Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2007-2009 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

Search for classes offered this term

Catalog Index

A| B| C | D| E| F| G| H| I | J| K| L| M| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z

English (Engl)

200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses | www.engl.iastate.edu/

Charles Kostelnick, Chair of Department
Distinguished Professors: Bowers, Swander
University Professors: Burnett, Daly, Nakadate
Professors: Carlson, Chapelle, Dearin, Douglas, Ewald, Freed, Graham, Hickok, Kienzler, Kostelnick, Mendelson, Owen, Poague, Russell, Tremmel, Vann, Winsor, Zimmerman
Professors (Emeritus): Abraham, Anderson-Hsieh, Bataille, Blyler, David, Geha, Haggard, Herrnstadt, McCarthy, Nostwich, Potter, Silet, Underhill, Wilson, Zbaracki
Associate Professors: Consigny, Davis, Goodwin, Haas, Hagge, Hegelheimer, Herndl, Honeycutt, Kupfer, Larson, Laware, Levis, Marquart, Niday, Payne, Pett, Post, Price-Herndl, Redmond, Roberts, Schwarte, Slagell, Yager
Professors (Emeritus): Galyon, Gwiasda, Matthies, Ross, Whitaker
Assistant Professors: Cortes, Duffelmeyer, Haji-Abdolhosseini, Licona, Michie, Mielke, Sauer, Shenk, Socolovsky, Winkiel, Zimmerman
Assistant Professors (Emeritus): Kaufmann, Mccully, Vallier
Assistant Professors (Adjunct): Betcher, Vrchota
Instructors (Adjunct): Barratt, Hagge, Langenberg, Mahoney, Myers, Noland, Schmidt
Senior Lecturers: Benner, Clarke, Demaray, DeWall, Gilchrist, Liebich, Messenger, Minkler, Ringlee, Schabel, Tremmel, Vandervalk

Undergraduate Study

The department offers a wide variety of courses for students seeking a degree in English or Technical Communication, as well as for students wishing to broaden their general education. Offerings include classes in introductory college writing, literature, film, creative writing, rhetoric and professional communication, technical communication, English education, linguistics, and teaching English as a second language/applied linguistics.

The discipline of English helps to develop students' understanding of how language functions in literature, mass media, and both personal and professional writing. Students not pursuing an English or Technical Communication major may select English courses to fill electives, to pursue a minor, or to complement their training in other majors.

Graduates majoring in English will possess a broad-based knowledge and understanding of the discipline. They will also understand their particular disciplinary specialization whether it be literary studies, rhetorical studies, teacher education, creative writing, or teaching English as a second language/applied linguistics. Graduates in Technical Communication will learn how to communicate scientific and technical information through coursework both in English and in scientific and technical fields. Graduates in either major will be able to write well-organized, well-reasoned essays that demonstrate their ability to read and think critically.

Introductory writing courses in the department are designed to improve the skills in communication and reading comprehension necessary for successful university work.

Through the Intensive English and Orientation Program, the department offers special courses in English for both undergraduate and graduate students who are native speakers of other languages. (See catalog entries under English Courses for Native Speakers of Other Languages and English Requirement for International Students.)

Careers for English Majors

Students who graduate with a major in English often enter fields that require special communication skills, such as publishing, public service, research, business and technical writing, or human resources. An undergraduate major in English can be a solid basis for the professional study of law, medicine, theology, or business management. Students in English Education can qualify to teach English in middle or high school. (See Index, Teacher Education.) English majors may also pursue graduate studies in a number of communication-related fields.

Careers for Technical Communication Majors

Students who graduate with a major in Technical Communication will be prepared for careers in scientific and technical writing and editing. They will typically seek positions in companies or nonprofit organizations; in communication-based units of local, state, and federal government; in the documentation units of software developers or publishers; or in such areas as web design and communication consulting. Technical Communication majors may also pursue graduate study in rhetoric and professional communication or other communication-related fields.

English Major Requirements

English majors choose one of three programs of study: Literary Studies, Rhetorical Studies, or English Education. Students interested in creative writing typically choose Literary Studies as a program of study. English majors are required to have, in addition to ISUComm foundation courses, at least 39 credits in English; those in English Education must have 48 credits in English in addition to required teaching-related courses taken in other departments. English majors transferring from other institutions must take at least 18 of their credits in English while in residence at Iowa State.

To graduate with a major in the English Department, a student must earn at least a C (not a C-) in English 150 and 250 as well as in each of the courses taken to fulfill the program of study. Earning at least a C in ISUComm foundation courses and in one advanced communication course also meets the departmental Communication Proficiency requirement.

Finally, all English majors must take at least one pre-1800 literature course and one pre-1900 literature course.

Distributed Requirements

All English majors, no matter what their program of study, must take nine courses for a total of 27 credits from a list of distributed requirements:

Engl 199 Introduction to the Study of English R
Engl 220 Descriptive English Grammar 3
Engl 260 Introduction to Literary Study 3
Engl 310 Rhetorical Analysis 3
Engl 302-309, 313-316 Advanced Communication 3
Engl 340-349 Women's or Multicultural Literature 3
Engl 360-364 American Literature 6
Engl 373-378 British Literature 6
Engl 497 Graduating Senior Assessment R
27

These distributed requirements may not overlap with any Advanced Study requirements.

Advanced Study Requirements

Each program of study has its own requirements for advanced work:

Literary Studies
Engl 339 Literary Theory 3
Engl English Elective 3
Engl 440-463 Literature Seminars 6
12

Rhetorical Studies
Rhetorical Studies Elective 3
Engl 350 Rhetoric and the History of Ideas 3
Engl/Sp Cm 300+Rhetorical Studies Elective 3
Engl 418 Argumentative Writing 3
Engl/Sp Cm 400+Rhetorical Studies Elective 3
12

English Education
Engl 219 Intro to Linguistics 3
Engl 300+English Literature Elective 3
Engl 339 Literary Theory 3
Engl 396 Teaching the Reading of Young Adult Literature 3
Engl 397 Practice & Theory of Teaching Writing in the Secondary Schools 3
Engl 420 History of the English Language 3
Engl 494 Prac & Theory of Teaching Literature in the Secondary School 3
21

There are a number of other course requirements outside of English for English Education majors. These requirements may overlap with General Education requirements for the college:

C I 201 Instructional Media 3
C I 204 Social Foundations of American Education 3
C I 280A Pre-Student-Teaching Experience 4
C I 395 Teaching Reading in Middle and Secondary Schools 3
C I 406 Multicultural Gender Fair Education 3
C I 415 Senior Seminar R
C I 426 Principles of Secondary Education 3
Engl 417 Student Teaching16
Cl St 353 World Literature 3
Psych 230 Developmental Psychology 3 Psych 333 Educational Psychology 3
Hist or Pol S American History or Government 3
Sp Cm 212 or Thtre 358 3
Health, Dance, Safety or Exercise & Sport Science 1

Technical Communication Major Requirements
Technical Communication majors must take 43-45 credits within the major as well as 12 credits in a Designated Area of Concentration (DAC) in a technical, scientific, or design field. Majors develop advanced skills in multiple aspects of technical communication and apply their knowledge of technical communication to a specific discipline.

Theory and History
Engl 310 Rhetorical Analysis 3
Engl 350 Rhetoric and the History of Ideas 3
Engl 411 Technology, Rhetoric and Professional Communication OR Engl 412 Rhetoric in Organizational Culture 3

Linguistics and Literature
Engl 219 Introduction to Linguistics 3
Engl 220 Descriptive English Grammar 3
200- or 300-level literature course 3

Principles, Practices, and Technologies
Engl 213 Computers in the Study of English 3
Engl 314 Technical Communication 3
Engl 416 Visual Aspects of Business and Technical Communication 3
12 additional credits, at least 6 at 400 level, from Engl 309, Engl 313, Engl 449, Engl 413, Engl 442, Engl 415, Engl 418
Communication Elective 3
Engl 487 Internship 1-3
Designated Area of Concentration in a Technical, Scientific, or Design Field 12

The DAC is a student-designed grouping of related courses in a technical, scientific, or design field that will meet the student's professional or academic interests. All courses for the 12-credit DAC must be taken outside the English Department and approved by the Technical Communication Program Coordinator. A second major or a minor in areas such as computer science, social science, natural science, entrepreneurial studies, design studies, engineering studies, or another technical, scientific, or design field may substitute for the DAC.

Learning Goals

Graduates of the bachelor's degree programs in the English Department will demonstrate knowledge of the nature, history, current practice and critical issues in their curricular fields. They will employ the terminology, skills, and techniques specific to the field. Specifically, they will demonstrate advanced skills in reading and writing, speaking and argumentation, and research and application of appropriate technology. They will demonstrate the ability to perform professionally as educators, communicators, writers and editors. They will also be able to analyze aspects of culture and society and will become critical thinkers, having an awareness of ethical and humane issues essential to professional careers and to the practice of lifelong learning. (See department's URL for learning goals for specific programs.)

Graduates of advanced degree programs in the department will have, in addition to these skills, knowledge of theory, methodology, and practice within their disciplines; advanced skills in research, innovation, and creative and critical thinking; and well-developed skills in problem-solving and critical analysis.

Minors and Second Majors

English majors are encouraged to seek a minor or a second major to complement their English studies. To find out the requirements for particular majors or minors, consult the section in this catalog relating to the department offering the major or minor. Students in English Education are particularly encouraged to acquire secondary certification in another teaching area. Consult ISU's certification officer in the College of Education for a list of Iowa Secondary Certification requirements in various subject areas.

Degree Choices

English majors may earn a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree; Technical Communication majors may earn a bachelor of science degree only. For English majors, the B.S. degree requires an extra 12 credits beyond the general education requirements; these credits must be taken in linguistics, natural science, mathematics, social science, or selected courses in Exercise and Sport Science.

English Minor Requirements

The department offers a minor in English, which students may earn by completing at least 18 credits in English courses beyond the 100 level. A student earning an English minor must take 9 of the 18 credits at the 300-level or above and must earn a grade of C (not C-) or higher in each course taken in the minor. No specific courses need be taken; students may design their minor programs around their own interests.

Technical Communication Minor Requirements

The department offers a minor in Technical Communication, which students may earn by completing 18 credits in Technical Communication courses, 6 from Theory and History and 12 from Principles, Practices, and Technologies. Half of the 18 credits must be 300-level or above and students must earn a grade of C (not C-) or higher in each course taken in the minor. Although students may design their minor programs around their own interests, they are encouraged to work with a departmental adviser in Technical Communication.

Departmental Awards and Scholarships

Each spring the English Department offers many scholarships and awards for both undergraduate and graduate students. Some undergraduate awards are for returning English and Technical Communication majors only; others are for returning students of any major demonstrating excellence in some aspect of English or Technical Communication. A list of current awards and application forms are available on the English Department website and in 206 Ross Hall early in the Spring Semester. Award winners are announced each year on May 1 or shortly before.

Other Programs Associated with English

The English Department participates in interdepartmental programs in African American Studies, American Indian Studies, Classical Studies, Latina/o Studies, Linguistics, Speech Communication, Theatre and Women's Studies. (See the Index for requirements for these interdepartmental programs.)

Graduate Study

The master of arts degree programs offer various possibilities for the advanced study of writing, language, and literature. Prospective students must first secure admission to the graduate studies program through the Department of English. Students can be admitted to the M.A. in English with a specialization in literature which is designed to prepare students for teaching at the secondary, two-year college, or beginning college and university levels; or for further graduate study in language and literature. Students can be admitted to the M.A. in Rhetoric, Composition, and Professional Communication designed to prepare students for technical writing, business communication, editing, and associated professional writing. Students can be admitted to one of the optional specializations for the M.A. in TESL/Applied Linguistics: Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL); Language Assessment; English for Specific Purposes (ESP); Literacy; and Literature in ESL. The master of arts degree requires 30 hours of graduate credits, including a thesis or project (2-3 credits). The M.A. in English (literature specialization) and the M.A. in TESL/Applied Linguistics have language requirements that may be met through a number of options, including previous foreign language study, graduate linguistics courses, or satisfactory performance on a test-out exam. A student whose native language is other than English is considered to have met the language requirement after satisfying the Graduate College English requirement.

The master of fine arts program in Creative Writing and Environment is unique in its effort to cultivate in its students an interdisciplinary approach to research and writing, as well as develop a heightened environmental imagination that finds expression in quality, publishable works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. The program is designed to prepare students for careers as writers, teachers at the college and university level, and editors. Prospective students must first secure admission to the graduate studies program through the Department of English. The master of fine arts degree requires 54 hours of graduate credit: a core of creative writing courses, a book-length thesis (6 credits), a fieldwork experiential component (3 credits), and 18 credits in disciplines other than English (such as Landscape Architecture, Anthropology, Environmental Science, among many others) relevant to an individual student's research interests and thesis project.

The doctor of philosophy in Applied Linguistics and Technology focuses on English language teaching and assessment with particular emphasis on issues and practices related to technology use in these areas. It prepares students to hold a variety of academic appointments in departments of applied linguistics and English, and professional opportunities in research and development foundations, international publishing enterprises, and government agencies in the U.S. and around the world where English as a second language is taught and used for specific educational, vocational, and professional purposes. Prospective students must first secure admission to the graduate studies program through the Department of English. Candidates are required to complete 72 hours of graduate credit and a dissertation, and to pass a portfolio assessment, a preliminary examination consisting of a dissertation proposal and pilot study and a written reponse to questions about the proposal or pilot study, and an oral defense of the dissertation.

The doctor of philosophy in Rhetoric and Professional Communication focuses on the theory of rhetoric and the practice of written communication in professional communities such as business, industry, and government. The degree qualifies graduates for academic positions in rhetoric and in business and technical communication, as well as for work in the private sector as professional writing specialists, editors, and communications production managers. Prospective students must first secure admission to the graduate studies program through the Department of English. Candidates are required to complete 72 hours of graduate credit and a dissertation, and to pass a portfolio assessment, a preliminary examination consisting of a comprehensive examination and a special field examination, and an oral defense of the dissertation.

The department offers graduate students an opportunity to gain professional experience through professional writing internships, selected departmental research activities, the Intensive English and Orientation Program (IEOP), ISUComm Foundation Courses program, the Advanced Communication program, and the Interpersonal and Rhetorical Communication program. Teaching and research assistantships are available for qualified students. Teaching assistants are responsible for teaching, with faculty supervision, classes in first-year composition (ISUComm foundation courses), courses in public speaking, courses in English as a second language, and courses in business and technical communication. Research assistants are assigned to individual faculty members engaged in projects in writing, language, or literature. One or more Pearl Hogrefe Fellowships in Creative Writing covering stipend and tuition are awarded each year to outstanding graduate students. Grannis Scholarships are awarded to new students in the Applied Linguistics and Technology doctoral program. Several Freda Huncke Foundation Graduate Teaching Fellowships are available to first-year Rhetoric and Professional Communication doctoral students. Miller Fellowships are also available to highly qualified students in both of our doctoral programs (Rhetoric and Professional Communication; Applied Linguistics and Technology).

With prior written approval from the College of Human Sciences, students may take English courses to meet part of the requirements for certification to teach English in two-year and community colleges. Selected courses may also be used to meet requirements for ESL endorsement (K-12) for teachers.

A graduate minor in the English Department at the master's level requires 9 credits of English at the 500 or 600 level in the respective major (English, RCPC, TESL/AL). A graduate minor in the English Department at the Ph.D. level requires 12 credits at the 500 or 600 level in the respective major (ALT, RPC).

Courses open for nonmajor graduate credit: 313, 315, 316, 335, 340, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 355, 357, 358, 396, 410, 411, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 418, 420, 422, 425, 440, 441, 450, 451, 452, 453, 460, 461, 463, 489.

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

Engl 010. Intensive English and Orientation Program. (21-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS. Prereq: Recommendation of the English Department. Full-time study of English for speakers of other languages. Brochure available from the IEOP Office, 102 Landscape Architecture, or at www.ieop.iastate.edu. Satisfactory-fail only.

Engl 099. Strategies for Non-native Speakers of English. Cr. 0. F.S. Prereq: Recommendation of English Department; placement in sections is determined by examination.
L. Strategies for Listening. Available P/NP to graduate students at their department's option.
R. Strategies for Reading. Available for P/NP to graduate students at their department's option.

Engl 101. English for Native Speakers of Other Languages. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Recommendation of English Department; placement in various sections is determined by examination. (See English Requirement for International Students in Index.). For undergraduates: Completion of English 101 requirement prepares students for English 150. For graduates: Completion of English 101 satisfies the English requirement of the Graduate College. Engl 101 courses are limited to students who are nonnative speakers of English. Credit from Engl 101 does not count toward graduation.
B. Academic English
I. Available P/NP to graduate students at their department's option.
C. Academic English II--Undergraduates.
D. Academic English II--Graduates. Available P/NP to graduate students at their department's option.

Engl 120. Computers and Language. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. Introduction to the use of linguistic knowledge in computer applications today and the basic computational techniques used in such applications. The development of these techniques throughout the history of computational linguistics. How the study of language has contributed to the advancement of technology and how certain computational problems have influenced the way linguists study language.

Engl 150. Critical Thinking and Communication. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in Lib 160. Application of critical reading and thinking abilities to topics of civic and cultural importance. Introduction of basic oral, visual, and electronic communication principles to support writing development. Initiation of communication portfolio.

Engl 180. Communication Skills for International Teaching Assistants. (Cross-listed with U St). Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S. Placement based upon SPEAK/TEACH test results. Persons whose native language is English cannot take 180 for credit. No more than one section of 180 may be taken per semester; up to two sections total. Credit for Engl 180 does not apply toward graduation. Satisfactory-fail only.
A. Speaking Skills. Cr. 3. Emphasis on pronunciation improvement and greater fluency in spoken English for teaching purposes.
B. Intermediate Spoken English. Cr. 3.
C. Advanced Spoken English. Cr. 3. For students who have completed 180A or 180B but have not reached the passing level on the SPEAK/TEACH test.
D. Presentation Skills. Cr. 3. Developing explanations, leading discussions and handling questions in a teaching environment.
E. Supervised Independent Study. Cr. 1. Seminar with individual observation and consultation.

Engl 199. Introduction to the Study of English. (1-0) Cr. R. F.S. 8 weeks. General introduction to the discipline; discussion of the various fields in English; consideration of career opportunities. Satisfactory-fail only.

Engl 201. Introduction to Literature. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Credit in or exemption from 150. Study of selected examples of drama, poetry, short fiction, and the novel drawn from both British and American literature. Recommended for non-majors.

Engl 205. Popular Culture Analysis. (Cross-listed with Sp Cm). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Credit in or exemption from 150. Analysis of how information and entertainment forms persuade and manipulate audiences. Study of several forms that may include newspapers, speeches, television, film, advertising, fiction, and magazines. Special attention to verbal and visual devices.

Engl 207. Introduction to Creative Writing. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Credit in or exemption from 150. Course introduces students to the fundamentals of writing fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Extensive readings in all three genres. Students learn creative processes through writing exercises, workshops, and conferences.

Engl 213. Computers in the Study of English. (Cross-listed with Sp Cm). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 250. Introduction to the role that computers play in English studies. Use of discipline-specific databases, applications, and online resources. Theoretical and practical understanding of online environments and information management procedures. Work with computer applications for writing, editing, imaging, and World Wide Web site development. Strategies for online portfolio production and study of the impact of computer technology on the discipline of English.

Engl 219. Introduction to Linguistics. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Sophomore classification. Introduction to linguistic concepts and principles of linguistic analysis with English as the primary source of data. Sound and writing systems, sentence structure, vocabulary, and meaning. Issues in the study of usage, regional and social dialects, language acquisition, and language change.

Engl 220. Descriptive English Grammar. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 250. Overview of grammatical structures and functions. Parts of speech; phrase, clause, and sentence structure; sentence types and sentence analysis; rhetorical grammar and sentence style; terminology. Not a remedial, English composition, or ESL course.

Engl 225. Survey of British Literature to 1800. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250. Representative works of British literature from the origins to 1800 in historical, cultural, and literary contexts. Will include multiple genres.

Engl 226. Survey of British Literature since 1800. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250. Representative works from 1800 to the present in historical, cultural, and literary contexts. Will include multiple genres and may include texts that reflect and/or critique the impact and legacy of the British empire on its former colonies, i.e., postcolonial literature.

Engl 227. Survery of American Literature to 1865. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250. Representative works of American literature from its origins (including indigenous and conquest literatures) through the end of the Civil War in historical, cultural, and literary contexts. Will include multiple genres.

Engl 228. Survey of American Literature since 1865. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250. Representative works written in the United States since the Civil War in historical, cultural, and literary contexts, with attention to the cultural and ethnic diversity of Americans. Will include multiple genres.

Engl 237. Survey of Film History. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Credit in or exemption from 150. A survey of the history of film, both U.S. and international, from the beginnings in the late nineteenth century to the present.

Engl 240. Introduction to American Indian Literature. (Cross-listed with Am In). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Credit in or exemption from Engl 150. Appreciation of oral and written forms of American Indian literatures. Tropes and techniques in oral, visual and written texts. Focus on the role of American Indians in interdisciplinary approaches to modern social and environmental issues as expressed in literary works.

Engl 250. Written, Oral, Visual, and Electronic Composition. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: 150 or exemption from 150; sophomore classification or exemption from 150; credit for or concurrent enrollment in Lib 160. Analyzing, composing, and reflecting on written, oral, visual, and electronic (WOVE) discourse within academic, civic, and cultural contexts. Emphasis on supporting a claim and using primary and secondary sources. Continued development of student portfolio.

Engl 250H. Written, Oral, Visual, and Electronic Composition, Honors. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Exemption from 150 and admission to Freshman Honors Program; credit for or concurrent enrollment in Lib 160. In-depth analysis, composition, and reflection on written, oral, visual, and electronic (WOVE) discourse within academic, civic, and cultural contexts. Emphasis on argumentation: developing claims, generating reasons, providing evidence. Individual sections organized by special topics. Development of student portfolio.

Engl 260. Introduction to Literary Study. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Credit in or exemption from 150. Basic principles of literary study. Emphasis on writing of interpretive and critical essays. Particular attention to poetry. Designed for English majors.

Engl 302. Business Communication. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: 250, junior classification. Theory, principles and processes of effective written communication typically encountered in business and the professions. Extensive practice in many areas of workplace communication, including letter, memo, and email correspondence; short proposals and reports; policies and procedures; job packet including letters of application and resumes; website analysis; brochures; and individual and team presentations.
H. Honors.

Engl 303. Free-Lance Writing for Popular Magazines. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 250, not open to freshmen. Practical workshop in writing nonfiction articles for popular magazines. Emphasis on writing, market research, preparation of manuscripts, methods of submission. Major goal of the course is production of marketable material.

Engl 304. Creative Writing--Fiction. (Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 250, not open to freshmen. Progresses from practice in basic techniques of fiction writing to fully developed short stories. Emphasis on writing, analytical reading, workshop criticism, and individual conferences.

Engl 305. Creative Writing--Nonfiction. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 250, not open to freshmen. Workshop in writing imaginative essays, both critical and personal. Analytical reading, development of literary techniques. Individual and small group conferences.

Engl 306. Creative Writing--Poetry. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 250, not open to freshmen. Progresses from traditional to contemporary forms. Emphasis on writing, analytical reading, workshop criticism, and individual conferences.

Engl 309. Report and Proposal Writing. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 250, junior classification. Introduction to the theory and practice of preparing and analyzing reports and proposals intended for businesses, governmental agencies, and/or private and corporate foundations. Individual assignments and group projects include text documents and oral presentations. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 310. Rhetorical Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 250. Fundamental principles of rhetorical criticism. Focus on selected theories for analyzing cultural texts, including essays, speeches, film, technical and scientific documents, and websites. Emphasis on identifying artifacts, formulating research questions, applying methodologies, and understanding and practicing critical analysis through discussion and in writing.

Engl 313. Writing for the World Wide Web. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 250. Rhetorical principles of hypertextual writing and publishing. Group and individual projects using XHTML to construct interactive sites for the World Wide Web. Special emphasis on business and technical applications. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 314. Technical Communication. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: 250, junior classification. Theories, principles, and processes of effective written communication of technical information. Attention to major strategies for analyzing and adapting to audiences in various communication situations and composing technical discourse including organizing visual and verbal information. Extensive practice in many areas of technical communication, including instructions and procedures, proposals and reports, website analysis and design, and individual and team presentations.
H. Honors.

Engl 315. Creative Writing--Screenplays. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 250, not open to freshmen. Stresses master scene technique of writing fully developed screenplays. Emphasis on movie techniques, writing, workshop criticism, analytical reading and viewing, and individual conferences. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 316. Creative Writing--Playwriting. (Cross-listed with Thtre). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Engl 250, not open to freshmen. Progresses from production of scenes to fully developed one-act plays. Emphasis on action, staging, writing, analytical reading, workshop criticism, and individual conferences. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 330. Science Fiction. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250. Study of science fiction from its origins in nineteenth-century to the present. May include study of specific types of science fiction, such as classic, cyberpunk, feminist, or apocalyptic narratives; and may include consideration of science fiction film and/or theory.

Engl 335. Studies in Film. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: 250. Principles of film art and the traditional vocabulary of literature as applied to film. Influence of film on modes of thought and behavior. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 339. Literary Theory and Criticism. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 260 and 3 additional credits in literature. Study of selected texts of literary criticism, with attention to the purposes and practices of criticism.

Engl 340. Women's Literature. (Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Engl 250. Historical and thematic survey of literature by and about women. May include autobiographies, journals, letters, poetry, fiction, and drama. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 344. U.S. Latino/a Literature. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 250. An introduction to the literature of Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans and other Latino/a sub-groups. Special emphasis on themes such as ethnic relations and comparisons with Euroamerican literary traditions.

Engl 345. Women and Literature: Selected Topics. (Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Engl 250. Literature by women and/or dealing with the images of women, e.g., study of individual authors or related schools of authors; exploration of specific themes or genres in women's literature; analysis of recurrent images of women in literature. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 346. American Indian Literature. (Cross-listed with Am In). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 250. Survey of literature by Native Americans from pre-Columbian tales and songs to contemporary novels and poetry. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 347. African American Literature to 1960. (Cross-listed with Af Am). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250. Intensive study of African American writing, possibly including slave narratives, Harlem Renaissance works, literature of social protest, and forerunners of contemporary works that reveal key thematic, stylistic, and historical range of the literature. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 348. Contemporary African American Literature. (Cross-listed with Af Am). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 250. Intensive reading in literature by African Americans from 1960 to the present. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 349. Topics in Multicultural Literatures of the United States. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: 250. Literature by writers from U.S. multicultural groups. May include literature of several groups or focus upon one of the following: Asian Americans, African Americans, Latino/a Americans, American Indians. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 350. Rhetorical Theories and Issues in Context. (Cross-listed with Cl St, Sp Cm). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Engl 250. Ideas about the relationship between rhetoric and society in contemporary and historical contexts. An exploration of classical and contemporary rhetorical theories in relation to selected topics that may include politics, gender, race, ethics, education, science, or technology.

Engl 351. Literature and Science. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250. Study of texts that may include the following topics: the representation of science in literature; the use of literature by science and scientists; reading "scientific" texts as literature; the interactions between literary and scientific ideas.

Engl 352. Gay and Lesbian Literature. (Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Engl 250. Literary portrayals of gay and lesbian lives and relationships from many different genres. Attention to changing definitions and representations of sexual orientation and gender identity over time.

Engl 353. World Literature: Western Foundations through Renaissance. (Cross-listed with Cl St). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 250. Representative works from the drama, epics, poetry, and prose of the Ancient World through the late sixteenth century. May include Homer, Aeschylus, Sappho, Catullus, Dante, Marie de France, Boccaccio, Christine de Pizan, Cervantes, and others.

Engl 354. World Literature: Seventeenth Century to the Present. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 250. Representative works primarily from European traditions of drama, fiction, poetry, and nonfiction.

Engl 355. Literature and the Environment. (Cross-listed with Env S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Engl 250. Study of literary texts that address the following topics, among others: the relationship between people and natural/urban environments, ecocriticism, and the importance of place in the literary imagination. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 358. Myth and Fairytale. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250. Study of traditional fairytales, myths, and legends from diverse cultures. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 359. Literature and the Arts. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250. Study of texts that may include the following topics: the relationship between literature and other art forms (including painting, sculpture, dance, music, photography, and film); the representation of the arts in literature; the influences of other art forms on literature; the interrelation of art theory and literary theory.

Engl 360. Studies in American Literature to 1800. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250; sophomore classification. Selected readings in American literature from its beginnings through the colonial period; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.

Engl 362. Studies in 19th Century American Literature. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250; sophomore classification. Selected readings in American literature of the 19th century; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.

Engl 364. Studies in American Literature: 1900 to the Present. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250; sophomore classification. Selected readings in American literature since 1900; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.

Engl 370. Shakespeare. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 250. Reading and analysis of selected plays. Development of Shakespeare's dramatic art in its social and intellectual context.

Engl 373. Studies in British Literature: The Middle Ages. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250; sophomore classification. Selected readings in medieval literature from its beginnings through the fifteenth century; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.

Engl 374. Studies in British Literature: The Renaissance. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250; sophomore classification. Selected readings in British literature from 1500 to 1660; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.

Engl 375. Studies in British Literature: The Restoration and 18th Century. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 250; sophomore classification. Selected readings in British literature from 1660 to 1800; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.

Engl 376. Studies in British Literature: Romantic and Victorian. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250; sophomore classification. Selected readings from British literature from the late eighteenth century to about 1900; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.

Engl 378. Studies in British Literature: 1900 to the Present. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250; sophomore classification. Selected readings in British literature since 1900; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.

Engl 389. Postcolonial Literatures. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 250; sophomore classification. Historical, thematic and theoretical study of postcolonial literatures from one or more of the following areas: Africa, India, South Asia, the Caribbean, and the Middle East. Irish and Black British writers may also be included.

Engl 393. The History of Children's Literature. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 250. Origin and development of English and American children's literature through the early twentieth century. Special emphasis on nature, structure, and enduring themes of fantasy literature.

Engl 395. Study and Travel. Cr. arr. SS. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Supervised study of an appropriate area of the discipline while traveling in a foreign country or in the U.S. Special fees apply.
A. Literature.
B. Creative Writing.
C. Linguistics.
D. Rhetoric and Professional Communication.
E. Teacher Education.

Engl 396. Teaching the Reading of Young Adult Literature. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 250. Critical study and evaluation of the genre; examination of modes and themes found in the literature; strategies of effective reading; study of the relationship of the genre to children's literature and adult literature; discussion techniques for teachers and parents. Evaluation of literature for use in school programs. Restricted to students seeking teacher licensure. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 397. Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing in the Secondary Schools. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 219 or 220; minimum GPA of 2.5; ACT score of 19 or higher; Praxis score of 520 or higher, with no individual score below 170. Introduction to teaching secondary language arts. Current theories and practices in the teaching of writing to secondary school students. Theories of rhetoric, approaches to teaching, lesson design and planning. Evaluating writing. Professional portfolio preparation. (Taken concurrently with C I 280. Cr. 2.). Students must begin the application process for admission to the University Teacher Education Program and initiate an Iowa State Department of Criminal Investigation background check prior to the semester in which they plan to take English 397.

Engl 404. Creative Writing Workshop--Fiction. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: 304. Individual projects in short fiction on a workshop and conference basis. Readings in short fiction. Discussion of elements of narrative such as plot, point of view, characterization, theme, setting.

Engl 405. Creative Writing Workshop--Nonfiction. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: 305. Individual projects in memoir, immersion journalism, character studies, and/or the personal essay on a workshop and conference basis. Readings in creative nonfiction.

Engl 406. Creative Writing Workshop--Poetry. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: 306. Individual projects in poetry on a workshop and conference basis. Readings in poetry. Discussion of poetic elements such as image, sound, internal structure, rhythm, tone, figurative language.

Engl 411. Technology, Rhetoric, and Professional Communication. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 310; 302, 309, 313, or 314; junior classification. Study of the implication of technologies, especially computer technology, for the writing and reading of business, technical, and academic texts. Focus on selected technology-related topics.

Engl 412. Rhetoric in Organizational Culture. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 310; 302, 309, or 314; junior classification. Explores through readings, writing, discussion and research how discourse both reflects and constructs institutions and organizations as well as individuals within these organizations in academic, community, and workplace settings. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 413. Composing Documentation and Instructional Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 313; 302, 309, or 314; junior classification. Rhetorical approach to analyzing, creating, testing, and producing instruction sheets, policy and procedure manuals, computer documentation, and other types of instructions. Coverage of print, online, oral, and visual instructional materials. Attention to safety, ethical, and liability issues.

Engl 415. Business and Technical Editing. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 302, 309, or 314; junior classification. Editing journal articles, research reports, technical manuals, newsletters, and proposals. Attention to editorial levels and styles, project management, editor-author relationships, and electronic editing. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 416. Visual Aspects of Business and Technical Communication. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 302, 309, or 314; junior classification. Rhetoric of visual elements in business and technical communication. Issues in the design of text, charts, graphs, diagrams, schematics, illustrations, and other visual displays.

Engl 417. Student Teaching. (Cross-listed with C I). Cr. 8-16. F.S. Prereq: 494, admission to teacher education, approval of coordinator the semester prior to student teaching. Full-time teaching in secondary English: long term and unit planning, lesson planning, classroom teaching practice in English language arts.
A. Social Studies
B. Physical Sciences
C. Mathematics
D. Biological Sciences
E. English and Literature (Same as Engl 417E)
F. Speech Communications (Same as Engl 417F)
G. Foreign Language (Same as WLC 417G)
J. Earth Sciences
K. Music - Secondary (Same as Music 417K)
L. Music - Elementary (Same as Music 417L)
M. Science - Basic
N. International Student Teaching

Engl 418. Seminar in Argumentation. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 310, junior classification. Advanced seminar in theory and analysis with extensive practice in various modes of argument. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 420. History of the English Language. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Engl 219, 220. Comparison of English to other languages by family background and by type. Analysis of representative Old, Middle, Early Modern and present-day English texts, including both literary works and non-literary documents. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 422. Women, Men, and the English Language. (Cross-listed with Ling, W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Engl 219. The ways men and women differ in using language in varied settings and the ways in which language both creates and reflects gender divisions. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 425. Second Language Learning and Teaching. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: Engl 219; junior classification. The process of second language learning and principles and techniques of teaching second languages. Learning and teaching in specific situations and for particular purposes. Current applications of technology in teaching and assessment. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 437. Grammatical Analysis. (Dual-listed with 537). (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 220; junior classification. Theories and methods for analysis of English syntax with emphasis on recent syntactic theory.

Engl 440. Seminar in British Literature. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: Completion of 9 credits of surveys; completion of or concurrent enrollment in 339; junior classification. Selected authors, movements, eras, or genres in British literature. Readings in criticism; required research paper. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 441. Seminar in American Literature. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Completion of 9 credits of surveys; completion of or concurrent enrollment in 339; junior classification. Selected authors, movements, eras, or genres in American literature. Readings in criticism; required research paper. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 442. Production Processes for Technical Documents. (Dual-listed with 542). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 302, 309, 313, or 314; junior classification. Review of the principles of desktop publishing as practiced in the field of technical communication. Focus on theories of print document design and project management, as well as digital prepress techniques needed to produce documents using outside print bureaus. Practice with current desktop publishing software.

Engl 445. Seminar: Literature Crossing Boundaries. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Completion of 9 credits of surveys; completion of or concurrent enrollment in 339; junior classification. Intensive study of selected literature that bridges traditional genre, period, national, or disciplinary boundaries. Readings in criticism; required research paper.

Engl 449. Multimedia Design in Professional Communication. (Dual-listed with 549). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 302, 309, 313, or 314; junior classification. Rhetorical principles of information-based multimedia design. Practical understanding of computer applications used in multimedia development. Focus on theoretical and practical elements of producing multimedia training programs in both education and industry. Work with interactive hypertext, digital audio, and non-linear video editing.

Engl 450. Seminar in Drama and Film. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: Completion of 9 credits of 225, 226, 227, or 228; completion of or concurrent enrollment in 339; junior classification. Selected playwrights, screenwriters, film directors, dramatic or cinematic movements, genres, or national traditions. Readings in criticism; required research paper. Nonmajor graduate credit.
A. Drama
B. Film
C. Other

Engl 451. Seminar in Poetry. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: Completion of 9 credits of surveys; completion of or concurrent enrollment in 339; junior classification. Selected authors, movements, eras, or national literatures. Readings in criticism; required research paper. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 452. Seminar in Prose. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: Completion of 9 credits of surveys; completion of or concurrent enrollment in 339; junior classification. Selected authors, movements, eras, or national literatures. May include the novel, the short story, the essay, or autobiography. Readings in criticism; required research paper. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 460. Seminar in Gender and Ethnicity. (Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: Completion of 9 credits of surveys; completion of or concurrent enrollment in 339; junior classification. Selected readings of various authors, movements, eras, or genres. Readings in criticism; required research paper. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 480. Field Experience for Secondary Teaching Preparation. (Cross-listed with C I). Cr. 0.5-2. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: Permission of area coordinator required prior to enrollment. Observation and participation in a variety of school settings after admission to the teacher preparation program. (S/F grading may be used in some offerings of some sections.)
E. English and Literature (Same as C I 480E.)
F. Speech Communication (Same as C I 490F.)

Engl 487. Internship in Business, Technical, and Professional Communication. Cr. 1-3. S. Prereq: 9 credits in 302, 309, 313, 314, 413, 415 (preferred), 416, or 442, senior classification; and permission of coordinator. An opportunity to write, edit, and design business and technical documents in a professional setting. Projects include reports, proposals, manuals, brochures, newsletters.

Engl 489. Undergraduate Seminar. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F. Prereq: 9 credits in English beyond 250. Intensive study of a selected topic in literature, criticism, rhetoric, writing, or language. Cross-listing with linguistics acceptable only when offered as a course in linguistics. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Engl 490. Independent Study. Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: 9 credits in English beyond 250 appropriate to the section taken, junior classification, permission of Undergraduate Studies Committee. Designed to meet the needs of students who wish study in areas other than those in which courses are offered, or who desire to integrate a study of literature or language with special problems in major fields. No more than 9 credits of Engl 490 may be used toward graduation.
A. Literature
B. Linguistics, Semantics (Ling 490B)
C. Rhetoric, Teaching of Composition
D. Criticism and Theory of Literature
E. Reading: Instructional Methods and Research
F. Creative Writing
G. Business/Technical Communication
H. Honors

Engl 494. Practice and Theory of Teaching Literature in the Secondary Schools. (Cross-listed with C I). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Engl 310, 397, 9 other credits in English beyond 250, Psych 333, admission to teacher education program. Portfolio review. Current theories and practices in the teaching of literature to secondary school students. Integrating literary study and writing. Preparation and selection of materials. Classroom presentation. Unit planning. (Taken concurrently with C I 280, Cr. 2, and Sp Ed 450)

Engl 497. Graduating Senior Assessment. (1-0) Cr. R. F.S. Prereq: 199. Must be taken by all seniors in their last semester of classes.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

Engl 500. Proseminar: Teaching English Composition. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Required of all new English teaching assistants. Introduction to the teaching of First-Year Composition (FYC). Foundational and relevant newer composition theory and pedagogical methods related to FYC objectives and their classroom enactment, including development of assignments and supporting activities, and evaluation of student projects.

Engl 503. Theory and Research in Composition. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 6 credits in English. In-dept consideration of the theory and practice of critical composition pedagogy. Opportunities for actual classroom application.

Engl 504. Teaching Business and Technical Communication. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 302, 309 or 314. Theory and practice of teaching college courses in business and technical communication. Some consideration of in-service writing courses for business and government. Emphasis on applicable communication and composition theory, curriculum planning, assignment design, and materials development.

Engl 505. Technology in Business, Technical, and Professional Communication. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: Graduate classification. Examination of the role of technology, especially computer technology, in communication practices within academic and workplace settings.

Engl 506. Theory and Research in Professional Communication. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 6 credits in English. Introduction to professional communication as a discipline, with emphasis on theories of communication and discourse that inform professional communication research and on trends and developments in that research and the field.

Engl 507. Writing and Analyzing Professional Documents. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 6 credits in English. Introduction to the theory and practice of planning, preparing, and presenting information in written, oral, and visual forms prepared for business, science, industry, and government. Guided readings. Team projects. Individual projects.

Engl 508. Advanced Workshop in Academic Writing. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. SS., offered 2009. Prereq: 6 graduate credits. Hands-on practice in writing academic discourse for publication; rhetorical analyses of student-selected academic journals; discussion of current trends in academic writing; professional perspectives on the referee process and on journal editorial decision making. Focus on the writing of selected short pieces (opinion essays, standard reviews, conference-length papers) and of article-length manuscripts.

Engl 509. Writing Proposals and Grant Applications. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 6 credits in English composition. Introduction to the theory and practice of preparing and analyzing proposals and grant applications intended for businesses, governmental agencies, and/or private and corporate foundations. Individual assignments and group projects include text documents and oral presentations.

Engl 510. Introduction to Computers in Applied Linguistics. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate classification. Use of applications software for language teaching, linguistic analysis, and statistical analysis. Issues and problems in applied linguistics related to computer methods.

Engl 511. Introduction to Linguistic Analysis. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate classification. Principles and methods of linguistic analysis with emphasis on phonology, morphology, and syntax. Description of linguistic variation and current theoretical approaches to linguistics.

Engl 514. Sociolinguistics. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 511 or an introductory course in linguistics. Theories and methods of examining language in its social setting. Analysis of individual characteristics (e.g., age, gender, ethnicity, social class, region), interactional factors (e.g., situation, topic, purpose) and national policies affecting language use.

Engl 517. Second Language Acquisition. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 511 or an introductory course in linguistics. Theory, methods, and results of second language acquisition research with emphasis on approaches relevant to second language teaching.

Engl 518. Teaching English as a Second Language Methods and Materials. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 511 or an introductory course in linguistics. Introduction to approaches, methods, techniques, materials, curricular design, and assessment for various levels of ESL instruction. Attention to issues related to the teaching of listening, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary, pronunciation, and culture.

Engl 519. Second Language Assessment. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 517. Principles of second language assessment including reliability, validity, authenticity and practicality. Constructing, scoring, interpreting, and evaluating second language tests for a variety of situations.

Engl 520. Computational Analysis of English. (Cross-listed with Ling, HCI). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Engl 510 or 511. Concepts and practices for analysis of English by computer with emphasis on the applications of computational analysis to problems in applied linguistics such as corpus analysis and recognition of learner language in computer-assisted learning and language assessment.

Engl 521. Teaching of Literature and the Literature Curriculum. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Examination of the roles of the literary work, reader, and teacher in literary study. Responses to literature. Place of literature in language arts. Study and development of curriculum materials for middle school, high school, and college levels of instruction.

Engl 522. Literary Theory and Criticism. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Examination of the history, logic, and rhetoric of contemporary literary criticism and analysis.

Engl 523. Introduction to Old English Language and Literature. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Course in medieval literature or history or history of the English language recommended. Introductory study of Old English language and literature in prose and poetry, including extracts from Beowulf. Some attention to Anglo-Saxon culture.

Engl 524. Literacy: Issues and Methods for Nonnative Speakers of English. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 511 or an introductory course in linguistics. Theoretical and practical issues and techniques in the teaching of literacy in a variety of contexts, involving children and adults at basic skill levels and teens and adults in academic and vocational programs.

Engl 525. Methods in Teaching Listening and Speaking Skills to Nonnative Speakers of English. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 511 or an introductory course in linguistics. Theoretical and practical issues and techniques in the teaching of second language pronunciation, listening, and speaking skills. Topics will be relevant to those intending to teach in various contexts involving both K-12 and adult learners.

Engl 526. Computer-Assisted Language Learning. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 511 or equivalent. Theory, research, and practice in computer use for teaching non-native speakers of English. Methods for planning and evaluating computer-based learning activities.

Engl 527. Discourse Analysis. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 511 or an introductory course in linguistics. Methods and theoretical foundations for linguistic approaches to discourse analysis. Applications of discourse analysis to the study of texts in a variety of settings, including academic and research contexts.

Engl 528. English for Specific Purposes. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 511 or an introductory course in linguistics. Issues and techniques in analyzing, teaching, and assessing English for specific purposes. Topics include theories of specific purpose language use, analysis of learner needs in target language contexts, and syllabus and materials development for teaching and assessment.

Engl 531. Topics in the Study of Literature. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Intensive study of literary genres, periods, movements, or themes; e.g., Literature and Historicism, Narrating the Feminine, Allegory.

Engl 532. American Literature to 1865. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Selected texts in American literature from Discovery to the Civil War. Study may include Colonial and Revolutionary periods, Early Republic, and Jacksonian Era, in critical and cultural contexts.

Engl 533. British Literature to 1830. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Selected texts from the Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration, Eighteenth-Century, and/or Romantic periods, in critical and cultural contexts.

Engl 534. American Literature 1865 to the Present. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Selected texts in American literature from the Civil War to the present. Study may include Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Postmodernism, with significant attention to race/ethnicity, gender, and identity, and to contemporary critical views. Range of authors and genres.

Engl 535. British Literature 1830 to the Present. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Selected texts from the Victorian, Edwardian, Modernist, and/or Contemporary periods, in critical and cultural contexts.

Engl 536. Postcolonial Literatures. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Colonial and postcolonial Anglophone literatures from various locations, such as Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and the British Isles, in critical and cultural contexts.

Engl 537. Grammatical Analysis. (Dual-listed with 437). (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 219, 220, or 511; junior classification. Theories and methods for analysis of English syntax with emphasis on recent syntactic theory.

Engl 538. Fiction. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Selected fiction writers in English; range of authors and genres. Emphasis on both male and female writers; attention to the relationships between fiction and cultural change.

Engl 539. Poetry. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Selected poets writing in English, considered in representative groups. Some emphasis on twentieth-century poets and poetics.

Engl 540. Drama. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Primary texts in dramatic genres from various literary periods, in critical and cultural contexts. Frequently concentrates on the English Renaissance and the Shakespearean stage.

Engl 541. Autobiography, Biography, Memoir. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Study of lifewriting, e.g., autobiography, biography, memoir, cross-genre writing, autobiographical criticism. Readings may be arranged by period, nationality, or subgenre (e.g., autobiography of childhood experience, celebrity auto/biography).

Engl 542. Production Processes for Technical Documents. (Dual-listed with 442). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 302, 309, 313, or 314; junior classification. Review of the principles of desktop publishing as practiced in the field of technical communication. Focus on theories of print document design and project management, as well as digital prepress techniques needed to produce documents using outside print bureaus. Practice with current desktop publishing software.

Engl 543. Environmental Literature. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate classification. An exploration of the major genres that derive from literary encounters with the environment. Readings may come from various cultures and time periods, but about half of the texts will represent canonical American envionmental literature from the 19th and 20th centuries.

Engl 544. Multicultural U.S. Literatures. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Primary texts by U.S. multicultural writers. Development of U.S. literary traditions, discourses of race and gender, counter-storytelling, myths of origin, phases and movements within the national literary canon. Readings in several genres.

Engl 545. Women's Literature. (Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Primary texts by women writers; historical, thematic, formal, or theoretical approaches; secondary readings; e.g., Nineteenth-Century Women Writers; American Women's Personal Narratives; Southern Women Writers of the U.S.

Engl 546. Issues in the Study of Literature. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 6 credits in literature. Intensive study of current and emerging topics and problems concerning literature and its relationship to theory and to language study; e.g., Theory of Metaphor; Renegotiating the Canon; Feminist Theory.

Engl 547. The History of Rhetorical Theory I: From Plato to Bacon. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 6 credits in English. Rhetorical theory from the classical period of ancient Greece and Rome through the Middle Ages to the early Renaissance; attention to its relation to the nature of knowledge, communication, practice, and pedagogy.

Engl 548. The History of Rhetorical Theory II: From Bacon to the Present. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 6 credits in English. Rhetorical theory from the early modern period (Bacon, Descartes, and Locke) to the present; attention to its relation to the nature of knowledge, communication practice, and pedagogy.

Engl 549. Multimedia Design in Professional Communication. (Dual-listed with 449). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 505. Rhetorical principles of information-based multimedia design. Practical understanding of computer applications used in multimedia development. Focus on theoretical and practical elements of producing multimedia training programs in both education and industry. Work with interactive hypertext, digital audio, and non-linear video editing.

Engl 550. The Study of Craft: Poetry, Fiction, and Nonfiction. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate classification. A multigenre craft course required of all incoming Creative Writing students. Readings and writings on the craft of writing poetry, fiction, and nonfiction; some attention to the craft of environmental and nature writing.

Engl 552. Editing and Production of Literary Journals. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate classification. Literary publishing, from submission to print. Hands-on experience making a literary journal. Investigation of the production of the country's leading journals. Individual editing projects.

Engl 553. Graduate Workshop: Writing The Long Project. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: 550 and graduate classification. Open to graduate students outside Creative Writing only with permission of instructor. Individual long creative writing project ideas developed in course. Portions of long creative writing project workshopped, revised, discussed in conferences.

Engl 554. Graduate Fiction Workshop. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: 550 and graduate classification. Open to graduate students outside Creative Writing only with permission of instructor. Individual projects in fiction on a workshop and conference basis. Readings in short fiction. Discussion of elements of narrative such as plot, point of view, characterization, theme, setting.

Engl 555. Graduate Nonfiction Workshop. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: 550 and graduate classification. Open to graduate students outside Creative Writing only with permission of instructor. Individual projects in memoir, immersion journalism, character studies, and/or the personal essay on a workshop and conference basis. Readings in creative nonfiction.

Engl 556. Graduate Poetry Workshop. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: 550 and graduate classification. Open to graduate students outside Creative Writing only with permission of instructor. Individual projects in poetry on a workshop and conference basis. Readings in poetry. Discussion of poetic elements such as image, sound, internal structure, rhythm, tone, figurative language.

Engl 557. Studies in Creative Writing. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: Graduate classification. Special topics course on ideas, issues, and techniques in creative writing. Subject matter may include specific genres, aspects of the creative writing process, or themes of particular interest. Significant readings and written work required; previous workshop experience helpful.

Engl 558. Teaching Creative Writing. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Graduate classification. Pedagogical approaches that are effective for grade-school through adult-education creative writing teaching. Writing exercises, workshops, text evaluation, and visits from creative writers.

Engl 559. Creative Writing Teaching Internship. Cr. 1-3. Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in 558, permission of participating instructors. Students assist in an introductory creative writing class. Some supervised teaching but mainly evaluation of submissions and individual conferences. Requirements and grades determined by participating instructors.

Engl 560. Environmental Field Experience. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: Graduate classification. Students spend a term on a project that requires fieldwork. Projects might include working for a federal, state or private non-profit environmental organization or farm, or living and working in a specified natural area.

Engl 586. Visual Communication in Professional Writing. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: A course in business or technical communication. Rhetorical theory and research in graphics, document design, and related principles of visual communication. Methods of designing texts, data displays, illustrations, and other visual elements in business and technical communication.

Engl 587. Internship in Business, Technical, and Professional Communication. (3-0) Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. S. Prereq: 507 plus 3 additional graduate credits in business and technical writing or composition and rhetoric, permission of instructor. Limited to master's and doctoral degree candidates in the English Department. An opportunity to write, edit, and design business and technical documents in a professional setting. Projects include reports, proposals, manuals, brochures, newsletters.

Engl 588. Supervised Practicum in Teaching English as a Second Language. (Cross-listed with Ling). (1-5) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: 15 credits toward the TESL/Applied Linguistics master's degree. Intensive observation of ESL instruction and supervised practice in teaching learners of English in a context appropriate to the practicum student's goals. Seminar discussion of observed practices in relation to language teaching theories and methods.

Engl 589. Supervised Practicum in Literary Editing. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 552, at least one graduate creative writing workshop, permission of instructor. Students assume editorial duties for Flyway, a nationally distributed literary journal: overseeing a staff; screening submissions; corresponding with authors; editing and proofing; assisting with layout; communicating with the printer; overseeing a contest; and promoting the magazine.

Engl 590. Special Topics. Cr. arr. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of the Graduate Studies Committee according to guidelines available in the department office.
A. Literature
B. Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL)/Applied Linguistics. (Cross-listed with LING 590B)
C. Composition and Rhetoric
E. Rhetoric and Professional Communication
F. Creative Writing
G. Applied Linguistics and Technology

Engl 592. Studies in Rhetoric and Professional Communication. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: 12 hours in rhetoric, linguistics, or literature, excluding 150/250. Seminar on selected topics in rhetoric and professional communication or composition.

Engl 599. Creative Component. Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Graduate classification, permission of major professor.

Courses for graduate students

Engl 601. Research Methods in Rhetoric and Professional Communication. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 6 graduate credits in English. Survey of the major qualitative and quantitative methods used in research on communication and language in academic and nonacademic settings.

Engl 602. Research Design in Rhetoric and Professional Communication. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 601. A workshop for advanced graduate students in rhetoric and professional communication. Focus on qualitative and/or quantitative methods.

Engl 603. Seminar in Advanced Pedagogy in Rhetoric and Composition: Theory and Research. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 503 or 504. Exploration of relationships between theory and practice in current pedagogy. Intensive examination of contemporary theories of poststructuralism, new media, feminism, postcolonialism, or cultural studies and their impact on current pedagogical practice. Participation in pedagogical research and theory building.

Engl 611. Topics in the History of Rhetorical Theory. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 547 or 548. Rhetorical theory, criticism, and/or practice in relation to a historical period; the historical development of a rhetorical concept.

Engl 621. Topics in Current Rhetorical Theory. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. S. Prereq: 503 or 506. Advanced study of a specialized topic or problem in rhetorical theory, criticism, or practice.

Engl 623. Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 511, 517, 518, 519. Survey of research traditions in applied linguistics. Focus on theoretical and practical aspects of quantitative and qualitative approaches to applied linguistic study, including experimental and quasi-experimental methods, classroom observation and research, introspective methods, elicitation techniques, case studies, interactional analysis, ethnography, and program evaluation. Computational tools and resources for linguistic research will be highlighted.

Engl 626. Computer-Assisted Language Learning. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 510, 511, 517, 518. Principles and practice for the use and study of computers and the Internet in second language teaching and research.

Engl 630. Seminar in Technology and Applied Linguistics. (Cross-listed with Ling). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Engl 510, 511, 517, 518, others depend on the topic. Topic changes each semester. Topics include advanced methods in natural language processing, technology and literacy in a global context, feed back in CALL programs, and advances in language assessment.

Engl 688. Practicum in Technology and Applied Linguistics. (Cross-listed with Ling). (1-5) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Engl 510, 626, or equivalent; 2nd year PhD student. Focus on integrating theoretical knowledge with practical expertise. Assess client needs; develop, integrate, and evaluate solutions. Practical understanding of computer applications used in multimedia development. Create web-based or CD-ROM-based multimedia materials. Work with advanced authoring applications.

Engl 699. Research. Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Graduate classification, permission of major professor. Research.