Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2007-2009 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

Search for classes offered this term

Catalog Index

A| B| C | D| E| F| G| H| I | J| K| L| M| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z

Civil Engineering (C E)

200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses |

(Administered by the Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering)

James Alleman, Chair of Department
Distinguished Professors: Klaiber
Distinguished Professors (Emeritus): Baumann, Cleasby, Handy
University Professors (Emeritus): Lohnes
Professors: Alleman, Fanous, Jaselskis, Jeyapalan, Kannel, Maze, Ong, Porter, Sarkar, Schaefer, Souleyrette, Van Leeuwen, Wipf
Professors (Emeritus): Bergeson, Brewer, Carstens, Ekberg, Greimann, Hardy, Jellinger, Kao, Lee, Mashaw, Mickle, Morgan, Oulman, Sanders
Professors (Collaborators): McCoy, Surampalli
Associate Professors: Abendroth, Baenziger, Cable, Ellis, Gu, Hallmark, Jahren, Sritharan, Strong, Sung, Wang, Williams
Professors (Emeritus): Chase, Mercier, Sheeler, Ward
Assistant Professors: Bolluyt, Ceylan, Kandil, Rehmann, Shane, Walters, White
Assistant Professors (Adjunct): Phares, Plazak, Schlorholtz, Smadi
Instructors (Adjunct): Amenson, Gaunt
Senior Lecturers: Cormicle, Sirotiak, Walton
Lecturers: Jones, Stout, Suleiman
Clinician: Khanal

Undergraduate Study

For undergraduate curriculum in civil engineering leading to the degree bachelor of science, see College of Engineering, Curricula. This curriculum is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Civil engineering consists of the application of the laws, forces, and materials of nature to the planning, design, construction, maintenance, and operation of public and private facilities, subject to economic, social, and environmental constraints. Commonly included are transportation systems; bridges and buildings; water supply, pollution control, irrigation, and drainage systems; river and harbor improvements; dams and reservoirs. Civil engineering also includes the planning, design, and responsible execution of surveying operations, and the location, delimitation, and delineation of physical and cultural features on the surface of the earth. Research, testing, sales, management, and related functions are also a part of civil engineering. Work on the campus is supplemented by inspection trips which furnish an opportunity for firsthand study of engineering systems in operation, as well as projects under construction.

Environmental engineering, as a specialty area in civil engineering, is concerned with protecting the public and natural health; providing safe, palatable and ample water supply; management of solid and hazardous waste; proper treatment and disposal of domestic and industrial wastewaters and waste; resource recovery; providing adequate drainage of urban and rural areas for sanitation; and the control of water quality, soil contamination, and air pollution. At the undergraduate level, the study of various environmental and water resource engineering topics is part of the course of study leading to the Bachelor's degree in civil engineering.

Consultation with an industrial advisory board of employers of civil engineers, with a broad base of civil engineering educators, and with students and alumni has yielded a continuous process of program planning, program assessment, curriculum development, and instructional development to produce an integrated, learning-based curriculum. The curriculum listed in this catalog has the academic program goal of developing an effective program that fulfills student educational needs and that equips and empowers qualified students for a successful career in civil or environmental engineering.

Program Objectives

To achieve the program goal, the Department has developed objectives intended to result in the following outcomes such that graduates:

1. have a comprehensive education in the fundamentals of civil engineering,

2. are prepared to undertake civil engineering design tasks,

3. demonstrate effective communication skills and teamwork in multidisciplinary projects,

4. play a constructive role to address the needs of society and the environment, and

5. are motivated to continue their professional development.

The faculty encourages the development of the student's professional skills through participation in cooperative education, internships, or progressive summer engineering employment. Qualifed juniors and seniors interested in graduate studies may apply to the Graduate College to concurrently pursue the bachelor degree and an M.S. in Civil Engineering or an M.B.A. in the College of Business.

Graduate Study

The Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering offers work for the master of science and doctor of philosophy degrees with a major in civil engineering with areas of specialization in structural engineering, environmental engineering, construction engineering and management, geotechnical engineering, civil engineering materials, and transportation engineering. The department also offers minor work to students from other engineering departments.

Candidates for the degree master of science are required to satisfactorily complete 30 credits of acceptable graduate work, including preparation of a thesis or creative component.

Candidates for the doctor of philosophy degree refer to the department's home page and/or the department's Graduate Student Handbook for degree options and credit requirements.

The normal prerequisite to major graduate work is the completion of a curriculum substantially equivalent to that required of engineering students at this university. However, because of the diversity of interests within the graduate programs in civil engineering, a student may qualify for graduate study even though undergraduate or prior graduate training has been in a discipline other than engineering. Supporting work will be required depending upon the student's background and area of interest. A prospective graduate student is urged to specify the degree program and area of specialization in which he or she is interested on the application for admission.

The department participates in the interdepartmental majors in transportation (M.S. only), environmental science, and biorenewable resources and technology (see Index).

The Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering offers a graduate certificate in environmental engineering. Completion of the certificate requires at least twelve credits including 520, 521, 591 (R) seminar, and any two courses related to environmental engineering from those available from the Departments of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, Agriculture and Biosystems Engineering and Chemical and Biological Engineering.

Courses open for nonmajor graduate credit: all 300 and 400 level courses except 303, 304, 383, 396, 397, 398, 403, 420, 421, 428, 485, 486, 490, and 498.

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

C E 101. Technical Lecture. Cr. R. F.S. (1-0) Discussion of various phases of civil engineering. For transfer students only. Evaluation of transfer credits and discussion of graduation requirements. Satisfactory-fail only.

C E 104. Civil Engineering Projects. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S. Introduction to civil engineering projects and practices.

C E 111. Fundamentals of Surveying I. (2-3) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 160, credit or enrollment in Engr 170 or C E 170, Math 165, credit or enrollment in C E 104 for C E majors. Introduction to error theory. Fundamentals of observing distances, elevations, and angles. Traversing. Irregular areas. Circular and parabolic curves. Earthwork including mass diagrams. Construction staking. Computer applications and introduction to photogrammetry, geographic information systems and global positioning systems technology.

C E 160. Engineering Problems with Computational Laboratory. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Math 141, 142 or satisfactory scores on mathematics placement examinations; credit or enrollment in Math 165. Formulation of engineering problems using spreadsheets and Visual Basic for Application for solution. Presenting results using word processing, tables, and graphs. Introduction to engineering economics and statics. Civil engineering examples.

C E 170. Graphics for Civil Engineering. (0-4) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: Math 165, credit or enrollment in 104. Fundamental graphics. Introduction to computer aided drafting and modeling. Civil engineering applications.

C E 203. Civil Engineering Synthesis I. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: 104, 160, credit or enrollment in Engl 250, Chem 167 or 177. Concepts and applications of engineering economics. Technical communication for civil engineers. Introduction to critical thinking as related to Bloom's Taxonomy of educational objectives. Creativity and lateral thinking. Aesthetics and the golden ratio. Introduction to self-directed learning. Application of sustainability and environmental concepts for the solution of civil engineering problems. Teamwork.

C E 204. Civil Engineering Synthesis II. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: 111, 203, Phys 221. Applied engineering economics. Technical communication for civil engineers. Application of critical thinking processes for problem solutions. Self-directed learning. Application of mathematics and chemistry concepts for the solution of civil engineering problems. Sophomore assessment.

C E 298. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of department and Engineering Career Services. First professional work period in the cooperative education program. Students must register for this course before commencing work. Satisfactory-fail only.

C E 303. Professional Issues in Civil Engineering. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: 204, Sp Cm 212. Professionalism. Licensure. Engineering ethics. Professional liability. Leadership. Engineering business management principles. Engineering economics. Civil engineering history and heritage. Critical thinking and reinforcement of Bloom's Taxonomy of educational objectives.

C E 304. Civil Engineering Project Management. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: 303. Project management, including work breakdown structures, cost estimating, scheduling, and project control. Civil engineering project life cycle, including planning, design, construction, and maintenance processes. Junior assessment.

C E 326. Principles of Environmental Engineering. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Chem 167 or 178, Math 166, credit or enrollment in E M 378. Introduction to environmental problems, water quality indicators and requirements, potable water quality and quantity objectives, water sources and treatment methods; water pollution control objectives and treatment methods; survey of solid and hazardous waste management and air pollution control. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 332. Structural Analysis I. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: E M 324. Loads, shear, moment, and deflected shape diagrams for beams and framed structures. Approximate methods. Deformation calculations. Application of flexibility methods to frames and continuous beams. Application of moment distribution and stiffness methods to continuous beams and braced frames. Influence lines for determinate and indeterminate beams using Muller-Breslau principle. Computer applications to analyze beams and frames. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 333. Structural Steel Design I. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 332, E M 327. Design and behavior of the elements of steel structures, proportioning members and connections using load and resistance factor design. Introduction to allowable stress design. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 334. Reinforced Concrete Design I. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: 332, E M 327. Analysis and design of beams, one-way slabs, and columns. Preliminary design of building frames using pattern loading and moment coefficients. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 350. Introduction to Transportation Planning. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 3 credits in statistics, junior classification. An introductory course for planning urban and regional transporation systems within government. Applications and impacts of legislation, financing, four-step planning process, population trends, land use, societal impacts, public transportation, master plans and traffic impact studies. Organization and coordination of the transportation planning function. Term paper and class participation required. Not available for graduation credit for students in civil engineering.

C E 355. Principles of Transportation Engineering. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: 111, 203, Phys 221, a course in statistics from the approved departmental list. Introduction to planning and operations of transportation facilities. Vehicle/operation/infrastructure characteristics. Technological, economic and environmental factors. Travel demand modeling and capacity analysis.

C E 360. Soil Engineering. (2-3) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: E M 324, credit or enrollment in Geol 201. Introduction to soil engineering and testing. Identification and classification tests, soil water systems, principles of settlement, stresses in soils, and shear strength testing; slope stability, retaining walls, bearing capacity. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 372. Engineering Hydrology and Hydraulics. (3-2) Cr. 4. F.S. Prereq: E M 378, a course in statistics from the approved department list. The hydrologic cycle: precipitation, infiltration, runoff, evapotranspiration, groundwater, and streamflow. Hydrograph analysis, flood routing, frequency analysis and urban hydrology. Applied hydraulics including pipe and channel flow with design applications in culverts, pumping, water distribution, storm and sanitary sewer systems. Design project required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 382. Design of Concretes. (2-3) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 360. Physical and chemical properties of bituminous, portland, and other cements; aggregate properties and blending; mix design and testing of concretes; admixtures, mixing, handling, placing and curing; principles of pavement thickness design. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 383. Design of Portland Cement Concrete. (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 360. For Con E students only. Physical and chemical properties of portland cement and p.c. concrete. Mix design and testing of p.c. concrete.

C E 388. Sustainable Engineering and International Development. (Cross-listed with A E, E E). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Junior classification in engineering. Multi-disciplinary approach to sustainable engineering and international development, sustainable development, appropriate design and engineering, feasibility analysis, international aid, business development, philosophy and politics of technology, and ethics in engineering. Engineering-based projects from problem formulation through implementation. Interactions with partner community organizations or international partners such as nongovernment organizations (NGOs). Course readings, final project/design report.

C E 396. Summer Internship. Cr. R. Repeatable. SS. Prereq: Permission of department and Engineering Career Services, completion of two terms in residence in civil engineering, employment in civil engineering or related field. Summer professional work period. Students must register for this course prior to commencing work. Satisfactory-fail only.

C E 397. Engineering Internship. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: Permission of department and Engineering Career Services. One semester maximum per academic year professional work period. Students must register for this course prior to commencing work. Satisfactory-fail only.

C E 398. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: 298, permission of department and Engineering Career Services. Second professional work period in the cooperative education program. Students must register for this course before commencing work. Satisfactory-fail only.

C E 403. Program and Outcome Assessment. Cr. R. F.S. Prereq: Verification of undergraduate application for graduation by the end of the first week of class. Permission of instructor for students who are scheduled for summer graduation. Assessment of CE Curriculum and educational objectives. Satisfactory-fail only.

C E 417. Land Surveying. (2-3) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 111. Legal principles affecting the determination of land boundaries, public domain survey systems. Locating sequential and simultaneous conveyances. Record research, plat preparation, and land description. Study of selected court cases. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 420. Environmental Engineering Chemistry. (Dual-listed with 520). (2-3) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Chem 177 and 178, Math 166. Principles of chemical and physical phenomena applicable to the treatment of water and wastewater and natural waters; including chemical equilbria, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria, chemical precipitation, redox reactions, and mass transfer principles. Individual laboratory practicals and group projects required.

C E 421. Environmental Biotechnology. (Dual-listed with 521). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 326. Fundamentals of biochemical and microbial processes applied to environmental engineering processes, role of microorganisms in wastewater treatment and bioremediation, bioenergetics and kinetics, metabolism of xenobiotic compounds, waterborne pathogens, parasites, and disinfection.

C E 428. Water and Wastewater Treatment Plant Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 326. Physical, chemical and biological processes for the treatment of water and wastewater including coagulation and flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, adsorption, chemical oxidation/disinfection, fixed film and suspended growth biological processes and sludge management.

C E 446. Bridge Design. (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 333, 334. Bridge design in structural steel and reinforced concrete. Application of AASHTO Bridge Design Specifications. Analysis techniques for complex structures. Preliminary designs include investigating alternative structural systems and materials. Final designs include preparation of design calculations and sketches. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 447. Building Design. (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 333, 334. Building design in structural steel and reinforced concrete. Investigation of structural behavior of frameworks. Lateral load resisting systems. Application of current building codes and design specifications. Review of building designs. Preliminary designs include investigating alternative structural systems. Final designs include preparation of design calculations and sketches. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 451. Urban Transportation Planning Models. (Dual-listed with 551). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 350 or 355. Urban transportation planning context and process. Project planning and programming. Congestion, mitigation, and air quality issues. Transportation data sources. Travel demand and network modeling. Use of popular travel demand software and applications of geographic information systems. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 453. Highway Design. (3-3) Cr. 4. F.S. Prereq: 304, 355, 372, 382. Introduction to traffic engineering and highway planning. Design, construction, and maintenance of highway facilities; earthwork, drainage structures; pavements. Preparation of environmental impact statement. A complete design project is required. Oral and written reports. Computer applications. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 460. Foundations. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 360. Fundamentals of foundation engineering. Exploration, sampling, and in-situ tests. Shallow and deep foundations. Settlement and bearing capacity analyses. Stability of excavations and earth retaining structures. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 473. Groundwater Hydrology. (Dual-listed with 573). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 372. Principles of groundwater flow, hydraulics of wells, super-position, slug and pumping tests, streamlines and flownets, and regional groundwater flow. Contaminant transport. Computer modeling. Nonmajor graduate credit.

C E 485. Civil Engineering Design I. (1-2) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: 304, credit or enrollment in 326, credit or enrollment in 333 or 334, 355, Sp Cm 212. The civil engineering design process, interacting with the client, identification of the engineering problems, development of a technical proposal, identification of design criteria, cost estimating, planning and scheduling, codes and standards, development of feasible alternatives, selection of best alternative, oral presentation and poster.

C E 486. Civil Engineering Design II. (1-4) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 326, 333 or 334, 382, 485, credit or enrollment in 428 or 453. The engineering design computations, case histories of design inadequacies, environmental impact, safety and health in the work place, ethics, contract documents, design plans and specifications, teamwork, synthesis of previous coursework in a group project, oral presentations.

C E 490. Independent Study. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Independent study in any phase of civil engineering. Pre-enrollment contract required.
H. Honors

C E 498. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: 398, permission of department and Engineering Career Services. Third and subsequent professional work periods in the cooperative education program. Students must register for this course before commencing work. Satisfactory-fail only.

Courses primarily for graduate studnets, open to qualified undergraduate students

C E 501. Preconstruction Project Engineering and Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Con E 221 and 421. Application of engineering and management control techniques to construction project development from conceptualization to notice to proceed. Determinants of construction project success, conceptual estimating, design and engineering planning for automated construction techniques, constructability review procedures, planning for safety, value engineering.

C E 502. Construction Project Engineering and Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Con E 221 and 421. Application of engineering and management control techniques to construction projects. Construction project control techniques, equipment selection and utilization, project administration, construction process simulation, Quality Management, and productivity improvement programs.

C E 503. Construction Management Functions and Processes. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Con E 421. Analysis of critical construction management skills. Analysis of organizational systems related to construction management. Case studies. Analysis of theories of motivation, planning, leadership, organizational change, etc., as they relate to field construction operations.

C E 505. Design of Construction Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 334, 360, Con E 322 and 340. Advanced design of concrete formwork and falsework systems. Design for excavation and marine construction including temporary retaining structures and cofferdams. Aggregate production operations, including blasting, crushing, and conveying systems. Rigging system design.

C E 506. Case Histories in Construction Documents. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Con E 221, credit or enrollment in Con E 421. Study of cases involving disputes, claims, and responsibilities encountered by management in construction contract documents. Analysis of methods of resolving differences among the owner, architect, engineer, and construction contractor for a project.

C E 510. Information Technologies for Construction. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Con E 421, Engr 160 or C E 160 or equivalent. Information technologies including microcomputer based systems, management information systems, automation technologies, computer-aided design, and expert systems and their application in the construction industry. Overview of systems acquisition, communications, and networking.

C E 513. Geodetic and Satellite Surveying. (2-3) Cr. 3. Prereq: 111. Triangulation and trilateration observation and computation. Precise leveling. Electronic distance measuring instrument calibration. Geodetic astronomy for latitude and longitude determination. Global positioning systems of satellite observation and computation.

C E 517. Analytical Photogrammetry and Geographic Information Systems. (2-3) Cr. 3. Prereq: 111. Theory and practice of stereoplotting systems. Planning and execution of photogrammetric projects. Concepts, principles, and methods of analytical photogrammetry. Creation of digital terrain models and basemaps for geographic information systems (GIS). Use of computer aided design and GIS software.

C E 520. Environmental Engineering Chemistry. (Dual-listed with 420). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-3) Cr. 3. Prereq: Chem 177 and 178, Math 166. Principles of chemical and physical phenomena applicable to the treatment of water and wastewater and natural waters; including chemical equilibria, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria, chemical precipitation, redox reactions and mass transfer principles. Individual and group projects required. Additional term paper and oral presentation. Laboratory practicals.

C E 521. Environmental Biotechnology. (Dual-listed with 421). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: 326. Fundamentals of biochemical and microbial processes applied to environmental engineering processes, role of microorganisms in wastewater treatment and bioremedication, bioenergetics and kinetics, metabolism of xenobiotic compounds, waterborne pathogens and parasites, and disinfection. Additional term paper and oral presentation.

C E 522. Water Pollution Control Processes. (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: 521. Fundamentals of biochemical processes, aerobic growth in a single CSTR, multiple events in complex systems, and techniques for evaluating kinetic parameters; unit processes of activated sludge system, attached growth systems, stabilization and aerated lagoon systems, biosolids digestion and disposal, nutrient removal, and anaerobic treatment systems.

C E 523. Physical-Chemical Treatment Process. (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: C E 520. Principles and design of physical-chemical unit processes; including coagulation, flocculation, chemical precipitation, sedimentation, filtration, lime softening and stabilization, adsorption, membrane processes, ion exchange and disinfection; laboratory exercises and demonstrations. Individual and group projects required.

C E 524. Air Pollution. (Cross-listed with EnSci, A E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Two of Phys 221, Chem 178 and either Math 166 or 3 credits in statistics. Air quality legislation. Sources and effects of pollutants. Physics and chemistry of air pollution. Modeling point sources. Global warming, ozone depletion, meteorological and geographic aspects. Indoor air quality. Volatile organic compounds. Odor and air analysis. Optional sessions: a) air pollution control, b) transportation pollution, c) aerial emissions from agriculture.

C E 525. Industrial Wastewater and Resource Recovery. (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Two chemistry courses, Math 166. Water management improvement in industry, pollution reduction at source. Material and energy balances. Industrial wastewater treatment and process selection. Recovery of metals by oxidation/reduction, precipitation, filtration, adsorption and ion exchange. Recovery or conversion of organic materials in wastewater into useful byproducts by bioprocessing. Recovery of resources from biomass and sludges. Extensive case studies.

C E 527. Solid Waste Management. (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 326. Planning and design of solid waste management systems; includes characterization and collection of domestic, commercial, and industrial solid wastes, waste minimization and recycling, energy and materials recovery, composting, incineration, and landfill design.

C E 529. Hazardous Waste Management. (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: C E 326. Regulatory requirements for the classification, transport, storage and treatment of hazardous wastes. Analysis and design of alternatives for treatment and disposal technologies, including physical, chemical, and biological treatment, solidification, incineration, and secure landfill design. Regulatory requirements and procedures for hazardous waste contaminated site investigations and risk analysis. Analysis and design of remedial action alternatives for site restoration.

C E 532. Structural Analysis II. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 332. Displacements by virtual work, unit load. Analysis of indeterminate structural problems by the force and stiffness methods. Direct stiffness method for 2-D frames, grids, 3-D frames. Additional topics for the stiffness method.

C E 533. Structural Steel Design II. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 333. Every third semester, offered S 2008. Development of the AISC design equations for and the design of tension members, columns, beams, beam-columns, and plate girders by LRFD and ASD methods. Elastic and inelastic buckling of members and member elements. Torsion of W-shapes.

C E 534. Reinforced Concrete Design II. (2-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: 334. Every third semester, offered F 2007. Design of reinforced concrete long columns, floor slabs, building frames, isolated footings and combined footings. Design and behavior considerations for torsion, biaxial bending, structural joints and shear friction. Introduction to cold-formed composite steel and composite floor slab design.

C E 535. Prestressed Concrete Structures. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 334. Every third semester, offered S 2008. Design of prestressed concrete structures, review of hardware, stress calculations, prestress losses, deflections, shear design, section proportioning, statically indeterminate structures, special topics.

C E 536. Masonry and Timber Design. (2-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: 334. Every third semester, offered F 2008. Behavior and design of clay and concrete masonry beams, columns, walls, and structural systems. Behavior and design of timber and laminated timber beams, columns, connections, and structural systems.

C E 541. Dynamic Analysis of Structures. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: E M 345 and credit or enrollment in 532. Every third semester, offered F 2008. Single and multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Free and forced vibrations. Linear and nonlinear response. Modal analysis. Response spectra. Seismic analysis.

C E 542. Structural Analysis by Finite Elements. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 532. Use of the finite element method for the analysis of complex structural configurations. Plane stress, plate and shell finite elements. General purpose finite element programs.

C E 545. Seismic Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 333, 334. Every third semester, offered F 2007. Seismic hazard in the United States. Engineering characteristics of ground motions. Structural damage in past earthquakes. Capacity design philosophy for seismic resistant design. Conceptual design of structures. Capacity design process including design of structural members.

C E 547. Analysis and Design of Plate and Slab Structures. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 334, E M 514, Math 266. Bending and buckling of thin plate components in structures utilizing classical and energy methods. Analysis of shell roofs by membrane and bending theories.

C E 550. Advanced Highway Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 453. Evaluation of rural and urban street and highway design theory. Establishment of design criteria, application to street and highway systems, and to intersections and interchanges; drainage design, and urban freeway design aspects. Computer applications.

C E 551. Urban Transportation Planning Models. (Dual-listed with 451). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 350 or 355. Urban transportation planning context and process. Project planning and programming. Congestion, mitigation, and air quality issues. Transportation data sources. Travel demand and network modeling. Use of popular travel demand software and applications of geographc information systems. Term project required for graduate credit.

C E 552. Traffic Safety, Operations, and Maintenance. (2-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: 355. Engineering aspects of highway traffic safety. Reduction of accident incidence and severity through highway design and traffic control. Accident analysis. Legal implications. Safety in highway design, maintenance, and operation.

C E 553. Traffic Engineering. (2-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: 355. Driver, pedestrian, and vehicular characteristics. Traffic characteristics; highway capacity; traffic studies and analyses. Principles of traffic control for improved highway traffic service. Application of intersection, corridor or network analysis computer evaluation and optimization tools.

C E 554. Advanced Technology in Transportation. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 350, 355, graduate standing in transportation or civil engineering or consent of instructor. Advanced traffic control systems including signal systems technology and field assets. Regional traffic management and communications centers. Traffic surveillance, monitoring and incident management. Advanced traveler information systems. The automated highway.

C E 555. Advanced Traffic Operations. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 553. Solve real-world traffic engineering problems; explore interactions between traffic systems components; advanced skills related to signal timing, coordination, and optimization; practical applications of common traffic engineering tools.

C E 557. Transportation Systems Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 355, 3 credits in statistics or probability. Travel studies and analysis of data. Travel projections. Public transportation forecasts and analyses. Statewide, regional, and local transportation system planning. Corridor travel planning. Optimization of systems.

C E 558. Transportation Systems Development and Management Laboratory. (2-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: 350 or 355. Study of designated problems in traffic engineering, urban transportation planning, and urban development. Forecasting and evaluation of social, economic, and environmental impact of proposed solutions; considerations of alternatives. Formulation of recommendations and publication of a report. Presentation of recommendations in the host community.

C E 559. Transportation Infrastructure/Asset Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 355 or 453, 382. Engineering management techniques for maintaining and managing infrastructure assets. Systematic approach to management through value engineering, engineering economics, and life cycle cost analysis. Selection and scheduling of maintenance activities. Analysis of network-wide resource needs. Project level analysis.

C E 560. Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 360. Limiting stress analysis, stress paths, introduction to critical state soil mechanics, constitutive models, soil strength under various drainage conditions, seepage, pore pressure parameters, consolidation, slope stability and retaining wall applications.

C E 561. Applied Foundation Engineering. (2-3) Cr. 3. Prereq: 460. Lateral earth pressure theories and retaining structures. Field investigations, in-situ testing, foundations on expansive soils, and analysis and design of shallow and deep foundations. Foundation engineering reports.

C E 562. Site Evaluations for Civil Engineering Projects. (2-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: 360. Identification and mapping of engineering soils from airphotos. Use of remote sensing and GIS, planning subsurface investigations, geomaterials prospecting, water resource applications.

C E 564. Application of Numerical Methods to Geotechnical Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 560. Application of numerical methods to analysis and design of foundations, underground structures, and soil-structure interaction. Application of slope stability software. Layered soils, bearing capacity and settlement for complex geometries, wave equation for piles, and foundation vibrations.

C E 565. Fundamentals of Geomaterials Behavior. (2-3) Cr. 3. Prereq: 382. Atoms and molecules, crystal chemistry, clay minerals, structure of solids, phase transformations and phase equilibria. Surfaces and interfacial phenomena, colloid chemistry, mechanical properties. Applications to soils and civil engineering materials. Overview of state-of-the-art instrumental techniques for analysis of the physicochemical properties of soils and civil engineering materials.

C E 567. Geomaterials Stabilization. (2-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: 565. Soil and aggregate physical and chemical stabilization procedures. Soil stabilization analysis and design. Ground modification methods. Geosynthetics application and design.

C E 569. Environmental Geotechnology. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 360. Soil/water and soil/water/contaminant interaction. Geoenvironmental site investigation and site assessment technologies. Hazardous waste landfill design, construction and performance, focusing on liner and cover systems. Hazardous waste site remediation.

C E 570. Applied Hydraulic Design. (2-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: 372. Flow characteristics in natural and constructed channels; principles of hydraulic design of culverts, bridge waterway openings, spillways, hydraulic gates and gated structures, pumping stations, and miscellaneous water control structures; pipe networks, mathematical modeling. Design project.

C E 571. Surface Water Hydrology. (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 372. Analysis of hydrologic data including precipitation, infiltration, evapotranspiration, direct runoff and streamflow; theory and use of frequency analysis; theory of streamflow and reservoir routing; use of deterministic and statistical hydrologic models. Fundamentals of surface water quality modeling, point and non-point sources of contamination. Design project.

C E 572. Analysis and Modeling Aquatic Environments. (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: C E 571. Principles of surface water flows and mixing. Introduction to hydrologic transport and water quality simulation in natural water systems. Advection, diffusion and dispersion, chemical and biologic kinetics, and water quality dynamics. Applications to temperature, dissolved oxygen, primary productivity, and other water quality problems in rivers, lakes and reservoirs. Deterministic vs. stochastic models.

C E 573. Groundwater Hydrology. (Dual-listed with 473). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 372. Principles of groundwater flow, hydraulics of wells, super-position, slug and pumping tests, streamlines and flownets, and regional groundwater flow. Contaminant transport. Computer modeling. Individual and group projects.

C E 574. Environmental Impact Assessment. (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 4 courses in natural, biological or engineering sciences and senior or above classification. Review of federal and state requirements for environmental impact assessment, requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act and Council on Environmental Quality, methods of evaluating the environmental impacts on the physical, biological, socioeconomic, cultural/historical, human health and psychological environments, public participation in EIS, review and evaluate project environmental impact statements. An environmental impact assessment of a proposed project will be completed in small teams.

C E 581. Geotechnical and Materials Engineering Seminar. Cr. R. Repeatable. Prereq: Graduate classification. (1-0) Students and outside/invited speakers give weekly presentations about the ongoing research work and Geotechnical and Materials Engineering issues. Satisfactory-fail only.

C E 582. Advanced Pavement Analysis and Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 382. Analysis, behavior, performance, and structural design of pavement systems; topics include climate factors, rehabilitation, life cycle design economics, material and system response, and traffic loadings. Development of models for and analysis of pavement systems; use of transfer functions relating pavement response to pavement performance; evaluation and application of current and evolving pavement design practices and procedures; analysis of the effects of maintenance activities on pavement performance; and economic evaluation of pavement systems.

C E 586. Advanced Asphalt Materials. (2-3) Cr. 3. Prereq: 382. Advanced asphalt concrete (SUPERPAVE) mix designs. Aggregates. Admixtures. Production and construction, quality control and inspection. Nondestructive testing. Pavement thickness design. Materials engineering reports.

C E 587. Advanced Portland Cement Concretes. (2-3) Cr. 3. Prereq: 382 or 383. Hydraulic cements, aggregates, admixtures, and mix design; concrete production, quality control, early-age properties and durability. Concrete distress examination, identification, prevention, and nondestructive testing; advanced concrete technology, high-strength and high performance concrete.

C E 590. Special Topics. Cr. 1-5. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Pre-enrollment contract required.

C E 591. Seminar in Environmental Engineering. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: Graduate classification. (1-0) Contemporary environmental engineering issues. Outside speakers. Review of ongoing research in environmental engineering. Satisfactory-fail only.

C E 594. Special Topics in Construction Engineering and Management. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. Prereq: Con E 322, Con E 340 or C E 304, and permission of instructor. Emphasis for a particular offering will be selected from the following topics:
A. Planning and Scheduling
B. Computer Applications for Planning and Scheduling
C. Cost Estimating
D. Computer Applications for Cost Estimating
E. Project Controls
F. Computer Applications for Project Controls
G. Integration of Planning, Scheduling and Project Controls
J. Trenchless Technologies
K. Electrical and Mechanical Construction
L. Advanced Building Construction Topics
M. Design Build Construction
N. Industrial Construction
O. Highway and Heavy Construction
P. Advanced Technologies

C E 595. Research Methods in Construction Engineering and Management. (0-1) Cr. 1. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 501, 502, 503, or 505. Assigned readings and reports on research methods to solve construction engineering and management problems such as robotics, project controls, automation, etc. Identification of research methods and priorities, selection and development of research design, and critique of research in construction engineering and management.

C E 599. Creative Component. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. Pre-enrollment contract required. Advanced topic for creative component report in lieu of thesis.

Courses for graduate students

C E 622. Advanced Topics in Environmental Engineering. (2-0) Cr. 2. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of environmental engineering graduate faculty. Advanced concepts in environmental engineering. Emphasis for a particular offering will be selected from the following topics:
A. Water Pollution Control
B. Water Treatment
C. Solid and Hazardous Waste
D. Water Resources

C E 649. Advanced Topics in Structural Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of structural engineering graduate faculty. Advanced concepts in structural engineering topics. Emphasis for a particular offering will be selected from the following topics:
A. Behavior of Metal Structures
B. Design of Concrete Shells
D. Advanced Matrix Analysis of Structures
E. Dynamic Design of Structures
F. Reliability Assessment of Structures.

C E 690. Advanced Topics. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Pre-enrollment contract required.

C E 697. Engineering Internship. Cr. R. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of coop advisor, graduate classification. One semester and one summer maximum per academic year professional work period. Satisfactory-fail only.

C E 699. Research. Cr. 1-30. Repeatable. Prereq: Pre-enrollment contract required. Advanced topic for thesis/dissertation.