index, Criminal Justice Studies).

The department offers a minor in animal ecology that may be earned by taking 15 credits in the department including 312, 365, NREM 120, plus four additional credits of Animal Ecology courses at the 300 level or above.

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

A Ecl 312. Ecology. (Cross-listed with Biol, EnSci). (3-3) Cr. 4. F.SS.Prereq: Biol 211L and 212L. Fundamental concepts and principles of ecology dealing with organisms, populations, communities and ecosystems. Laboratory and field exercises examine ecological principles and methods as well as illustrate habitats.

A Ecl 312I. Ecology. (Cross-listed with Ia LL, EnSci). Cr. 4. SS.An introduction to the principles of ecology at the population, community and ecosystem level. Field studies of local lakes, wetlands and prairies are used to examine factors controlling distributions, interactions, and roles of plants and animals in native ecosystems.

A Ecl 321. Fish Biology. (2-3) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: 365. Biology, ecology, and evolution of fishes. Emphasis on structure, physiology, and behavior, including a focus on the conservation and management of fishes and their habitats. Laboratory focus on fish morphology, survey methods, identification, distribution, habits, and habitats of fishes.

A Ecl 326I. Ornithology. (Cross-listed with Ia LL). Cr. 4. SS.The biology, ecology, and behavior of birds with emphasis on field studies of local avifauna. Group projects stress techniques of population analysis and methodology for population studies.

A Ecl 365. Vertebrate Biology. (Cross-listed with Biol). (3-2) Cr. 4. F.Prereq: Biol 212, 212L. Evolution, biology, and classification of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Emphasis on a comparative analysis of the structure and function of organ systems. Laboratory exercises concentrate on morphology and identification of orders of vertebrates.

A Ecl 366. Natural History of Iowa Vertebrates. (2-3) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Biol 211, 211L, 212, 212L. Vertebrate fauna of Iowa, including fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Species identification, habitat requirements, community structure and assessment, conservation issues that include historical population changes and value of wild animals to the region's ecological and economic health.

A Ecl 371. Ecological Methods. (Cross-listed with Biol). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 312; Stat 101 or 104. Quantitative techniques used in management of natural resources with emphasis on inventory and manipulation of habitat and animal populations. Nonmajor graduate credit.

A Ecl 401. Introductory Aquatic Animal Health and Medicine. (Cross-listed with B M S). (1-2) Cr. 1. S.8 weeks. Introductory course with focus on fin fish production, health and medicine. Course content will help define future roles for veterinarians, producers, and service providers. Emphasis will be placed on anatomy, pathology, infectious diseases, nutrition, regulatory constraints in production, food safety, and current research. Field trip to aquaculture facility.

A Ecl 404I. Behavioral Ecology. (Cross-listed with Ia LL). Cr. 4. Alt. SS., offered 2010.Prereq: Two semesters of biology. Animal coloniality, courtship, territoriality, predator defense, habitat selection, foraging, mating systems, and parental care will be examined in the field in order to evaluate various ecological and evolutionary theories of animal behavior.

A Ecl 418. Stream Ecology. (Dual-listed with 518). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: 486. Biological, chemical, physical, and geological processes that determine the structure and function of flowing water ecosystems. Current ecological theories as well as applications to stream management for water quality and fisheries.

A Ecl 419I. Vertebrate Ecology and Evolution. (Cross-listed with Ia LL). Cr. 4. SS.Field and laboratory study of representative vertebrates of northwestern Iowa. Observations and experimentation emphasize ecological histories by integrating concepts of functional morphology, behavioral ecology, and evolutionary biology. Nonmajor graduate credit.

A Ecl 420I. Amphibians and Reptiles. (Cross-listed with Ia LL). Cr. 4. Alt. SS., offered 2010.Prereq: Two semesters of biology. Ecology, behavior, and conservation biology of amphibians and reptiles with emphasis on their anatomy and morphology; temperature and water regulation; locomotion; life history; reproduction; population and community ecology; and conservation.

A Ecl 425. Aquatic Insects. (Dual-listed with 525). (Cross-listed with Ent). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: Biol 312 or equivalent. Courtney. Morphology, ecology, diversity, and significance of aquatic insects, with emphasis on the collection, curation and identification of taxa in local streams and lakes.

A Ecl 440. Fishery Management. (Dual-listed with 540). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 312, 321, Stat 101 or 104; credit or enrollment in 441 and 486. Biological basis of fishery management, fishery problems, and management practices for freshwater, anadromous, and marine fisheries.

A Ecl 441. Fisheries Techniques. (Dual-listed with 541). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 321 and Stat 104. Overview of field, laboratory, and analytical techniques associated with managing fisheries and aquatic resources. Specific topics include sampling design, fish and habitat sampling techniques, structural indices, age and growth, and biotelemetry.

A Ecl 442. Aquaculture. (Dual-listed with 542). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 486, credit or enrollment in 321. Concepts related to the culture of aquatic organisms including culture systems, water quality, nutrition, genetics, diseases, and marketing.

A Ecl 451. Wildlife Ecology and Management. (2-3) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 371. Ecological theory and practice of wildlife management, including, population ecology, habitat management, and current issues in the field. Course involves a series of case studies addressing actual wildlife issues using field and quantitative methods. Nonmajor graduate credit.

A Ecl 455. International Wildlife Issues. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: 365, 312 or graduate standing; NREM 120. Biological, political, social, and economic factors affecting the management of international wildlife resources. Nonmajor graduate credit.

A Ecl 457. Herpetology. (Dual-listed with 557). (Cross-listed with Biol). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: A Ecl 365 or Biol 351. Biology, ecology, and evolution of amphibians (salamanders, frogs, caecilians) and reptiles (lizards, snakes, tuatara, turtles, crocodilians). Emphasis on structure, physiological adaptation to different environments, behavior, reproduction, roles of amphibians and reptiles in ecosystems, and conservation. Laboratory focus on survey methods, identification, relationships, distribution, habits, and habitats of amphibians and reptiles.

A Ecl 458. Ornithology. (Dual-listed with 558). (Cross-listed with Biol). (2-3) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: A Ecl 365 or Biol 351. Biology, evolution, ecology and taxonomy of birds. Emphasis on structure, physiology, behavior, communication, navigation, reproduction, and conservation. Laboratory exercises complement lecture topics, emphasize identification and distribution of Midwest birds, and include field trips.

A Ecl 459. Mammalogy. (Dual-listed with 559). (Cross-listed with Biol). (2-3) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Biol 351 or A Ecl 365. Biology, ecology, and evolution of mammals. Emphasis on structure, physiological adaptation to different environments, behavior, reproduction, roles of mammals in ecosystems, and conservation. Laboratory focus on identification, distribution, habits, and habitats of mammals.

A Ecl 480. Studies in Marine Biology. Cr. 1-8. Repeatable. SS.Courses taken at Gulf Coast Research Laboratory and other marine biological stations are transferred to Iowa State University under this number.

A Ecl 486. Aquatic Ecology. (Cross-listed with Biol, EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Biol 312 or EnSci 381 or EnSci 402 or NREM 301. Structure and function of aquatic ecosystems with application to fishery and pollution problems. Emphasis on lacustrine, riverine, and wetland ecology. Nonmajor graduate credit.

A Ecl 486L. Aquatic Ecology Laboratory. (Cross-listed with Biol, EnSci). (0-3) Cr. 1. F.Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in 486. Field trips and laboratory exercises to accompany 486. Hands-on experience with aquatic research and monitoring techniques and concepts. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

A Ecl 515. Ecology of Freshwater Invertebrates, Plants, and Algae. (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: 312. Identification, biology, and ecological requirements of freshwater invertebrates, plants and algae. Additional emphases on community sampling methods and analysis, and use of organisms as tools for aquatic ecosystem health assessment.

A Ecl 516. Avian Ecology. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 365, 312, or graduate standing. Current topics and theories including avian breeding and foraging ecology, population biology, community structure, habitat selection, field methodologies, and data interpretation.

A Ecl 518. Stream Ecology. (Dual-listed with 418). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2009.Prereq: 486. Biological, chemical, physical, and geological processes that determine the structure and function of flowing water ecosystems. Current ecological theories as well as applications to stream management for water quality and fisheries.

A Ecl 520. Fisheries Science. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: 312, 321. Concepts, approaches, and techniques for assessment of recreational and commercial fisheries. Scope will range from individual fish to entire ecosystems, both freshwater and marine.

A Ecl 523I. Fish Ecology. (Cross-listed with Ia LL). Cr. 4. Alt. SS., offered 2010.Basic principles of fish interaction with the biotic and abiotic environment. Field methods, taxonomy, and biology of fish with emphasis on the fish fauna of northwestern Iowa.

A Ecl 525. Aquatic Insects. (Dual-listed with 425). (Cross-listed with Ent). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2011.Prereq: Biol 312 or equivalent. Courtney. Morphology, ecology, diversity and significance of aquatic insects, with emphasis on the collection, curation and identification of taxa in local streams and lakes.

A Ecl 526I. Advanced Field Ornithology. (Cross-listed with Ia LL). Cr. 2. SS.Prereq: Concurrent registration in Ia LL 326I. Field study of birds of the upper Midwest; extended field trip to Minnesota and Wisconsin; individual or group project.

A Ecl 531. Conservation Biology. (Cross-listed with EEOB). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 312; Biol 313 or graduate standing. Examination of conservation issues from a population and a community perspective. Population-level analysis will focus on the role of genetics, demography, and environment in determining population viability. Community perspectives will focus on topics such as habitat fragmentation, reserve design, biodiversity assessment, and restoration ecology.

A Ecl 531I. Conservation Biology. (Cross-listed with Ia LL, EEOB). Cr. 4. Alt. SS., offered 2010.Prereq: Ia LL 312I. Population-and community-level examination of factors influencing the viability of plant and animal populations from both demographic and genetic perspectives; assessment of biodiversity; design and management of preserves.

A Ecl 535I. Restoration Ecology. (Cross-listed with Ia LL, EEOB, EnSci). Cr. 4. Alt. SS., offered 2010.Prereq: A course in ecology. Ecological principles for the restoration of native ecosystems; establishment (site preparation, selection of seed mixes, planting techniques) and management (fire, mowing, weed control) of native vegetation; evaluation of restorations. Emphasis on the restoration of prairie and wetland vegetation.

A Ecl 540. Fishery Management. (Dual-listed with 440). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 312, 321; credit or enrollment in 541 and Biol 586; Stat 401. Biological basis of fishery management, fishery problems, and practices for management of freshwater, anadromous, and marine fisheries.

A Ecl 541. Fisheries Techniques. (Dual-listed with 441). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: 321 and Stat 104. Overview of field, laboratory, and analytical techniques associated with managing fisheries and aquatic resources. Specific topics include sampling design, fish and habitat sampling techniques, structural indices, age and growth, and biotelemetry.

A Ecl 542. Aquaculture. (Dual-listed with 442). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: 485, credit or enrollment in 321. Concepts related to the culture of aquatic organisms including culture systems, water quality, nutrition, genetic, diseases, and marketing.

A Ecl 551. Wildlife Behavioral Ecology. (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2010.Prereq: a course in ecology or animal behavior. The study of how an animal's behavior affects its ability to survive and reproduce in its environment. Topics represent the interface of ecology, evolution, and behavior. Wildlife defined broadly.

A Ecl 557. Herpetology. (Dual-listed with 457). (Cross-listed with EEOB). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: A Ecl 365 or Biol 351. Biology, ecology, and evolution of amphibians (salamanders, frogs, caecilians) and reptiles (lizards, snakes, tuatara, turtles, crocodilians). Emphasis on structure, physiological adaptation to different environments, behavior, reproduction, roles of amphibians and reptiles in ecosystems, and conservation. Laboratory focus on survey methods, identification, relationships, distribution, habits, and habitats of amphibians and reptiles.

A Ecl 558. Ornithology. (Dual-listed with 458). (Cross-listed with EEOB). (2-3) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: A Ecl 365 or Biol 351. Biology, evolution, ecology and taxonomy of birds. Emphasis on structure, physiology, behavior, communication, navigation, reproduction, and conservation. Laboratory exercises complement lecture topics, emphasize identification and distribution of Midwest birds, and include field trips.

A Ecl 559. Mammalogy. (Dual-listed with 459). (Cross-listed with EEOB). (2-3) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: Biol 351 or A Ecl 365. Biology, ecology, and evolution of mammals. Emphasis on structure, physiological adaptation to different environments, behavior, reproduction, roles of mammals in ecosystems, and conservation. Laboratory focus on identification, distribution, habits, and habitats of mammals.

A Ecl 570. Landscape Ecology. (Cross-listed with EEOB). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: Permission of instructor; EEOB 588; a course in calculus. The study of ecological and evolutionary processes within a spatial context with emphasis on behavior, population, and community dynamics.

A Ecl 573. Techniques for Biology Teaching. (Cross-listed with Ia LL, EEOB). Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. SS.The development and implementation of laboratory exercises suitable for inclusion in elementary, middle, high school, and community college biology and environmental courses. Exercises will be built around common organisms and ecosystems in Iowa. Field trips.
A. Animal Biology (Same as Ia LL 573A)
G. Limnology (Same as Ia LL 573G)
H. Animal Behavior (Same as Ia LL 573H)
W. Project WET (Same as Ia LL 573W)

A Ecl 589. Population Ecology. (Cross-listed with EEOB). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: Biol 312, Stat 101 or 104, a course in calculus, or graduate standing. Concepts and theories of population dynamics with emphasis on models of growth, predation, competition, and regulation.

A Ecl 590I. Graduate Independent Study. (Cross-listed with Ia LL, EEOB, Anthr). Cr. 1-4. Repeatable. SS.Prereq: Graduate classification and permission of instructor.

A Ecl 599. Creative Component. Cr. arr.Prereq: Nonthesis M.S. option only.

Courses primarily for graduate students

A Ecl 600. Seminar. (2-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.Current topics in ecological research, fish and wildlife management, and environmental problems related to fish or wildlife resources.

A Ecl 611. Analysis of Populations. (Cross-listed with EEOB). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2010.Prereq: Biol 312; Stat 401; a course in calculus. Quantitative techniques for analyzing vertebrate population data to estimate parameters such as density and survival. Emphasis on statistical inference and computing.

A Ecl 698. Animal Ecology Teaching Practicum. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.Prereq: Graduate classification in animal ecology and permission of instructor. Graduate student experience in the animal ecology teaching program. Satisfactory-fail only.

A Ecl 699. Research. Cr. arr. Repeatable.

A Ecl 699I. Research. (Cross-listed with Ia LL, Anthr, GDCB, EEOB). Cr. 1-4. Repeatable.