Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2007-2009 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

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Mechanical Engineering (M E)

200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses |

Judy Vance, Chair of Department
Distinguished Professors: Bernard
Distinguished Professors (Emeritus): Serovy
University Professors (Emeritus): Bahadur
Professors: Brighton, Brown, Chandra, Devries, Heindel, Kelkar, Molian, Nelson, Okiishi, Oliver, Pate, Pletcher, Sannier, Vance
Professors (Emeritus): Bathie, Baumgarten, Colver, Cook, Danofsky, DeJong, Eide, Hall, Hendrickson, Henkin, Junkhan, Kavanagh, Mischke, Peters, Roberts, Shapiro, Spinrad, Wechsler
Professors (Collaborators): Garimella, Vanderploeg, Vangerpen
Associate Professors: Anex, Bastawros, Battaglia, Bryden, Luecke, Mann, Maxwell, Olsen
Professors (Emeritus): Joensen, Vanmeter
Associate Professors (Adjunct): Gray
Associate Professors (Collaborators): Prusa
Assistant Professors: Faidley, Kong, Meyer, Shrotriya, Subramaniam, Sundararajan, Winer, Zou
Assistant Professors (Adjunct): Sadaka

Undergraduate Study

For the undergraduate curriculum in mechanical engineering leading to the degree bachelor of science, seeCollege of Engineering, Curricula.This curriculum is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Mechanical engineers are typically involved with such activities as

*generation, distribution, and use of energy

*development and application of manufacturing systems and processes

*automation and control of mechanical and thermal systems

*design of various products for consumer and commercial markets

About one-fourth of all engineers practicing today have been educated as mechanical engineers. Their activities include research, development, design, testing, production, technical sales, and technical management.

Mechanical engineers are characterized by personal creativity, breadth of knowledge, and versatility. For these reasons they are found to function and thrive as valuable members and leaders of multidisciplinary teams. Through clever use of analysis, modeling, design, synthesis, and interpersonal skills they solve important problems to improve our world.

To ensure the success of students completing the curriculum in mechanical engineering, the department has established the following educational objectives:

1. The department provides a sound foundation for graduates to pursue a variety of careers. Most graduates will find immediate employment in industry, government laboratories or consulting, but some will pursue graduate or professional studies in such fields as engineering, business, law or medicine.

2. Graduates will apply the problem solving skills they have learned at Iowa State University to meet the challenging demands and increasing responsibilities of a successful career.

3. Graduates will continue to learn as they grow in their profession, using modern technology and communication skills to contribute as team members or leaders in solving important problems for their employers and for society.

The mechanical engineering curriculum is organized to provide students with a broad foundation in mathematics and the sciences of physics and chemistry.

*Through courses in these subjects, students will attain the basic knowledge required to understand and analyze mechanical engineering systems.

This background is extended and organized through studies in solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, heat transfer, materials, and electrical applications.

*Upon completion of courses in these areas of the curriculum, students will be able to apply engineering principles to create, analyze or improve processes, devices or systems to accomplish desired objectives.

A major focus throughout the mechanical engineering curriculum is a series of experiences that emphasize engineering design.

*Students will develop engineering judgment through open-ended problems that require establishment of reasonable engineering assumptions and realistic constraints.

In addition, a sequence of courses emphasizing engineering design begins in the first year and culminates with a capstone design experience.

*Students will not only be able to apply their engineering knowledge to real-life design problems but also to critically evaluate the solutions.

Development of skills needed to be independent, creative thinkers, effective communicators, and contributing team members is emphasized throughout the curriculum.

*Students will learn to effectively work in multi-disciplinary teams to solve engineering problems subject to technical and business constraints through critical thinking that crosses content boundaries.

*Students will develop an understanding of the societal context in which they will practice engineering. They will include ethical, legal, and aesthetic considerations in design of engineering components and systems.

The curriculum provides flexibility to allow students to broaden their perspectives or to focus in more depth in areas of particular interest. Organized sequences of technical electives can be chosen from areas which represent major concentrations in the field of mechanical engineering. Optional areas of specialization include energy conversion and utilization, thermal system design, mechanical system design, materials and manufacturing, nuclear engineering, thermal and environmental engineering, and vehicle propulsion.

*Elective courses provide additional emphasis in terms of the student's unique educational goals, whether they include immediate entry into industry or further study at the graduate level.

In addition, students elect courses in the humanities, social sciences, U.S. diversity and international perspectives.

*Through these courses, students develop an understanding of the societal context in which they will practice engineering, including environmental, legal, aesthetic, and human aspects.

Students in mechanical engineering are encouraged to participate in the cooperative education program or to obtain engineering internships, both in the United States and abroad. Study abroad is also encouraged, and the department has exchange programs with several universities around the world. These experiences help students to round out their education and to better prepare for careers in the increasingly global practice of engineering.

Graduate Study

The department offers work for the degrees of master of science and doctor of philosophy with major in mechanical engineering.The master of science degree may be earned with or without thesis. Although co-major and formal minor programs are not offered in mechanical engineering, courses may be used for minor work by students taking major work in other departments.

The graduate program offers advanced study in fluid mechanics, fluid power, controls, heat transfer, computer-aided design, machines and systems, materials and manufacturing processes, thermodynamics, energy utilization, virtual reality applications, micro-electro-mechanical systems, computational fluid dynamics, combustion, HVAC, IC engines, and radioactive waste management.

The department offers students the opportunity to broaden their education by participating in minor programs in established departments, interdepartmental programs, or other experiences as approved by their program of study committees.

The requirements for advanced degrees are established by the student's program of study committee within established guidelines of the Graduate College. Graduate students who have not completed an undergraduate program of study substantially equivalent to that required of undergraduate students in the department can expect that additional supporting coursework will be required. A foreign language requirement exists for the degree of doctor of philosophy only if the student's program of study committee deems it appropriate to a specific program of study.

Courses open for nonmajor graduate credit: All 300 and 400 level courses except 330, 396, 397, 398, 466, 490, and 498.

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

M E 102. Mechanical Engineering Orientation. Cr. R. F.S. (1-0) Information concerning university, college, and departmental policies and procedures. Information on cooperative, intern, summer and career placement. Review of degree audit and registration.

M E 190. Learning Communities. (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S. Enrollment in M E learning communities.

M E 202. Mechanical Engineering - Professional Planning. (1-0) Cr. R. F.S. Prereq: Sophomore classification. Preparation for a career in mechanical engineering; discussion of opportunities for leadership, undergraduate research, experiential learning.

M E 231. Engineering Thermodynamics I. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Math 265, Chem 167, Phys 222. Fundamental concepts based on zeroth, first and second laws of thermodynamics. Properties and processes for ideal gases and solid-liquid-vapor phases of pure substances. Applications to vapor power cycles. Credit for either M E 231 or 330, but not both, may be applied toward graduation.

M E 270. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Design. (1-6) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Engr 170, Phys 221. Introduction to fundamentals of mechanical engineering design with applications to thermal and mechanical systems. Examination of existing machines and systems. Team-based projects, open-ended problems and prototyping. Application of engineering tools. Oral and written reports required.

M E 280. Introduction to History of Science I. (Cross-listed with Hist). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Ideas of nature from ancient Greece to the seventeenth-century scientific revolution.

M E 281. Introduction to History of Science II. (Cross-listed with Hist). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Science from the seventeenth-century scientific revolution to Darwin and Einstein.

M E 284. Introduction to History of Technology and Engineering I. (Cross-listed with Hist). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Technology in various civilizations from Sumer and Egypt to early 18th century Europe.

M E 285. Introduction to History of Technology and Engineering II. (Cross-listed with Hist). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Technology in the Western world in nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

M E 298. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of department. First professional work period in the cooperative education program. Students must register for this course before commencing work.

M E 324. Manufacturing Engineering. (3-2) Cr. 4. F.S. Prereq: 270, Mat E 272, E M 324. Plastic deformation and work hardening. Manufacturing processes including forming, machining, casting and welding with emphasis on manufacturing considerations in design. Modern manufacturing practices. Laboratory exercises will be an integral component of the course. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 325. Machine Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Engr 170, E M 324, Stat 305. Philosophy of design and design methodology. Consideration of stresses and failure models useful for static and fatigue loading. Analysis, selection and synthesis of machine elements. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 330. Thermodynamics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Phys 222. For students electing one course in engineering thermodynamics. First and second laws of thermodynamics. Properties and processes for pure substances. Selected applications including cycles for power and refrigeration. Psychrometrics. Majors in mechanical engineering may not apply M E 330 toward a degree in mechanical engineering. Credit for either M E 231 or 330, but not both, may be applied toward graduation.

M E 332. Engineering Thermodynamics II. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 231. Gas power cycles. Fundamentals of gas mixtures, psychrometry, and thermochemistry. Applications to one-dimensional compressible flow, refrigeration, air conditioning and combustion processes. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 335. Fluid Flow. (3-2) Cr. 4. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 332, E M 345, Math 266 or 267, credit or enrollment in 370. Incompressible and compressible fluid flow fundamentals. Dimensional analysis and similitude. Internal and external flow applications. Lab experiments emphasizing concepts in thermodynamics and fluid flow. Written reports are required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 370. Engineering Measurements and Instrumentation. (2-3) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: E E 442, Stat 305. Fundamentals of design, selection, and operation of components of measuring systems. Measurement processes, data acquisition systems, analysis of data, and propagation of measurement uncertainty. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 396. Summer Internship. Cr. R. Repeatable. SS. Prereq: Permission of department and Engineering Career Services. Summer professional work period.

M E 397. Engineering Internship. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: Permission of department and Engineering Career Services. Professional work period, one semester maximum per academic year.

M E 398. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: 298, permission of department and Engineering Career Services. Second professional work period in the cooperative education program. Students must register for this course before commencing work.

M E 410. Mechanical Engineering Applications of Mechatronics. (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: E E 442, 448, credit or enrollment in 421. Fundamentals of sensor characterization, signal conditioning and motion control, coupled with concepts of embedded computer control. Digital and analog components used for interfacing with computer controlled systems. Mechanical system analysis combined with various control approaches. Focus on automation of hydraulic actuation processes. Laboratory experiences provide hands-on development of mechanical systems. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 411. Automatic Controls. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 421. Methods and principles of automatic control. Pneumatic, hydraulic, and electrical systems. Representative applications of automatic control systems. Mathematical analysis of control systems. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 412. Legal and Environmental Considerations in Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 325, senior classification in engineering. Failure modes associated with product environment. Interaction between the legal profession, legislative bodies, standards and the design engineer, using a case study approach in design applications. Litigation involving designs, standards, and laws applicable to specific designs surveyed. The influence of laws and standards upon design. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 413. Fluid Power Engineering. (Cross-listed with A E). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 335 or E M 378, A E 216 or M E 270. Properties of hydraulic fluids. Performance parameters of fixed and variable displacement pumps and motors. Hydraulic circuits and systems. Hydrostatic transmissions. Characteristics of control valves. Analysis and design of hydraulic systems for power and control functions. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 414. Hydraulic Systems and Control. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 421, 335. Characteristics of hydraulic motors and pumps, system components, system analysis, feedback control and stability, control circuits, computer simulation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 415. Mechanical Systems Design. (0-6) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 324, 325. Solution of a total design problem involving a mechanical system, documenting decisions concerning form and function, material specification, manufacturing methods, safety, cost, and conformance with codes and standards. Solution description includes oral and written reports. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 417. Advanced Machine Design I. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 325. Continuation of 325 involving some additional elements, alternative viewpoints, and computational considerations. Analysis, selection, synthesis, and redesign of machine elements using computer and CAD/CAM assistance. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 418. Mechanical Considerations in Robotics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 421. Three dimensional kinematics, dynamics, and control of robot manipulators, hardware elements and sensors. Laboratory experiments using industrial robots. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 419. Computer-Aided Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 325. Theory and applications of computer-aided design. Design theory, solid modeling and finite element modeling in CAD. Assembly modeling, rapid prototyping and mechanism analysis. Curves and surfaces and CAD/CAM data exchange. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 421. Mechanical Systems and Control. (3-2) Cr. 4. F.S. Prereq: E M 345, Math 267, E E 442, 448. Modeling and simulation of mechanical systems. Development of equations of motion and dynamic response characteristics. Fundamentals of classical control applications, including mathematical analysis and design for closed loop control systems. Introduction to computer interfacing for data acquisition and control. Laboratory exercises for hands-on motion and control implementation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 425. Mechanical System Optimization. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Engr 160. Mechanical system optimization techniques including unconstrained and constrained minimization and linear programming. Both the theory of the methods and the application to mechanical system design will be presented. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 431. Nuclear Radiation Theory and Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Phys 222, Math 266 or 267. Atomic and nuclear physics. Radioactivity and reaction rates. Cross sections. Introduction to neutron diffusion theory. Engineering applications of radiation theory. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 433. Alternative Energy Conversion. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 332. Basic principles, thermodynamics, and performance of alternative energy conversion technologies such as direct energy conversion (fuel cells, photovoltaics, magnetohydrodynamics), wind energy, biomass energy, non-combustion thermal sources (ocean gradients, geothermal and nuclear fusion), non-conventional environmental energy sources (ocean tides and currents), and finally other alternative approaches (molecular motors, cryo-engines, and solar sailing). Performance analysis and operating principles of systems and components, economic analysis for system design and operation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 436. Heat Transfer. (3-2) Cr. 4. F.S. Prereq: 335. Heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation. Similarity concepts in heat, mass, and momentum transfer. Methods for determination of heat transfer coefficients. Combined modes of heat transfer. Heat exchangers. Lab experiments emphasizing concepts in thermodynamics and heat transfer. Written reports are required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 441. Fundamentals of Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 436. Space conditioning and moist air processes. Application of thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid flow principles to the analysis of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning components and systems. Performance and specification of components and systems. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 442. Heating and Air Conditioning Design. (1-5) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 441. Design criteria and assessment of building environment and energy requirements. Design of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems. System control and economic analysis. Oral and written reports required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 443. Compressed Air Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 332. Basic principles, thermodynamics, and performance of compressed air systems including various components such as compressors, (recriprocating, rotary, centrifugal, and axial), prime movers, coolers, intercoolers, aftercoolers, dryers, heat recovery receivers, separators, filters, regulators, fault detectors, controllers, etc., performance analysis and operating principles for both systems and components, energy consumption and economic analysis for system design and operation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 444. Elements and Performance of Power Plants. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 332, credit or enrollment in 335. Basic principles, thermodynamics, engineering analysis of power plant systems. Topics include existing power plant technologies, the advanced energyplex systems of the future, societal impacts of power production, and environmental and regulatory concerns. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 446. Power Plant Design. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 332, credit or enrollment in 335. Design of a power plant to meet regulatory, cost, fuel, and output needs. Selection and synthesis of principal components. Oral and written reports required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 448. Fluid Dynamics of Turbomachinery. (Cross-listed with Aer E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: M E 335 or equivalent. Applications of principles of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics in performance analysis and design of turbomachines and related fluid system components. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 449. Internal Combustion Engine Design. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 335. Basic principles, thermodynamics, combustion, and exhaust emissions of spark ignition and compression ignition engines. Laboratory determination of fuel properties and engine performance. Thermodynamic and mechanical design of engine components to meet specified requirements. Oral and written reports required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 451. Engineering Acoustics. (Cross-listed with E M). (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Phys 221 and Math 266 or 267. Sound sources and propagation. Noise standards and effects of noise on people. Principles of noise and vibration control used in architectural and engineering design. Characteristics of basic noise measurement equipment. Experience in use of noise measuring equipment, sound power measurements, techniques for performing noise surveys, evaluation of various noise abatement techniques applied to common noise sources. Selected laboratory experiments. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 466. Multidisciplinary Engineering Design. (Cross-listed with Cpr E, E E, I E, Mat E). (1-4) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: Student must be within two semesters of graduation and permission of instructor. Application of team design concepts to projects of a multidisciplinary nature. Concurrent treatment of design, manufacturing and life cycle considerations. Application of design tools such as CAD, CAM and FEM. Design methodologies, project scheduling, cost estimating, quality control, manufacturing processes. Development of a prototype and appropriate documentation in the form of written reports, oral presentations, computer models and engineering drawings.

M E 475. Modeling and Simulation. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 421, credit or enrollment in 436. Introduction to computer solution techniques required to simulate flow, thermal, and mechanical systems. Methods of solving ordinary and partial differential equations and systems of algebraic equations; interpolation, numerical integration; finite difference and finite element methods. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 484. Technology, Globalization and Culture. (Dual-listed with 584). (Cross-listed with WLC). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: senior classification for 484; graduate classification for 584. Cross-disciplinary examination of the present and future impact of globalization with a focus on preparing students for leadership roles in diverse professional, social, and cultural contexts. Facilitate an understanding of the threats and opportunities inherent in the globalization process as they are perceived by practicing professionals and articulated in debates on globalization. Use of a digital forum for presenting and analyzing globalization issues by on-campus and off-campus specialists.

M E 488. History of American Technology. (Cross-listed with Hist). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Sophomore classification. Technology in America from Industrial Revolution to present. Themes include social contexts of technological change, development of professional engineering, ideas about technology and American life. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 489. History of American Science. (Cross-listed with Hist). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Sophomore classification. Science as a cultural and social activity in America from the eighteenth century to present. Scientific discovery; interaction of scientific and social ideas; science and war; science and health, environment; role of science as expertise in a nationalistic democrary. Nonmajor graduate credit.

M E 490. Independent Study. Cr. 1-6. Repeatable. Prereq: Senior classification. Investigation of topics holding special interest of students and faculty. Election of course and topic must be approved in advance by supervising faculty.
C. Engineering Measurements and Instrumentation
D. Heat Transfer
E. Fluid Power and Controls
F. Machines and Systems
G. Materials and Manufacturing Processes
H. Honors
J. Thermodynamics and Energy Utilization
K. Fluid Mechanics
L. Turbomachinery
M. Nuclear Engineering
N. CAD/CAM

M E 498. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: 298, permission of department and Engineering Career Services. Third and subsequent professional work periods in the cooperative education program. Students must register for this course before commencing work.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

M E 511. Advanced Control Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 411. Application of control design methods using continuous, discrete, and frequency-based models. Approaches include classical, pole assignment, model reference, internal model, and adaptive control methods. Mechanical design projects.

M E 520. Material and Manufacturing Considerations in Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 324, 325. Advanced treatment of materials and manufacturing. Applications to design. Design and redesign to facilitate cost-effective manufacturing. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons of designs. Economic considerations.

M E 521. Mechanical Behavior and Manufacturing of Polymers and Composites. (Cross-listed with M S E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 324 or Mat E 272 and E M 324. Effect of chemical structure and morphology on properties. Linear viscoelasticity, damping and stress relaxation phenomena. Structure and mechanics of filler and fiber reinforced composites. Mechanical properties and failure mechanisms. Material selection and designing with polymers. Processing of polymer and composite parts.

M E 527. Mechanics of Machining and Finishing Processes. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 324. Mechanics of material removal for ductile materials. Shear zone theory. Oblique cutting. Heat transfer in machining. Milling and grinding. Mechanics of material removal for brittle materials. Optimal selection and design of cutting parameters. Control of machining processes. Principles of precision finishing. Design considerations for machining and finishing processes.

M E 528. Micro/Nanomanufacturing. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 324. Introduction and scaling laws; SEM/SPM/AFM microscopes; top-down-beam machining; top-down-mechanical and electrical machining; synthesis of powders, tubes, and wires; bottom-up molecular manufacturing; applications of molecular manufacturing.

M E 530. Advanced Thermodynamics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 332. Fundamentals of thermodynamics from the classical viewpoint with emphasis on the use of the first and second laws for analysis of thermal systems. Generalized thermodynamic relationships. Computer applications of thermodynamic properties and system analysis. Selected topics.

M E 532. Compressible Fluid Flow. (Cross-listed with Aer E). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: M E 335 or Aer E 541. Thermodynamics of compressible flow. Viscous and inviscid compressible flow equations. One dimensional steady flow; isentropic flow, normal shock waves oblique and curved shocks, constant area flow with friction and heat transfer. Linear theory and Prandtl-Glauert similarity. Method of characteristics. Subsonic, transonic, supersonic and hypersonic flows.

M E 536. Advanced Heat Transfer. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 436. Advanced treatment of heat transmission by conduction, convection, and radiation.

M E 538. Advanced Fluid Flow. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 436. Detailed analysis of incompressible/compressible, viscous/inviscid, laminar/turbulent, and developing fluid flows on a particle/point control volume basis.

M E 539. Fluidized Bed Processes. (Cross-listed with Ch E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 436 or Ch E 357. Mass, momentum, and energy balances applied to fluidized beds. Hydrodynamics of bubbling, turbulent, and fast fluidized beds. Heat and mass transfer. Thermal and chemical processes in fluidized beds. Applications.

M E 540. Solar Energy Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 436. Application of heat transfer, thermodynamics and photovoltaics to the design and analysis of solar energy collectors and systems.

M E 542. Advanced Combustion. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 332 or Ch E 381. Thermochemistry and transport theory applied to combustion. Gas phase equilibrium. Energy balances. Reaction kinetics. Flame temperatures, speed, ignition, and extinction. Premixed and diffusion flames. Combustion aerodynamics. Mechanisms of air pollution.

M E 543. Introduction to Random Vibrations and Nonlinear Dynamics. (Cross-listed with E M). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: E M 444. Vibrations of continuous systems. Nonlinear vibration phenomena, perturbation expansions; methods of multiple time scales and slowly-varying amplitude and phase. Characteristics of random vibrations; random processes, probability distributions, spectral density and its significance, the normal or Gaussian random process. Transmission of random vibration, response of simple single and two-degree-of-freedom systems to stationary random excitation. Fatigue failure due to random excitation.

M E 545. Thermal Systems Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 436. Integrating thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer to model thermal equipment and to simulate thermal systems. Second law and parametric analysis; cost estimation, life cycle analysis and optimization.

M E 546. Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer I. (Cross-listed with Aer E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 538 or Aer E 541. Introduction to finite difference and finite volume methods used in modern engineering. Basic concepts of discretization, consistency, and stability. Applications of numerical methods to selected model partial differential equations.

M E 547. Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer II. (Cross-listed with Aer E). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: M E 546. Application of computational methods to current problems in fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Methods for solving the Navier-Stokes and reduced equation sets such as the Euler, boundary layer, and parabolized forms of the conservation equations. Introduction to relevant aspects of grid generation and turbulence modeling.

M E 549. Vehicle Dynamics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: E M 345, Math 266 or 267. Analysis and evaluation of the performance of cars and trucks. Computer simulation of ride, braking, and directional reponse.

M E 552. Advanced Acoustics. (Cross-listed with E M). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 451. Theoretical acoustics: wave propagation in fluids; acoustic radiation, diffraction and scattering; and architectural acoustics. Applications of basic acoustic theory in noise control and acoustic radiation. Introduction to selected numerical methods in acoustics.

M E 557. Computer Graphics and Geometric Modeling. (Cross-listed with Cpr E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 421, programming experience in C. Fundamentals of computer graphics technology. Data structures. Parametric curve and surface modeling. Solid model representations. Applications in engineering design, analysis, and manufacturing.

M E 564. Fracture and Fatigue. (Cross-listed with E M, M S E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: E M 324 and either Mat E 211 or 272. Undergraduates: Permisison of instructor. Materials and mechanics approach to fracture and fatigue. Fracture mechanics, brittle and ductile fracture, fracture and fatigue characteristics, fracture of thin films and layered structures. Fracture and fatigue tests, mechanics and materials designed to avoid fracture or fatigue.

M E 573. Random Signal Analysis and Kalman Filtering. (Cross-listed with Aer E, E E, MAth). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: E E 324 or Aer E 331 or M E 370 or 411 or Math 341 or 395. Elementary notions of probability. Random processes. Autocorrelation and spectral functions. Estimation of spectrum from finite data. Response of linear systems to random inputs. Discrete and continuous Kalman filter theory and applications. Smoothing and prediction. Linearization of nonlinear dynamics.

M E 574. Optimal Control. (Cross-listed with Aer E, E E, MAth). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: E E 577. The optimal control problem. Variational approach. Pontryagin's principle. Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Dynamic programming. Time-optimal, minimum fuel, minimum energy control systems. The regulator problem. Structures and properties of optimal controls.

M E 575. Introduction to Robust Control. (Cross-listed with Aer E, E E, MAth). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: E E 577. Introduction to modern robust control. Model and signal uncertainty in control systems. Uncertainty description. Stability and performance robustness to uncertainty. Solutions to the H2, Hoo, and l1 control problems. Tools for robustness analysis and synthesis.

M E 576. Digital Feedback Control Systems. (Cross-listed with Aer E, E E, MAth). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: E E 475 or Aer E 432 or M E 411 or 414 or Math 415; and Math 267. Sampled data, discrete data, and the z-transform. Design of digital control systems using transform methods; root locus, frequency response and direct design methods. Design using state-space methods. Controllability, observability, pole placement, state estimators. Digital filters in control systems. Microcomputer implementation of digital filters. Finite wordlength effects. Linear quadratic optimal control in digital control systems. Simulation of digital control systems.

M E 577. Linear Systems. (Cross-listed with Aer E, E E, MAth). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: E E 324 or Aer E 331 or M E 414 or Math 415; and Math 307. State variable and input-output descriptions of linear continuous-time and discrete-time systems. Solution of linear dynamical equations. Controllability and observability of linear dynamical systems. Canonical descriptions of linear equations. Irreducible realizations of rational transfer function matrices. Canonical form dynamical equations. State feedback. State estimators. Decoupling by state feedback. Design of feedback systems. Stability of linear dynamical systems.

M E 578. Nonlinear Systems. (Cross-listed with Aer E, E E, MAth). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: E E 577. Classification of nonlinear control systems. Existence and uniqueness of solutions. Approximate analysis methods. Periodic orbits. Concept of stability and Lyapunov stability theory. Absolute stability of feedback systems. Input-output stability. Passivity.

M E 584. Technology, Globalization and Culture. (Dual-listed with 484). (Cross-listed with WLC). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: senior classification for 484; graduate classification for 584. Cross-disciplinary examination of the present and future impact of globalization with a focus on preparing students for leadership roles in diverse professional, social, and cultural contexts. Facilitate an understanding of the threats and opportunities inherent in the globalization process as they are perceived by practicing professionals and articulated in debates on globalization. Use of a digital forum for presenting and analyzing globalization issues by on-campus and off-campus specialists.

M E 590. Special Topics. Cr. 1-8. Repeatable.
A. Experimental Gas Dynamics
B. Fluid Mechanics
C. Heat Transfer
D. Thermodynamics and Energy Utilization
E. Turbomachinery
F. Vehicular Propulsion Systems
G. Advanced Machine Design
I. Automatic Controls
J. Operating and Environmental Considerations in Design
K. Mechanical Behavior of Materials
L. Manufacturing Processes
M. Tribology
N. Sensitivity Methods
O. Engineering Computation
P. Engineering Measurements and Instrumentation
Q. Independent Literature Investigation
R. Nuclear Engineering
S. CAD/CAM

M E 599. Creative Component. Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Courses primarily for graduate students

M E 600. Seminar. Cr. R. Repeatable. (1-0)

M E 625. Surface Modeling. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 557, programming experience in C. Theory and implementation of contemporary parametric sculptured surface modeling technology. Non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) curves and surfaces. Fundamental computational algorithms. Construction techniques. Advanced modeling topics. Computer projects.

M E 632. Multiphase Flow. (Cross-listed with Ch E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 538. Single particle, mutliparticle and two-phase fluid flow phenomena (gas-solid, liquid-solid and gas-liquid mixtures); particle interactions, transport phenomena, wall effects; bubbles, equations of multiphase flow. Dense phase (fluidized and packed beds) and ducted flows; momentum, heat and mass transfer. Computer solutions.

M E 636. Conduction Heat Transfer. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 436. Techniques for analysis of problems involving steady-state and transient heat conduction in solids.

M E 637. Convection Heat Transfer. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 436. Heat transfer to internal or external forced convection flows under laminar or turbulent conditions. Free convection. Heat exchanger design considerations, including augmentation.

M E 638. Radiation Heat Transfer. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 436. Techniques for analysis of radiation in enclosures. Radiative properties of surfaces. Radiative transfer in participating media. Combined modes of transfer. Approximate methods of analysis.

M E 639. Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 436. Hydrodynamics of adiabatic two-phase flow. Pool boiling. Forced convection, boiling, and condensation. Dynamic behavior of two-phase systems. Augmentation of boiling and condensing heat transfer. Applications in the power and process industries.

M E 647. Advanced High Speed Computational Fluid Dynamics. (Cross-listed with Aer E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 547. An examination of current methods in computational fluid dynamics. Differencing strategies. Advanced solution algorithms. Grid generation. Construction of complex CFD algorithms. Current applications. Use of state of the art CFD codes.

M E 690. Advanced Topics. Cr. arr. Repeatable. Investigation of advanced topics of special interest to graduate students in mechanical engineering.
A. Experimental Gas Dynamics
B. Fluid Mechanics
C. Heat Transfer
D. Thermodynamics and Energy Utilization
E. Turbomachinery
F. Vehicular Propulsion Systems
G. Advanced Machine Design
I. Automatic Controls
J. Operating and Environmental Considerations in Design
K. Mechanical Behavior of Materials
L. Manufacturing Processes
M. Tribology
N. Sensitivity Methods
O. Engineering Computation
P. Engineering Measurements and Instrumentation
Q. Independent Literature Investigation
R. Nuclear Engineering
S. CAD/CAM

M E 697. Engineering Internship. Cr. R. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of Director of Graduate Education, graduate classification. One semester and one summer maximum per academic year professional work period. Satisfactory-fail only.

M E 699. Research. Cr. arr. Repeatable. Satisfactory-fail only.