Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2007-2009 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

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Sociology (Soc)

200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses | www.soc.iastate.edu

R. Paul Lasley, Chair of Department
Distinguished Professors: C. Flora
Distinguished Professors (Emeritus): Beal
University Professors: Lorenz, Woodman
University Professors (Emeritus): Goudy
Professors: Besser, Butler, Bystydzienski, Dobratz, J. Flora, Jones-Johnson, Keith, Korsching, Lasley, Sapp, Sawyer, Wells
Professors (Emeritus): Blake, Bruton, Bultena, Cohen, Hoiberg, Hraba, Klonglan, Miller, Mulford, Oulman, Padgitt, Ryan, Schafer, Tait
Professors (Collaborators): Simons
Associate Professors: Aigner, Allen, Bird, Cast, Delisi, Harrod, Hochstetler, Mazur, Morton, Roberts, Schweingruber
Associate Professors (Adjunct): Waggoner
Associate Professors (Collaborators): Bell, Hinrichs
Assistant Professors: Krier, Maldonado-Pabon, Monahan, Stewart, Tsushima

Undergraduate Study

Sociology graduates will understand and demonstrate: 1) general knowledge of sociology; 2) research methods in sociology; 3) critical thinking skills; 4) application of sociology to pressing social issues; 5) sociological and professional values; 6) information technology; 7) communication skills; and 8) personal and career development.

The department offers course work leading to either a bachelor of arts or bachelor of science in sociology. Additionally, a bachelor of science in Public Service and Administration in Agriculture is offered. The department offers course work for the Interdisciplinary Studies major in Criminology and Criminal Justice and a minor in Criminal Justice Studies. Programs of study in sociology offered in both the College of Agriculture and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences are outlined in this section. For the undergraduate curriculum in Liberal Arts and Sciences, with a major in sociology leading to the degrees of bachelor of arts and bachelor of science, see Liberal Arts and Sciences, Curricula. For the undergraduate curriculum in agriculture, with major in public service and administration in agriculture, leading to the degree bachelor of science, see Agriculture, Curriculum in Public Service and Administration in Agriculture. For the undergraduate curriculum in Liberal Arts and Sciences, with a minor in criminal justice studies, see Liberal Arts and Sciences, Curriculum.

Graduates understand how social institutions, communities, and organizations work and change; they can examine the causes and consequences of conformity, deviance, and inequality. They can apply sociological understanding of human behavior to practical work situations and everyday life. Graduates can read critically, think independently, and communicate effectively about social issues and social policy.

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences-Sociology

A major in sociology can serve as a liberal arts education; as preparation for various positions in social service and related occupations in business and industry; as background for professional education in such areas as law and theology or as a basis for graduate professional training as a sociologist in academic, government, business, and industrial settings.

Departmental requirements for sociology majors include the following supporting course: Philosophy including 230 and one upper level Philosophy course; English 302 or 309 or 314; One of the following courses: Statistics101 or 104; At least three additional credits with a Mathematics designator.

A program of study that meets the needs and interests of the student and department requirements will be developed in consultation with the major adviser. Programs of study will include 115; 130 or 134; 202; three credits from 310, 380 or 420; 302; 305; three credits from 327, 330, 331 or 332; 401; 9 credits of upper level electives. Majors must receive grades of C or better in Engl 150 and 250, and a grade of C or better in either Engl 302 or 309 or 314. Programs leading to a bachelor of arts degree will emphasize additional coursework in groups I, II and IV of the general education requirements. Programs leading to a bachelor of science degree will emphasize additional coursework in groups III and IV of the general education requirements. Some of the possible fields of concentration are criminal justice systems, community (urban and rural) sociology, family sociology, sociology of work, social science teaching, research methods and statistics, social change and development, complex organizations, human population and ecology, social inequality, social psychology, and sociological theory.

In consultation with their advisers, students may gain work experience and develop their skills in their field of concentration through the field observation and practice options of 460.

The department offers a minor in sociology which may be earned by completing 15 credits in sociology including: Sociology 130 or 134; 3 credits from 310, 380 or 420; 3 credits from 264, 305 or 381; an additional 6 credits in sociology courses. At least 9 of the 15 credits must be at the 300 level or higher, 6 of these credits must be taken at ISU with a minimal grade of C.

College of Agriculture-Public Service and Administration in Agriculture

The curriculum in public service and administration in agriculture is designed for students who desire an interdisciplinary education to pursue a career with agriculturally related governmental and nonprofit agencies, or with businesses and industries that are concerned with public services in agriculture, natural resources or rural communities. Students will explore the planning and implementing of rural and agriculturally related programs in organizations, communities (town, city, or county), multicounty areas, states, regions, and at the federal level.

The curriculum has a broad base of general education subjects including credits in communications, mathematics, physical and biological sciences, social sciences, and humanities. The technical subjects represent a combination of sociology, economics, public administration and agriculture, with emphases on social and economic change, history of public services, complex organizations, interagency relationships, community leadership, community action, adoption and diffusion, group dynamics, and political and legal behavior as they relate to agriculture and rural areas. For teh Interdisciplinary Studies major in Criminology and Criminal Justice, see Liberal Arts and Sciences, Curriculum.

Graduate Study

The department offers work for the degrees master of science and doctor of philosophy with majors in sociology and rural sociology and minor work for students majoring in other departments. For M.S. and Ph.D. departmental requirements, see Program of Graduate Study for Degrees in Sociology and Rural Sociology, available from the department office. The department offers concentrations in a number of areas, e.g., community studies and development; sociology of families, inequality, food systems, agriculture and environment; methodology; social change and development; criminology; the economy, organizations and work; and social psychology. The Department of Sociology does not offer a nonthesis master's program.

Graduates have a broad understanding of sociology, address complex societal problems, and communicate effectively with scientific colleagues and the general public in both formal and informal settings. They understand sociological theory, conduct research, and are prepared to educate college students and contribute to public policy.

Although the department stipulates no language requirement for either the degree master of science or the degree doctor of philosophy, specifying competence in one or more languages may be desirable in some instances.

The department also participates in the interdepartmental program in interdepartmental majors in sustainable agriculture, transportation and water resources, and interdepartmental minors in gerontology (see Index).

Courses open for nonmajor graduate credit: 377, 401, 411, 415, 420, 450, 476.

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

Soc 110. Orientation to Public Service and Administration in Agriculture. Cr. R. F. Survey of public service and administration in agriculture. Exploration of career tracks and career planning. Recommended during first semester of freshman year or as soon as possible after transfer into the department.

Soc 115. Orientation to Sociology. Cr. R. F.S. Orientation to sociology. A familiarization with University and LAS College requirements and procedures. Occupational tracks and career options open to sociology; introduction to career planning. Recommended during first semester of freshman year, or as soon as possible after transfer into the department. Satisfactory-fail only.

Soc 130. Rural Institutions and Organizations. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. An introductory analysis of sociological concepts and theories as they relate to rural institutions and organizations. Emphasis on the static structure and function of these institutions and organizations and on their dynamic adaptation to changing societal, environmental, and economic conditions. General sociological principles and perspectives. Credit for only Soc 130 or 134 may be applied toward graduation.

Soc 134. Introduction to Sociology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Social interaction and group behavior with emphasis on the scientific study of contemporary U.S. society, including issues relating to socialization, inequality, and changing rural and urban communities. Analysis of relationships among the institutions of family, religion, political participation, work, and leisure. Credit for only Soc 130 or 134 may be applied toward graduation.
H. Honors.

Soc 202. Introduction to Research Methods. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 130 or 134, credit in Stat 101 or concurrent enrollment in Stat 101. A survey of the principal research methods used in sociological analysis.

Soc 219. Sociology of Intimate Relationships. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: 130 or 134. Analysis of intimate relationships among couples using a sociological perspective. Attention is given to singlehood; dating and courtship; sexuality; mate selection, cohabitation, and marriage. Relationship quality, communication, conflict and dissolution of these types of relationship will also be explored.

Soc 235. Social Problems and American Values. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 130 or 134. Sociological concepts, theories and methods to analyze the causes and consequences of social problems. Social problems discussed may include crime, substance abuse, income inequalities, discrimination, poverty, race relations, health care, family issues, and the environment. How American culture and values shape societal conditions, public discourse and policy.

Soc 241. Youth and Crime. (Cross-listed with CJ St). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 130 or 134. An examination of delinquency that focuses on the relationship between youth as victims and as offenders, social and etiological features of delinquency, the role of the criminal justice system, delinquents' rights, and traditional and alternative ways of dealing with juvenile crime.

Soc 264. Small Group Dynamics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 130 or 134. An introduction to intra- and intergroup dynamics in small groups. Group decision-making, coalitions, conformity, intergroup relations, status and role effects, leadership, group development and group conflict. Includes student participation in small group processes.

Soc 302. Advanced Research Methods. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.Alt. SS., offered 2008. Prereq: 202; Stat 101; Sociology or PSA Major. Experience in designing research projects, collecting and analyzing data and reporting results.

Soc 305. Social Psychology: A Sociological Perspective. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: 130 or 134. Examination of human behavior in a social environment with emphasis on development of the self, interpersonal relations, attitudes, and small groups.

Soc 310. Community. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 130 or 134. Analysis of evolving theory and research of community as an ideal type, an ecological system, a political economy, and an interactional field; examination of the impact of economic, cultural, social and political infrastructures on community power structures and change processes in a global era.

Soc 325. Transition in Agriculture. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 130 or 134 or permission of instructor. The impacts of agricultural changes on farm families, rural communities, and consumers. Past, present, and future trends in family farms and their social implications.

Soc 327. Sex and Gender in Society. (Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: 130 or 134. How the biological fact of sex is transformed into a system of gender stratification. The demographics and social positions of women and men in the family, education, media, politics, and the economy. Theories of the social-psychological and sociological bases for behavior and attitudes of women and men. The relationship between gender, class, and race.

Soc 328. Sociology of Masculinities and Manhood. (Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Soc 130, 134, or W S 201. Examination of socially constructed and idealized images of manhood, the nature of social hierarchies and relations constructed on the basis of imagery, ideologies, and norms of masculinity. Theories on gender (sociological, psychological, and biological). Particular attention given to theory and research on gender variations among men by race, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, physical ability and age.

Soc 330. Ethnic and Race Relations. (Cross-listed with Af Am). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: 130 or 134. Analysis of ethnic and race relations, particularly in America; emphasis on the sociology and psychology of race and ethnic relations.

Soc 331. Social Class and Inequality. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: 130 or 134. Social stratification and processes resulting in social and economic inequalities; implications of status, class, and poverty for people of different races, ethnicities, and gender.

Soc 332. The Latino/Latina Experience in U.S. Society. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 130 or 134. Examination of the social, historical, economic and political experience of varied Latino ethnic groups in the U.S. - primarily focusing on Mexican, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans.

Soc 334. Politics and Society. (Cross-listed with Pol S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: A course in political science or sociology. The relationship between politics and society with emphasis on American society. Discussion of theories of inequality, power, social movements, elites, ruling classes, democracy, and capitalism.

Soc 340. Deviant and Criminal Behavior. (Cross-listed with CJ St). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.SS. Prereq: 130 or 134. Theory and research on the etiology of types of social deviance; issues relating to crime, antisocial behavior and social policies designed to control deviant behavior.

Soc 341. Criminology. (Cross-listed with CJ St). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 130 or 134. The nature of crime and criminology; the concept of crime; statistics and theories of criminality; major forms of crime; official responses to crime and control of crime.

Soc 345. Population and Society. (Cross-listed with Env S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 130 or 134. Human population growth and structure; impact on food, environment, and resources; gender issues; trends of births, deaths, and migration; projecting future population; population policies and laws; comparison of the United States with other societies throughout the world.

Soc 351. Police and Society. (Cross-listed with CJ St). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Soc 241 or CJ ST 240. Introduction and overview of law enforcement in the United States. Theory and research on police history, function, and organization; constitutional issues of policing; and critical topics, such as community policing, officer discretion and decision-making, corruption, use of force, and racial profiling. The course illustrates the interconnections between communities, police organizations, citizens, and criminal offenders.

Soc 352. Punishment, Corrections, and Society. (Cross-listed with CJ St). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Soc 241 or CJ ST 240. Introduction and overview of corrections in the United States. Theory and research on probation, parole, intermediate sanctions, prison, inmate society, inmate behavior and misconduct, capital punishment, recidivism, correctional treatment, rehabilitation, and offender reintegration into society.

Soc 362. Applied Ethics in Agriculture. (Cross-listed with Econ). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Econ 101 or Soc 130 or Soc 134, junior or senior status in the College of Agriculture. Identify major ethical issues and dilemmas in the conduct of agricultural and agribusiness management and decision making. Discuss and debate proper ethical behavior in these issues and situations and the relationship between business and personal ethical behavior.

Soc 377. Social Dimensions of Religion. (Cross-listed with Relig). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Prior course work in Religious Studies or Sociology required. The influence of religion in society, both as a conservator of values and as a force for social change. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Soc 380. Sociology of Work. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 130 or 134. Inequalities (gender, race, class) related to jobs, occupations, firms, and industries. Satisfactions, rewards, alienation, discrimination, and other topics of importance to workers are examined.

Soc 381. Social Psychology of Small Group Behavior. (Cross-listed with Psych). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Soc 305 or Psych 280. A survey of small group theory and research from an interdisciplinary, social psychological perspective.

Soc 382. Environmental Sociology. (Cross-listed with Env S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Soc 130, 134 or 3 credits of Env S. Environment-society relations; social construction of nature and the environment; social and environmental impacts of resource extraction, production, and consumption; environmental inequality; environmental mobilization and movements; U.S. and international examples.

Soc 401. Contemporary Sociological Theories. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: 9 credits in sociology. Both historical and modern social theories as applied to understanding and researching the social world. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Soc 402. White-Collar Crime. (Cross-listed with CJ St). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Soc 241 or CJ ST 240. Introduction and overview of white-collar crime as a form of deviance. Theory and research on occupational, corporate, and organizational offending; prevalence, costs, and consequences of white-collar crime; predictors and correlates of white-collar crime; and political, business, and public policy responses to white-collar crime.

Soc 411. Social Change in Developing Countries. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 130 or 134 plus 3 credits in social sciences. Social change and development in developing countries; international interdependence; causes and consequences of persistent problems in agriculture, city growth, employment, gender equality, basic needs; local and worldwide efforts to foster social change and international development. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Soc 412. Senior Seminar on Career Development. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Most of major core courses, senior classification. Transition from student to professional. Career development procedures including self-assessment, short- and long-term goals, strategies for the job search, development of contacts and sources, resumes and interviews. Enrollment preferred in first semester as senior. Satisfactory-fail only.

Soc 415. Sociology of Technology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 130 or 134 plus 3 credits in social sciences. Review of physical, biological, and social approaches to technology evaluation. Examination of public responses to complex and controversial technology. Strategies for gaining adoption/rejection of technology. Applications to topics in agriculture, development, and marketing. Credit for only Soc 415 or 515 may be applied toward graduation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Soc 420. Complex Organizations. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.SS. Prereq: 130 or 134 plus 3 credits in social sciences. Study of bureaucracies and other large organizations as social systems through the perspective of basis social processes and structural variables. Incorporates topics of organizational effectiveness, power and change. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Soc 431. Chicanos/Chicanas in Contemporary Society. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 130 or 134. An interdisciplinary examination of Chicanos/as, the largest U.S. Latino ethnic group. Special attention will be given to social conflict and social transformation as it relates to contemporary Chicano/a issues, particularly in the Midwest.

Soc 435. Urban Society. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 130 or 134 plus 3 credits in social sciences. Development of cities and urban systems; human and spatial ecology; urban transformation, decline, and revitalization; poverty; immigration; homelessness; residential segregation; housing policy; urban social movements; local governance; alternative solutions and planning for cities; international comparisons.

Soc 460. Criminal and Juvenile Justice Practicum. (Cross-listed with CJ St). Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Junior or senior classification; permission of criminal justice studies coordinator; major or minor in sociology, or criminal justice studies minor. Study of the criminal and juvenile justice systems and social control processes. Supervised placement in a police department, prosecutor's office, court, probation and parole department, penitentiary, juvenile correctional institution, community-based rehabilitation program, or related agency. Not more than a total of 12 credits of field experience (Soc 454 and 460) may be counted toward graduation. No credits in Soc 460 may be used to satisfy minimum sociology requirements for sociology majors. Satisfactory-fail only.

Soc 464. Community Action and Leadership. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.SS. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Methods of planning, organizing, and conducting planned social change and other action programs in communities. Strategies of change, change agent roles, client need identification, community organization strategies, citizen participation, leadership identification and development, program planning and evaluation.

Soc 484. Topical Studies in Criminal and Juvenile Justice. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology and permission from instructor. Thematic or topical issues and studies dealing with the sociology of police, judiciary, institutional and community-based corrections, gender/ethnicity and crime/delinquency, criminal and delinquent gangs, and crime and delinquency prevention.

Soc 485. Sociology of the Family. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. The contemporary family in developing, industrial, and post-industrial societies. Effects of modernization, cultural change, and family policies on family dynamics, structures, and functions.

Soc 490. Independent Study. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology and permission of instructor. Students in the College of Agriculture must be of junior or senior classification and may use no more than 6 credits of Soc 490 toward the total of 128 credits required for graduation. Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may count no more than 9 credits of 490 toward graduation.
A. General Sociology
B. Rural Sociology
H. Honors
E. Senior Seminar

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

Soc 505. History of Social Thought. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 401. Reviews the historical origins of social ideas about society how social thought has evolved throughout history, and how these affect modern sociological thinking.

Soc 506. Classical Sociological Theory. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Soc 401 or 505. The origins of the canonical works of sociology in the mid-Industrial Revolution period including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim and others.

Soc 509. Agroecosystem Analysis. (Cross-listed with Agron, Anthr, SusAg). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Senior or above classification. Experiential, interdisciplinary examination of Midwestern agricultural and food systems, emphasizing field visits, with some classroom activities. Focus on understanding multiple elements, perspectives (agronomic, economic, ecological, social, etc.), and scales of operation.

Soc 511. Intermediate Research Methods. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 302 and Stat 401. Research methods in sociology including problem selection, research design, hypothesis formulation, sampling, alternative data collection techniques. Designing a research strategy appropriate for a variety of social science questions, and assessing the appropriateness, validity, and generalizability of published sociological research.

Soc 512. Sociological Measurement. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 511. Reliability and validity for observed and latent variables; exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis in the construction and evaluation of measurement models. Applications using LISREL, AMOS, and other programs.

Soc 513. Qualitative Research Methods. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 511. Applied qualitative research methods in sociology. Design and implementation of a course-based research project including data collection, analysis, and presentation of results. Qualitative data gathering techniques using observational, historical, in-depth interviewing or content analysis approaches. Laboratory emphasis on completion of data gathering, analysis, and report writing.

Soc 515. Sociology of Technology. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 6 hours of social science. Off campus and non majors only - offered as demand warrants. Linkages among science, technology, and society. Physical, life, and social science approaches to technology evaluation. Public responses to complex and controversial technologies. Strategies for gaining adoption/rejection of technology. Required in the Master of Agriculture program. Only one of Soc 415 or 515 may be counted toward graduation credits.

Soc 520. Social Psychology: A Sociological Perspective. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 305 or Psych 280. Examination of cognitive, symbolic interaction, exchange, role-reference group, and dramaturgical approaches. Assessment of contemporary issues in social psychology.

Soc 521. Small Groups. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 305 or Psych 280. Examination of alternative theoretical models and methods of studying small groups.

Soc 522. Attitude and Attitude Change. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 305 or Psych 280. Analysis of theories of attitude and attitude change; current controversies between the theories examined, as well as supporting research.

Soc 528. Sociology of Gender. (Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Examination of the social construction of gender and the social organization of gender inequality. Analysis of gender identity in socialization, interpersonal behavior, the media, and the economy. Investigation of the intersection of gender, race, and class.

Soc 529. Racial and Ethnic Inequality. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Analysis of racial and ethnic inequality in the United States and the world; focus on the implications of the changing world social and economic order for differences in racial and ethnic groups relative to wealth, status, and power; a critical examination of majority-group domination of minority groups in various societies.

Soc 530. Social Organization. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Methodological and analytical issues associated with the study of group structure; contemporary theories of social organization.

Soc 532. Organizations and Their Environments. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Comparative analysis of complex organizations; complex organizations as semi-open systems. Interorganizational relations and organizational effectiveness.

Soc 533. Models of Community. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Emphasis on different models or frames of reference used in community analysis. Theoretical and methodological tools, current views of community problems, and explanation of social and cultural change are presented for each model.

Soc 534. Social Stratification. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Critical examination of the causes and consequences of social stratification and inequality; classical theories, contemporary frameworks, and recent empirical studies; international stratification patterns.

Soc 535. Urban Sociology. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 6 credits in social sciences. Theoretical, conceptual, and methodological approaches to understanding transformation of urban society in comparative perspective; interrelations among demographic, social, economic, and political dimensions of persistent urban problems and of urban development; examination of case studies.

Soc 541. Technological Innovation, Social Change, and Development. (Cross-listed with T SC, U St). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in social sciences. Sources, theories and models of technological innovation; social and institutional contexts of technology transfer; appropriate/intermediate technology; issues and methods of impact assessment; planning technology related social change; democratic control of technological innovations and application; local and international case studies.

Soc 542. Rural Development. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Sociological perspectives on contemporary theory and practice in rural development. Emphasis on the U.S. with international comparisons. Rural development approaches examined in a global context. The role of local, state, and national agencies, institutions of higher education, and the private sector in rural development will be assessed.

Soc 544. Sociology of Food and Agricultural Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Social organization of food and fiber production, processing, and distribution systems. Sociological comparison of conventional and alternative production systems; gender roles in agriculture and food systems; local, national and global food systems; perspectives on food and agricultural research and policy.

Soc 546. Organizational Strategies for Diversified Farming Systems. (Cross-listed with SusAg, Hort, Agron). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: SusAg 509. Examination of the organization and operation of complex, diversified farming systems using tools and perspectives drawn from ecology, agronomy, and sociology. The course includes a significant field component focused on an Iowa farm.

Soc 547. Sociology of Adoption and Diffusion. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Sociological and social-psychological theories related to adoption and diffusion of new ideas; analysis of adoption and diffusion models; methods of field research; factors related to rates and intensity of adoption and diffusion; new directions in diffusion research.

Soc 548. Sociology of the Environment. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Social causes and social consequences of environmental problems. Interrelationship between social inequality and environmental inequality. Social construction and social experience of the environment. Contemporary developments in the social theory of the environment. International and domestic implications.

Soc 564. Community Action Practice and Theory. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Methods of planning, organizing, and conducting planned social change and other action programs in communities; strategies of change, change agent roles, client need identification, community organization strategies, citizen participation, leadership identification and development, program planning and evaluation.

Soc 566. Political Sociology. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology and/or political science. The relationship between state and society with emphasis on American society. Analysis of theoretical frameworks, political participation, power, social movements, elites, democracy, and capitalist society.

Soc 582. Theories of Social Deviance. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Theory and research regarding causes of and reactions to deviant behavior. Mental illness, homicide, family violence, and property crime are among the types of deviant behavior considered.

Soc 584. Current Issues in Crime and Justice. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Discussion of current research and theory in crime and delinquency; topics include the purpose and role of law in social life; emerging theoretical directions in criminology; recent work on specific forms of criminality; controversies in the criminal justice system.

Soc 585. Current Research in Family Sociology. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology. Course presents a general overview of the field of family sociology. Topics to be covered include demographic trends, family theory and empirical research, as well as current debates in the discipline.

Soc 590. Special Topics. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. Prereq: 6 credits in sociology; senior or graduate classification.
A. General Sociology
B. Rural Sociology

Soc 591. Orientation to Sociology. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Formal admission into the sociology graduate program. Introduction to the department, current graduate student policies at department and university levels, departmental administrative procedures. Required of graduate students. Satisfactory-fail only.

Soc 599. Research for Master's Thesis. Cr. 1-6. Repeatable.
A. General Sociology
B. Rural Sociology

Courses for graduate students

Soc 607. Contemporary Sociological Theory. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 6 graduate credits in sociology. Provides a review of modern sociological thought, issues, and controversies as they affect current research and discourse in the discipline.

Soc 610. Foundations of Sustainable Agriculture. (Cross-listed with SusAg, A E, Agron, Anthr). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate classification, permission of instructor. Historical, biophysical, socioeconomic, and ethical dimensions of agricultural sustainability. Strategies for evaluating existing and emerging systems of agriculture in terms of core concepts of sustainability and their theoretical contexts.

Soc 613. Advanced Theory Construction and Causal Modeling. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 512 and Stat 404. Formal strategies of research design and analysis using structural equations with latent variables. Strategies for the analysis of multi-informant and panel data, with emphasis on distributional problems and diagnostics.

Soc 640. Comparative Social Change. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 6 graduate credits in sociology. Contemporary theories of social change, modernization, dependency, and development are critically examined; methodological issues identified; supporting research explored; applicability of theoretical models, concepts, and strategies to current national and international needs are evaluated.

Soc 675. Current Topics in Family Sociology. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. S., offered 2009. Current developments in a selected field in the sociology of family and the life course.

Soc 698. Seminars in Sociology. (3-0) Cr. 3.
L. Community Studies and Development
M. Criminology
N. The Economy, Organizations, and Work
O. Food Systems, Agriculture, and the Environment
P. Methodology
Q. Social Change and Development
R. Social Inequality
S. Social Psychology
T. Sociology of Families

Soc 699. Dissertation Research. Cr. 1-8. Repeatable.
A. General Sociology
B. Rural Sociology