Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2007-2009 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

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Chemical Engineering (Ch E)

200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses |

(Administered by the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering)

www.cbe.iastate.edu

James Hill, Chair of Department
Distinguished Professors: Reilly
Distinguished Professors (Emeritus): Burnet, Doraiswamy, Seagrave
UniversityProfessors: Hill
University Professors (Emeritus): Wheelock
Professors: Brown, Fox, Glatz, Hebert, Jolls, Kushner, Mallapragada, J. Shanks
Professors (Emeritus): Abraham, Boylan, Schrader, Ulrichson, Youngquist
Professors (Collaborators): Porter
Associate Professors: Hillier, Narasimhan, Rollins, B. Shanks, Vigil
Professors (Emeritus): Collins
Associate Professors (Adjunct): Hanneman
Assistant Professors: Clapp, Cochran, Lamm
Assistant Professors (Collaborators): Gonzalez

Undergraduate Study

For undergraduate curriculum in chemical engineering leading to the degree bachelor of science, see College of Engineering, Curricula. This curriculum is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Chemical engineering is a profession which provides a link between scientific knowledge and manufactured products. The chemical engineer relies on science, experience, creativity, and ingenuity to produce these materials economically. Almost everything of a material nature used by society today has at some point felt the influence of the chemical engineer. From raw materials such as minerals, coal, petroleum, and agricultural products, chemical engineers create versatile intermediate and commodity chemicals, high performance fuels, new materials for construction, pharmaceuticals, high performance foodstuffs, synthetic textiles, plastics, solid state electronic components, and dozens of other engineered materials. The chemical engineer's influence has been important in the development of catalysts, fuel cells, automatic controls, biochemical processes, artificial kidneys, tissue engineering, nuclear energy, medical instruments and devices, as well as in the development of air and water pollution control systems. Many new and equally exciting challenges await the practicing chemical engineer of the future.

The profession of chemical engineering embraces a wide variety of activities including research, process development, product development, design, manufacturing supervision, technical sales, consulting, and teaching. The engineer can be behind a desk, in a laboratory, in a manufacturing plant, or engaged in nationwide and worldwide travel.

Successful chemical engineers find chemistry, mathematics, and physics to be interesting and exciting. Many chemical engineers also have interest in the biological sciences. The curriculum in chemical engineering includes continued study of chemistry, mathematics, and physics as well as intensive study in the engineering sciences such as chemical reaction engineering, thermodynamics, mass transfer, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, system analysis and process synthesis, and design.

The curriculum in chemical engineering is designed to produce graduates that have the ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering; the ability to design, conduct and interpret experiments, and the ability to design a chemical engineering system, component, or process. Graduates should also have the ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams; the ability to identify, formulate, and solve chemical engineering problems; and the ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

The curriculum should also assure that graduates have the ability to communicate effectively, the broad education necessary to understand the impact of chemical engineering solutions in a global and societal context, and recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning, as well as a knowledge of contemporary issues and an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.

The curriculum assures that graduates have a thorough grounding in chemistry, along with a working knowledge of advanced chemistry such as organic, inorganic, physical, analytical, materials chemistry, or biochemistry. In addition, a working knowledge, including safety and environmental aspects, of material and energy balances applied to chemical processes; thermodynamics of physical and chemical equilibria; heat, mass, and momentum transfer; chemical reaction engineering; continuous and stage-wise separation operations; process dynamics and control; process design; and appropriate modern experimental and computing techniques is assured.

A significant number of chemical engineering graduates should have an ability to function as engineers in an international setting, and an ability to pursue research and advanced studies in chemical engineering, or in related fields such as medicine, law, and business.

A cooperative education program is available to students in chemical engineering. See Cooperative Programs, College of Engineering.

Graduate Study

The department offers work for the degrees master of science, master of engineering, and doctor of philosophy with major in chemical engineering, and minor work to students taking major work in other departments. Prerequisite to major graduate work is a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering, chemistry, or other related field. Students with undergraduate background other than chemical engineering should contact the department for further details. A thesis is required for the master of science degree. The master of science degree also requires a minimum of 30 graduate credits (minimum of 15 for coursework, 13 within Ch E and 2 outside). The master of engineering requirements are the same for credits and include a special project rather than research thesis. The doctor of philosophy degree requires a minimum of 72 graduate credits (minimum of 30 for coursework, 19 inside Ch E and a minimum of 8 credits taken outside of Ch E). Candidates for the doctor of philosophy degree can refer to the department's home page and/or the department's Graduate Student Handbook for degree options and credit requirements.

Courses open for nonmajor graduate credit: All 300 and 400 level courses except 302, 391, 392, 396, 397, 398, 490, 498, and 499.

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

Ch E 104. Chemical Engineering Learning Community. Cr. R. F.S. Prereq: Enrollment in Chemical Engineering Learning Team. (1-0) Curriculum in career planning and academic course support for Freshmen learning team.

Ch E 204. Chemical Engineering Continuing Learning Community. Cr. R. F.S. Prereq: Corequisite-enrollment in Chemical Engineering Learning Team. (1-0) Curriculum and career planning, academic course support for learning community.

Ch E 210. Material and Energy Balances. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Chem 178, Math 166. Introduction to chemical processes. Physical behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Application of material and energy balances to chemical engineering equipment and processes.

Ch E 298. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of department and Engineering Career Services. First professional work period in the cooperative education program. Students must register for this course before commencing work.

Ch E 302. Seminar. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Junior classification in chemical engineering.

Ch E 310. Computational Methods in Chemical Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 210 and Engr 160. Numerical methods for solving systems of linear and nonlinear equations, ordinary differential equations, numerical differentiation and integration, and nonlinear regression using chemical engineering examples. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 325. Chemical Engineering Laboratory I. (0-4) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: 357, credit or enrollment in 381. Experiments covering fundamental material and energy balances, momentum and energy transport operations, and thermodynamics. Computer applications. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 356. Transport Phenomena I. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 210, Phys 221, credit or enrollment in Math 267. Momentum and mechanical energy balances. Incompressible and compressible fluid flow. Applications to fluid drag, piping system design, filtration, packed beds and settling. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 357. Transport Phenomena II. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 310; 356. Conduction and diffusion, convective heat and mass transfer, boiling and condensation, radiation, and design of heat exchange equipment. Introduction to diffusion. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 358. Separations. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 310, 357. Diffusion and mass transfer in fluids. Analysis and design of continuous contacting and multistage separation processes. Binary and multicomponent distillation, absorption, extraction, evaporation, membrane processes, and simultaneous heat and mass transfer. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 381. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 310; Math 267, Phys 222, Chem 325. Application of thermodynamic principles to chemical engineering problems. Thermodynamic properties of fluids, phase equilibria, and chemical reaction equilibria. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 382. Chemical Reaction Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Credit in 310; 381, credit or enrollment in 357. Kinetics of chemical reactions. Design of homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactors. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 391. Foreign Study Orientation. Cr. 1-2. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 357 and 381 or permission of instructor. Credit for graduation allowable only upon completion of Ch E 392. Satisfactory-fail only.
A. Foreign Study Orientation ISU (1-0) Cr. 1. S.
B. Foreign Study Orientation Europe Cr. 2. SS.

Ch E 392. Foreign Study Program. Cr. 4. SS. Prereq: 391A, enrollment in 391B. Study of chemical engineering including laboratories and lectures at University College London or other collaborating international universities. Comparative study of U.S. and international manufacturing facilities. Expenses required.

Ch E 396. Summer Internship. Cr. R. Repeatable. SS. Prereq: Permission of department and Engineering Career Services. Summer professional work period. Students must register for this course prior to commencing work.

Ch E 397. Engineering Internship. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: Permission of department and Engineering Career Services. One semester maximum per academic year professional work period. Students must register for this course prior to commencing work.

Ch E 398. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: 298, permission of department and Engineering Career Services. Second professional work period in the cooperative education program. Students must register for this course before commencing work.

Ch E 406. Environmental Chemodynamics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 381, credit or enrollment in 358. Examines the mechanisms and rates of chemical transport across air, water, and soil interfaces. Applications of transport and thermodynamic fundamentals to movement of chemicals in the environment. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 408. Surface and Colloid Chemistry. (Dual-listed with 508). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 381 or equivalent. Examines the factors underlying interfacial phenomena, with an emphasis on the thermodynamics of surfaces, structural aspects, and electrical phenomena. Application areas include emulsification, foaming, detergency, sedimentaiton, fluidization, nucleation, wetting, adhesion, flotation, and electrophoresis. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 415. Biochemical Engineering. (Dual-listed with 515). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 357, 382 recommended, Chem 331. Application of basic chemical engineering principles in biochemical and biological process industries such as enzyme technology and fermentation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 421. Process Control. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 358, Math 267. Control of industrial chemical processes. Device applications and limitations. Dynamics of chemical process components and process control systems. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 426. Chemical Engineering Laboratory II. (0-4) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: 325, 358, 382. Experiments in heat and mass transfer, staged operations, chemical reactor performance, unit processes. Computer applications. Only one of Ch E 426 or 427 may count toward graduation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 427. Biological Engineering Laboratory. (0-4) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: Credit in 325, 358, 382 and BBMB 301. Experiments on biological applications in chemical engineering. Only one of Ch E 426 or 427 may count toward graduation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 430. Process and Plant Design. (2-6) Cr. 4. F.S. Prereq: 358, 382. Synthesis of chemical engineering processes, equipment and plants. Cost estimation and feasibility analysis. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 440. Biomedical Applications of Chemical Engineering. (Dual-listed with 540). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 210, Math 266, Phys 222. Applications of material and energy balances, transport phenomena, chemical reaction engineering, and thermodynamics to problems in biomedical engineering and applied physiology; survey of biomedical engineering; biomaterials; biomedical imaging. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 442. Polymers and Polymer Engineering. (Cross-listed with Mat E). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 382 and Chem 331 or Mat E 351. Chemistry of polymers, addition and condensation polymerization. Physical and mechanical properties, polymer rheology, production methods. Applications of polymers in the chemical industry. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Ch E 490. Independent Study. (0-3) Cr. 1-6. Repeatable. Introduction to research methods; investigation of an approved topic.
H. Honors

Ch E 498. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: 398, permission of department and Engineering Career Services. Third and subsequent professional work periods in the cooperative education program. Students must register for this course before commencing work.

Ch E 499. Undergraduate Research. (0-9) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of department. Research in chosen area of chemical engineering, with final written report. Students are encouraged to elect this course for two consecutive semesters. For students majoring in chemical engineering. No more than 6 credits of Ch E 499 may be counted toward graduation.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

Ch E 508. Surface and Colloid Chemistry. (Dual-listed with 408). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Examines the factors underlying interfacial phenomena, with an emphasis on the thermodynamics of surfaces, structural aspects, and electrical phenomena. Application areas include emulsification, foaming, detergency, sedimentation, fluidization, nucleation, wetting, adhesion, flotation, and electrophoresis. Term project required for graduate credit.

Ch E 515. Biochemical Engineering. (Dual-listed with 415). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 357, 382, Chem 331. Application of basic chemical engineering principles in biochemical and biological process industries such as enzyme technology and fermentation. Term project required for graduate credit.

Ch E 539. Fluidized Bed Processes. (Cross-listed with M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 357 or M E 436. Mass, momentum, and energy balances applied to fluidized beds. Hydrodynamics of bubbling, turbulent, and fast fluidized beds. Heat and mass transfer. Thermal and chemical processes in fluidized beds. Applications.

Ch E 540. Biomedical Applications of Chemical Engineering. (Dual-listed with 440). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 210, Math 266, Phys 222. Applications of material and energy balances, transport phenomena, chemical reaction engineering, and thermodynamics to problems in biomedical engineering and applied physiology; survey of biomedical engineering; biomaterials; biomedical imaging. Term project required for graduate credit.

Ch E 542. Polymeric Biomaterials. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Chem 331 or a polymers class. Polymeric biomaterials, overview of biomaterial requirements, different classes of polymers used as biomaterials, specific bioapplications of polymers.

Ch E 545. Analytical and Numerical Methods. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 358, Math 267. Analysis of equipment and processes by analytic and/or numerical solution of descriptive differential equations. Operational and series techniques, boundary value problems, numerical interpolation and approximation, integration techniques.

Ch E 554. Integrated Transport Phenomena. (4-0) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: 357, 381, Math 267, credit or enrollment in 545. Conservation equations governing diffusive and convective transport of momentum, thermal energy and chemical species. Transport during laminar flow in conduits, boundary layer flow, creeping flow. Heat and mass transport coupled with chemical reactions and phase change. Scaling and approximation methods for mathematical solution of transport models. Diffusive fluxes; conservation equations for heat and mass transfer; scaling and approximation techniques; fundamentals of fluid mechanics; unidirectional flow; creeping flow; laminar flow at high Reynolds number; forced-convection heat and mass transfer in confined and unconfined laminar flows.

Ch E 562. Bioseparations. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 357 or advanced standing in a science major. Principles and techniques for separation and recovery of biologically-produced molecules, especially proteins. Relationship between the chemistry of biological molecules and efficient separation and preservation of biological activity. Includes centrifugation and filtration, membrane processing, extraction, precipitation and crystallization, chromatography, and electrophoresis.

Ch E 572. Turbulence. (Cross-listed with Aer E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: Aer E 543 or M E 538. Qualitative features of turbulence. Statistical and spectral representation of turbulent velocity fields: averages, moments, correlations, length and time scales and the energy cascade. Averaged equations of motion, closure requirements, Reynolds stress, dissipation rate. Isotropic turbulence, homogeneous shear flows, free shear flows, wall bounded flows. Scalar transport, particulate transport.

Ch E 583. Advanced Thermodynamics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 381. Application of thermodynamic principles to chemical engineering problems. Thermodynamic properties of non-ideal fluids and solutions; phase and chemical-reaction equilibria/stability.

Ch E 587. Advanced Chemical Reactor Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 382. Analysis of complex reactions and kinetics. Fixed bed, fluidized bed, and other industrial reactors. Analysis and design of non-ideal flow mixing, and residence times. Heterogeneous reactors.

Ch E 590. Special Topics. Cr. 2-6. Repeatable. Investigation of an approved topic on an individual basis.

Ch E 595. Special Topics. Cr. 2-3. Repeatable.
A. Separations
B. Advanced Control Theory
C. Crystallization
D. Thermodynamics
G. Biological Engineering
I. Materials & Biomaterials
J. Protein Engineering/Bioseparations
K. Surfaces
L. Combinatorial Design

Ch E 599. Creative Component. Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Courses for graduate students

Ch E 601. Seminar. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.Satisfactory-fail only.

Ch E 625. Metabolic Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 382, Chem 331. Principles of metabolic engineering. Emphasis on emerging examples in biorenewables and plant metabolic engineering. Overview of biochemical pathways, determination of flux distributions by stoichiometric and labeling techniques; kinetics and thermodynamics of metabolic networks; metabolic control analysis; genetic engineering for overexpression, deregulation, or inhibition of enzymes; directed evolution; application of bioinformatics, genomics, and proteomics.

Ch E 632. Multiphase Flow. (Cross-listed with M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: M E 538. Single particle, mutliparticle and two-phase fluid flow phenomena (gas-solid, liquid-solid and gas-liquid mixtures); particle interactions, transport phenomena, wall effects; bubbles, equations of multiphase flow. Dense phase (fluidized and packed beds) and ducted flows; momentum, heat and mass transfer. Computer solutions.

Ch E 642. Principles and Applications of Molecular Simulation. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 545. Principles of statistical physics. General features of molecular simulations including Monte Carlo (MC) methods, molecular mechanics (MM), and molecular dynamics (MD). Overview of intermolecular and interatomic potentials. Evaluation of phase equilibria, free energies, and surface/interfacial properties. Coarse-grained methods.

Ch E 652. Advanced Transport. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 552 and 553. Advanced topics in momentum transport, fluid mechanics, and mass transport including study of recent literature.

Ch E 688. Catalysis and Catalytic Processes. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 382. Principles and applications of heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Adsorption. Reaction kinetics and mass transfer effects. Catalyst characterization. Industrial catalytic processes.

Ch E 690. Advanced Topics. Cr. arr. Repeatable.
A. Separations
B. Advanced Statistical Modeling and Control
C. Crystallization
D. Thermodynamics
E. Protein Engineering/Bioseparations
F. Biological Engineering
G. Materials & Biomaterials
H. Surfaces
I. Combinatorial Design

Ch E 697. Engineering Internship. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of major professor, graduate classification. One semester and one summer maximum per academic year professional work period.

Ch E 699. Research. Cr. arr. Repeatable.