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Iowa State University

2007-2009 Courses and Programs

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Entomology (Ent)

200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses | www.ent.iastate.edu

Jon Tollefson, Chair of Department
University Professors (Emeritus): Pedigo
Professors: Bonning, Coats, Dewitt, Jurenka, D. Lewis, Rice, Tollefson, Wintersteen
Professors (Emeritus): Guthrie, Hart, Krafsur, R. Lewis, Mutchmor, Rowley, Showers
Professors (Collaborators): Enan, L. Lewis
Associate Professors: Beetham, Courtney, Holscher
Assistant Professors: Bartholomay, Oneal
Assistant Professors (Adjunct): Harris, Vandyk
Assistant Professors (Collaborators): Cosse, Hellmich, Sappington, Sumerford
Lecturers: Pilcher

Undergraduate Study

For undergraduate curriculum in entomology, see College of Agriculture, Curricula.

The undergraduate curriculum in entomology is designed for persons interested in studying insects, their adaptations, and the practicalities of dealing with them. Students electing entomology as a major will prepare themselves for positions in industry, business, government, education, and public health. Graduates may acquire positions in research, development, and technical sales for agricultural, chemical and seed companies. State and federal agencies employ entomologists as consultants, extension directors, mosquito abatement agents, inspectors, and research aides. Entomologists may also find employment with urban or agricultural pest-management or consulting firms, large private farms and ranches, and horticultural nurseries.

All graduates understand the principles of insect structure and function. They understand the evolutionary and ecological relationships of insects with other life forms, and the impact of insects relative to human and animal health, as well as the relationships between insects and humanity's food, fiber, structural, and aesthetic needs and expectations. Graduates understand the principles and methods available to manage beneficial and pest insect populations. They are skilled in identifying insects and related groups and understand the biology, ecology, behavior, diversity, and evolutionary relationships of the major groups of insects. They understand the application of the scientific method in problem solving and the principles of experimental design and analysis. Graduates are able to communicate research and educational materials properly and competently - orally, visually, and in writing - and are able to work effectively with others.

Graduates of the agricultural and horticultural insect management option are skilled in determining pest levels and impact on plant and animal hosts, and the management of these pests. They understand the environmental, legal, and ethical issues involved in insect population management.

Graduates of the insect biology option have achieved an understanding of the biochemical and physiological processes governing insect metabolism, growth, and form. They understand the evolutionary and ecological significance of insects. They also have a broad background in the biological sciences. Graduates of this option are prepared to enter graduate or professional schools.

The department work for a minor in entomology that may be earned by completing 370 and 12 credits in courses selected from an approved list supplied by the department.

Entomology administers the Emerging Global Diseases minor, which may be earned by completion of at least 15 credits in related courses taken at ISU. Core courses address issues important to the field, including molecular and cellular mechanisms of pathogen-host interaction, cultural and geographic differences that affect disease control, and the effects of international trade on animal and human disease. The following courses must be taken for a minor (3 courses): Anthr 439, Micro 310 or Zool 311, Ent 374 or Ent 574. The remainder of the credits may be selected from any of the above-listed courses not selected, and from other appropriate courses as approved by Emerging Global Diseases program advisers (see www.ent.iastate.edu/dept/undergrad/egd ).

A preveterinary program is available in entomology.

Graduate Study

The department offers work for the master of science and doctor of philosophy degrees with a major in entomology. Studies at the Ecosystem, Organismal, and Subcellar levels occur in the following areas: aquatic entomology, biological control, chemical ecology, ecology, host plant resistance, insecticide toxicology, medical/veterinary entomology, pathology, pest management, physiology, population genetics, or systematics.

Graduates have a broad understanding of entomology and related disciplines, and an in-depth command of their area of concentration. They are able to communicate effectively with scientific colleagues and the general public in both formal and informal settings. Graduates are able to address complex problems facing entomology or toxicology professionals, taking into account related ethical, social, legal, economic, and environmental issues. They are skilled in research methods, data analyses, and interpretation of results. They also are skilled in working effectively with their colleagues, and writing concise and persuasive grant proposals. They have an understanding of and can critically evaluate current entomological literature.

Prerequisite to the entomology major and to minor graduate work in the department is completion of at least two years of zoological courses, for part of which credit in other closely allied biological sciences may be substituted. Specific course requirements for advanced degrees depend partly upon previous training and experience in the major field of specialization.

Any student receiving the M.S. in entomology shall have at least one course in insect physiology, one course in insect systematics, two courses of Ent 590 (selected from topics A through D, F through I, M and N, inclusive), and at least 1 credit of Ent 600. Any student receiving the Ph.D. in entomology shall have at least one course in insect physiology, one course in insect systematics, four additional courses of Ent 590 (selected from topics A through D and F through I, M through N inclusive), and at least 1 credit of Ent 600. At least one 590 must be taken from each of these subgroups: Population (C, D, N); Organismal (A, B, F, M); and Suborganismal (G, H, I). In addition, Ph.D. students majoring either in Entomology or Toxicology shall have two semesters of teaching experience, taken as Ent 590K both semesters or Ent 590K one semester and Ent 590L the other semester.

A student can receive a Ph.D. minor in Entomology by taking 3 Entomology courses (500 level and above) for a total of 9 credits to be determined by the student's POS committee and approved by the Entomology Director of Graduate Education.

An option for an emphasis in molecular Entomology is available. Any student receiving the M.S. in entomology with an emphasis in molecular entomology is required to take Ent 555, Ent 590G, plus one other course of Ent 590 (selected from topics A through D, F, H, I, M, N), one additional course in molecular entomology, Ent 600 Seminar, BBMB 404, BBMB 542A, and one course from the following: Ent 576, Ent 525, or Ent 568.

Any student receiving the Ph.D. in entomology with an emphasis in molecular entomology is required to take Ent 555, Ent 590G, plus three other courses of Ent 590 (selected from topics A through D, F, H, I, M, N), one additional course in molecular entomology, Ent 600 Seminar, BBMB 542A, plus two other workshops selected from BBMB 542 B through E, an additional course with a molecular component, and one from each of the following two categories: Systematics (Ent 576, Ent 525, Ent 568), Biochemistry (BBMB 404, BBMB 405, BBMB 501).

Entomology participates in the interdepartmental majors in ecology and evolutionary biology; genetics; microbiology; and molecular, cellular and developmental biology; and in the interdepartmental major and minor in toxicology (see Index).

The Federal Corn Insects and Crop Genetics Research Unit and the North Central Plant Introduction Station are available for advanced study in certain phases of entomological research.

More information about the department, such as current research, faculty resumes, physical facilities, and graduate students can be viewed on the department's website at www.ent.iastate.edu .

Courses open for nonmajor graduate credit: 370, 372, 374, 376, 386, 483, 493.

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

Ent 110. Technical Lecture. Cr. R. F. Orientation to areas of and opportunities in entomology.

Ent 201. Introduction to Insects. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S.SS. 5 weeks. S. Classroom section spring only. World Wide Web section of course offered summer and fall semesters. VanDyk. Biological and ecological aspects of insects.

Ent 211. Insects and Society. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: 201. 11 weeks. Classroom section spring only. World Wide Web section offered fall and spring semesters. Holscher, Van Dyk. The importance of insects in human well-being. Insect-human interactions. Primarily for nonscience and nonagriculture majors.

Ent 283. Pesticide Application Certification. (Cross-listed with Agron, For, Hort). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Holscher. Core background and specialty topics in agricultural, and horticultural pesticide applicator certification. Students can select certification categories and have the opportunity to obtain pesticide applicator certification at the completion of the course. Commercial pesticide applicator certification is emphasized.

Ent 311. Bugs in the Classroom. (2-3) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Sophomore classification. Introduction to insect biology for elementary and secondary education majors. Emphasis on insect ecology, classroom rearing, and web-based resources. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ent 360. Insect Behavior. (Dual-listed with 560). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Biol 212. The mechanisms underlying the behavior of insects; emphasis on neuroethological and evolutionary bases of insect orientation, reproduction, feeding, oviposition, defense, learning, and sociality.

Ent 370. Insect Biology. (2-3) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Biol 101 or 211. Jurenka. Structure, physiology, evolution, behavior, life histories, and recognition of insects. Collection required. Voluntary field trips. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ent 371I. Introduction to Insect Ecology. (Cross-listed with Ia LL). (3-3) Cr. 4. Alt. SS., offered 2009. Field and laboratory study of insects, their diversity, life history; emphasis on ecology and behavior.

Ent 372. Livestock Entomology. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2009. Classroom and off-campus videotape sections. 12 weeks. Holscher. Recognition, biology, behavior, economic importance, and management of insects and other arthropods affecting livestock and poultry production. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ent 374. Insects and Our Health. (Cross-listed with Micro). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 3 credits in biological sciences. Bartholomay. Identification, biology, and significance of insects and arthropods that affect the health of humans and animals, particularly those that are vectors of disease. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ent 375. Plant Protection Using Natural Enemies. (Dual-listed with 575). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 370 or 376. Bonning, Harris. Overview of the biology, ecology, and classification of insect pathogens, predators, and parasitoids. Discussion of the use of these organisms in plant protection, including an emphasis on genetic alteration of natural enemies. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ent 376. Fundamentals of Entomology and Pest Management. (2-3) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Biol 101 or 211. Tollefson, O'Neal. Introduction to entomology and insect-pest management, including life processes, ecology, economics, tactics of population suppression, and ecological backlash. Credit for either Ent 376 or 386, but not both, may be applied toward graduation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ent 386. Management of Insect Pests. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: Biol 101 or 211. Tollefson. Introduction to insects and their lifestyles. Theory and application of pest-management practices. Examples drawn primarily from field crops. Credit for either Ent 376 or 386, but not both, may be applied for graduation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ent 425. Aquatic Insects. (Dual-listed with 525). (Cross-listed with A Ecl). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: Biol 312 or equivalent. Courtney. Morphology, ecology, diversity, and significance of aquatic insects, with emphasis on the collection, curation and identification of taxa in local streams and lakes.

Ent 452. Integrated Management of Diseases and Insect Pests of Turfgrasses. (Dual-listed with 552). (Cross-listed with Pl P, Hort). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: Hort 351. Gleason, D. Lewis. Identification and biology of important diseases and insect pests of turfgrasses. Development of integrated pest management programs in various turfgrass environments.

Ent 471. Insect Ecology. (Dual-listed with 571). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 9 credits biological sciences. O'Neal. The contribution of insects to ecosystem function is staggering. This course will focus on insect population ecology, predator-prey interaction and chemical ecology. The role of insects in nutrient cycling, pollination and pest management will be discussed with case studies used to highlight the applied nature of insect ecology and its relationship to agriculture.

Ent 478. Global Protozoology - Molecular Biology of Protozoa. (Dual-listed with 578). (Cross-listed with V Pth). (2-1) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Analysis of cellular systems, molecules, and organelles of pathogenic protozoan parasites. Emphasis is placed on processes and systems that are unique to protozoa, are important to understanding vector-parasite-host biology/ecology, or are targets of disease prevention/treatment programs for international disease control. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ent 490. Independent Study. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. Prereq: 15 credits in biological sciences, junior or senior classification. A maximum of 6 credits of Ent 490 may be used toward the total of 128 credits required for graduation.
E. Research or work experience.
U. Laboratory teaching experience. For students registering to be undergraduate laboratory assistants.

Ent 493. Workshop on Insect Management. Cr. 1. SS. Prereq: 370, 372, 376, or 386. Tollefson, Holscher. Insect recognition and sampling will be practiced in agricultural systems. The applications of current pest management practices will be demonstrated in both crop and livestock systems. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

Ent 511. Integrated Management of Tropical Crops. (Cross-listed with Pl P, Hort). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: PL P 408 or 416 or Ent 370 or 376 or Hort 221. Gleason, Lewis, Nonnecke. Applications of Integrated Crop Management principles (including plant pathology, entomology, and horticulture) to tropical cropping systems. Familiarization with a variety of tropical agroecosystems and Costa Rican culture is followed by 10-day tour of Costa Rican agriculture during spring break, then writeup of individual projects. Tour expenses paid by students.

Ent 525. Aquatic Insects. (Dual-listed with 425). (Cross-listed with A Ecl). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: Biol 312 or equivalent. Courtney. Morphology, ecology, diversity and significance of aquatic insects, with emphasis on the collection, curation and identification of taxa in local streams and lakes.

Ent 530. Ecologically Based Pest Management Strategies. (Cross-listed with Agron, Pl P, SusAg). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: SusAg 509. Durable, least-toxic strategies for managing weeds, pathogens, and insect pests, with emphasis on underlying ecological processes.

Ent 550. Pesticides in the Environment. (Cross-listed with Tox). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: 9 credits of biological sciences. Coats. Fate and significance of pesticides in soil, water, plants, animals, and the atmosphere.

Ent 552. Integrated Management of Diseases and Insect Pests of Turfgrasses. (Dual-listed with 452). (Cross-listed with Pl P, Hort). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: Hort 351. Gleason, D. Lewis. Identification and biology of important diseases and insect pests of turfgrasses. Development of integrated pest management programs in various turfgrass environments.

Ent 555. Insect Physiology. (3-3) Cr. 4. S. Prereq: 370. Jurenka. Life processes of the insects, including reviews of current problems in insect physiology.

Ent 560. Insect Behavior. (Dual-listed with 360). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Biol 212. The mechanisms underlying the behavior of insects; emphasis on neuroethological and evolutionary bases of insect orientation, reproduction, feeding, oviposition, defense, learning, and sociality.

Ent 568. Advanced Systematics. (Cross-listed with EEOB). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Principles and practice of systematic biology; taxonomy, nomenclature and classification of plants and animals; sources and interpretation of systematic data; speciation; fundamentals of phylogenetic systematics.

Ent 570. Host Plant Resistance to Insects. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 370 or 376. Tollefson. Principles of insect and host interactions and mechanisms of insect control by host plant resistance.

Ent 571. Insect Ecology. (Dual-listed with 471). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 9 credits biological sciences. O'Neal. The contribution of insects to ecosystem function is staggering. This course will focus on insect population ecology, predator-prey interaction and chemical ecology. The role of insects in nutrient cycling, pollination and pest management will be discussed with case studies used to highlight the applied nature of insect ecology and its relationship to agriculture.

Ent 573. Advanced Insect Pest Management. (3-3) Cr. 4. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 370. Tollefson. Contemporary concepts of insect biology and applications of insect population management.

Ent 574. Medical Entomology. (3-3) Cr. 4. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 9 credits in biological sciences. Bartholomay. Identification, biology, and significance of insects and other arthropods that attack people and animals, particularly those that are vectors of disease.

Ent 575. Plant Protection Using Natural Enemies. (Dual-listed with 375). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 370 or 376. Bonning, Harris. Overview of the biology, ecology, and classification of insect pathogens, predators, and parasitoids. Discussion of the use of these organisms in plant protection, including an emphasis on genetic alteration of natural enemies.

Ent 576. Systematic Entomology. (3-6) Cr. 5. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 370. Courtney. Classification, distribution, and natural history of insects, including fundamentals of phylogenetic systematics, biogeography, taxonomic procedures, and insect collection and curation.

Ent 578. Global Protozoology - Molecular Biology of Protozoa. (Dual-listed with 478). (Cross-listed with V Pth). (2-1) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Analysis of cellular systems, molecules, and organelles of pathogenic protozoan parasites. Emphasis is placed on processes and systems that are unique to protozoa, are important to understanding vector-parasite-host biology/ecology, or are targets of disease prevention/treatment programs for international disease control.

Ent 590. Special Topics. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. Prereq: 15 credits in biological sciences..
A. Biological Control and Pathology.
B. Chemical Ecology and Behavior.
C. Ecology and Pest Management.
D. Evolution and Systematics.
E. Special Research Topics.
F. Medical and Veterinary Entomology.
G. Molecular Entomology.
H. Physiology and Biochemistry.
I. Toxicology.
K. Teaching Experience.
L. Extension Internship.
M. Immature Insects.
N. Population Genetics.

Courses for graduate students

Ent 600. Seminar. Cr. 1. F.S.SS. Presentation of research results.

Ent 675. Insecticide Toxicology. (Cross-listed with Tox). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 555 or Tox 501. Coats. Principles of insecticide toxicology; classification, mode of action, metabolism, and environmental effects of insecticides.

Ent 699. Research. Cr. arr. Repeatable.