Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2007-2009 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

Search for classes offered this term

Catalog Index

A| B| C | D| E| F| G| H| I | J| K| L| M| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z

Agronomy (Agron)

200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses |

Kendall Lamkey, Interim Chair of Department
Distinguished Professors: Fehr, Horton
Distinguished Professors (Emeritus): Bremner, Frey, Hallauer, Pesek, Russell, Shaw
Professors: P. Anderson, Arritt, Barnhart, Chen, Cianzio, Cruse, Elmore, Fales, Gallus, Gutowski, Hartzler, Killorn, Lamkey, Lee, Liebman, Loynachan, Mallarino, Miller, Moore, Mullen, Owen, P. Peterson, T. Peterson, Sandor, Schnable, Tabatabai, Takle, Taylor, M. Thompson, Wang, Westgate, Wolt
Professors (Emeritus): I. Anderson, M. Anderson, Atkins, Benson, Burris, I. Carlson, R. Carlson, Fenton, George, Green, Hodges, Imsande, Keeney, Larson, Pearce, Schafer, Schaller, A. Scott, Shibles, Shrader, Skrdla, Stritzel, H. Thompson, L. Thompson, Troeh, Voss, Wedin, Whigham, Woolley, Yarger
Professors (Collaborators): Hatfield, Jaynes, Karlen, Kaspar, Laird, Masters, Palmer, Shoemaker
Associate Professors: Al-Kaisi, Becraft, Bhattacharyya, Burras, Dekker, Delate, Gibson, Jannink, Knapp, Manu, Sawyer, Wiedenhoeft
Associate Professors (Collaborators): Cambardella, Grant, Kovar, Logsdon, Moorman, Olson, Pollak, M. Scott
Assistant Professors: Goggi, Henning, Hornbuckle, Pedersen, Polito
Assistant Professors (Collaborators): Andrews, Blanco, Edwards, Gardner, Guan, Lawrence, Perdomo, Sauer, Singer, Widrlechner
Lecturers: Ciha, McAndrews, Zdorkowski

Undergraduate Study

For undergraduate curriculum in agronomy, see College of Agriculture, Curricula. The Department of Agronomy provides a curriculum for students interested in crop science, soil science, agricultural meteorology and environmental science.

Students selecting agronomy as a major will elect an option in agronomy management and business, agroecology, soil and environmental science, plant breeding and biotechnology, or research and development.

Graduates have the theoretical and practical knowledge needed for efficient and sustainable production of food, feed, and fiber. They have a broad understanding of the role and diversity of plants, soils, and climates of the world. Graduates are skilled in communications, critical thinking, problem solving, and working effectively with others. Students develop these skills in our required courses. They understand the ethical, cultural, and environmental dimensions of issues facing professionals in agriculture and natural resources.

An agronomy major prepares students for employment in agricultural business and industry, agricultural service organizations, crop production and soil management, environmental and natural resource management, farm management, and governmental agencies. Graduates pursue careers in the seed, fertilizer, and agricultural chemical industries as field agronomists, crop and soil management specialists, research technicians, sales and marketing specialists, and production managers. State and federal agencies employ agronomists as extension specialists, county extension directors, environmental and natural resource specialists, research associates, soil surveyors, soil conservationists, and in regulatory agencies as plant, food, and grain inspectors. Additional areas of work open to agronomists include integrated pest management, land appraisal, agricultural finance, turfgrass management, and the home lawn care industry. A minimum of 15 credits of agronomy courses must be earned at Iowa State for students transferring from other institutions.

The department offers work for a minor in agronomy. Students are required to complete an approved minor program that includes Agron 114, 154, 212, 354, and 6 additional credits, of which a minimum of 3 credits must be at the 300+ level. 9 credits for the agronomy minor must be earned at Iowa State. Students work with an agronomy adviser to select courses in crops, soils, and meteorology that are appropriate to their career goals. A list of approved courses is available from an agronomy adviser.

Students can also design a strong basic science education in crop science, soil science, agricultural meteorology, or biotechnology to prepare themselves for science-based jobs, graduate study, or for research careers.

Graduate Study

The department offers programs that lead to the degrees master of science and doctor of philosophy, with majors in agricultural meteorology; crop production and physiology with optional specializations in seed science and weed science; plant breeding; and soil science with specialization in soil chemistry, soil fertility, soil management, soil microbiology and biochemistry, soil morphology and genesis, or soil physics. Minor work is offered for students with majors in other departments. A M.S. nonthesis option is available for students desiring a general degree program with additional coursework and a written creative component substituting for thesis research. The nonthesis option is not intended to prepare students for entering a Ph.D. program.

Graduates have a broad knowledge base germane to their area of study. They are trained to integrate and apply knowledge to different situations. Students develop skills in scientific reasoning, organization, and logical presentation of ideas. A master of science degree in agronomy designed for the continuing education of professional agronomists is offered by the department. The program is taught at a distance using computer-based instructional media. It is a nonthesis degree requiring completion of a written creative component.

The department cooperates in the interdepartmental program in professional agriculture; interdepartmental majors in ecology and evolutionary biology, genetics, MCDB (molecular, cellular, and developmental biology), plant physiology, sustainable agriculture, and environmental science. Prerequisite to major work in this department is completion of an undergraduate degree program with emphasis on agronomic, biological, and physical sciences. The foreign language requirement, if any, for the Ph.D. degree is established on an individual basis by the program of study committee appointed to guide the work of the student.

Courses open for nonmajor graduate credit: 306, 334, 342, 351, 351L, 354, 356, 402, 402I, 404, 406, 421, 434, 452, 473, 473I, 485, 493.

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

Agron 105. Leadership Experience. Cr. R. F.S.SS. A participatory experience in activities or completion of a course that enhances the development of leadership and group-dynamic skills. See adviser for departmental requirements.

Agron 110. Professional Development in Agronomy: Orientation. Cr. 0.5. F. Orientation to college life, the profession of agronomy, and the agronomy curriculum. Satisfactory-fail only.

Agron 114. Principles of Agronomy. (2-3) Cr. 3. F.S. Mullen. A foundation course in crop production and soil management principles for the basic agronomic crops. Includes introductory concepts of plant, soil, tillage, pest, environmental, and sustainable aspects of crop production. Off-campus version offered through internet by interactive computer courseware.

Agron 120. Introduction to Renewable Resources. (Cross-listed with Env S, NREM). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Overview of soil, water, plants, and animals as renewable natural resources in an ecosystem context. History and organization of resource management. Concepts of integrated resource management.

Agron 154. Fundamentals of Soil Science. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Chem 163. Manu. Introduction to physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils, their formation, classification, and distribution. Use of soil survey and computer databank information in balancing agronomic, economic, and environmental concerns in soil management. Credit for only one of Agron 154, 155, or 156 may be applied toward graduation.

Agron 155. Soils for Horticultural Scientists. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Chem 163. Restricted to students in Horticulture. Manu. Physical, chemical and biological properties of natural and manufactured soils. Use of soil information when producing plants on natural and manufactured soils. Credit for only one of Agron 154, 155, or 156 may be applied toward graduation.

Agron 156. Soils for Urban Use. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Restricted to students outside the College of Agriculture. Manu. Fundamental properties of soils and their application to urban settings. Development of a site plan for area of land using data from soil survey and computerized data bank information. Field trip. Credit for only one of Agron 154, 155 or 156 may be applied toward graduation.

Agron 206. Introduction to Meteorology. (Cross-listed with Mteor). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Basic concepts in meteorology, including atmospheric measurements, radiation, stability, precipitation, winds, fronts, forecasting, and severe weather. Applied topics include global warming, ozone depletion, world climates and weather safety. Self-study laboratory assignments utilize interactive computerized exercises, worksheets and computerized real-time forecasting. Self-study section may be available to distant education students.

Agron 208. Ethical Issues in Agriculture. (2-0) Cr. 1. F.S.SS. Half-semester. Discussion of ethical theory and its application to issues facing agriculture. Case studies deal with topics, such as biotechnology business practices, animal welfare, environmental impacts, public policy, sources of food, sustainable agriculture, and world hunger.

Agron 210. Professional Development in Agronomy: Career Planning. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Sophomore classification. Career planning, r sum and cover letter preparation, and interviewing techniques. Career orientation through invited speakers.

Agron 212. Crop Growth, Productivity and Management. (3-2) Cr. 4. F.S. Prereq: 114. Gibson. Production and management practices for corn, soybean, small grain, and forage crops common to Midwestern U.S. agriculture. Emphasis on growth and development, plant characteristics, management practices, crop use, quality, and problem-solving.

Agron 230. Crop Structure-Function Relationships. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Biol 212. Basic principles concerning the growth, development, and production of crop communities in relation to their environment.

Agron 260. Soils and Environmental Quality. (Cross-listed with Env S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Burras. Role of soils in environmental quality and natural resources management. Emphasis on soil erosion and conservation, water quality, and environmental planning. Saturday field trip.

Agron 283. Pesticide Application Certification. (Cross-listed with Ent, For, Hort). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Holscher. Core background and specialty topics in agricultural, and horticultural pesticide applicator certification. Students can select certification categories and have the opportunity to obtain pesticide applicator certification at the completion of the course. Commercial pesticide applicator certification is emphasized.

Agron 298. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of department cooperative education coordinator, sophomore classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Agron 306. Use of Weather Data in Agriculture. (Cross-listed with Mteor). (1-1) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: 206, 101 or 104 or 105. Arritt. Instrumentation, collection, and analyses of weather data relevant to crop production in the Midwest. Weather parameters are analyzed using computer applications. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 310. Professional Development in Agronomy: Work Experience. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Professional work experience in agronomy. See adviser for departmental requirements. Satisfactory-fail only.

Agron 317. Principles of Weed Science. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Biol 211 and 212. Hartzler. Identification, biology, and ecology of weeds. Principles and practices of integrated weed management systems. Herbicide mechanisms, classification, and fate in plants and soils.

Agron 320. Genetics, Agriculture and Biotechnology. (Cross-listed with Gen). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Biol 212. Transmission genetics with an emphasis on applications in agriculture, the structure and expression of the gene, how genes behave in populations and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to improve agriculture. Credit for graduation will not be allowed for more than one of the following: Gen 260, 313, 320 and Biol 313 and 313L.

Agron 330. Crop and Seed Identification Laboratory. (0-4) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: 114. Identification, agronomic and binomial classification of crops, weeds, and diseases. Analysis of crop seed samples for contaminants of weed and other crop seeds.

Agron 331. Intercollegiate Crops Team. (0-6) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Gibson. Intensive training in preparation for intercollegiate competition in national crops contests.

Agron 332. Crop Quality, Traits, and Utilization. (1-2) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: 212, Chem 163. Mullen. Characteristics, uses, and processing of agronomic crops. Factors affecting quality and utilization. Commercial grading and evaluation. One 1-day and one one-half day field trips are required.

Agron 334. Forage Crop Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 114. Barnhart, Wiedenhoeft. Production and management of forage crops; concepts applied to yield, quality, and stand persistence; systems of forage utilization including grazing, hay, and silage. Students enrolling for graduate credit will be expected to complete an additional class project. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 338. Seed Science and Technology. (Cross-listed with Hort). (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 114 or Hort 221, Biol 211. Knapp. Seed production, maturation, dormancy, vigor, deterioration, and related aspects of enhancement, conditioning, storage, and quality evaluation. Aspects of the seed industry and regulation of seed marketing.

Agron 342. World Food Issues: Past and Present. (Cross-listed with Env S, FS HN, T SC, U St). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Junior classification. World hunger and malnutrition in social, ethical, historical, and environmental context. Emphasis on the origins and effects of global inequity on population trends, socioeconomic policies, and food systems in the developing world. Exploration of directions and improvements for the future. Team projects. Nonmajor graduate credit.
H. Honors Section. (For students in the University Honors Program only.)

Agron 351. Turfgrass Establishment and Management. (Cross-listed with Hort). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Hort 221 or Agron 114 or Biol 211. Principles and practices of turfgrass propagation, establishment, and management. Specialized practices relative to professional lawn care, golf courses, athletic fields, highway roadsides, and seed and sod production. The biology and control of turfgrass pests. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 351L. Turfgrass Establishment and Management Laboratory. (Cross-listed with Hort). (0-3) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 351. Those enrolled in the horticulture curriculum are required to take 351L in conjunction with 351 except by permission of the instructor. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 354. Soils and Plant Growth. (Cross-listed with Hort). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 154 and Biol 101 or 212. Killorn or Loynachan. Effects of chemical, physical, and biological properties of soils on plant growth, with emphasis on nutritive elements, pH, organic matter maintenance, and rooting development. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 354L. Soils and Plant Growth Laboratory. (Cross-listed with Hort). (0-3) Cr. 1. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 354. Henning. Laboratory exercises in soil testing that assess a soil's ability to support nutritive requirements for plant growth.

Agron 356. Site-Specific Crop and Soil Management. (3-3) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: 354. Recommended: 114. Gibson, Polito. Development of solutions to crop and soil management problems in consultation with a producer-client. Identification of client needs, gathering technical information, and use of geographic information systems as a tool for making crop and soil management decisions. Development and presentation of solutions for crop and soil management issues confronting the client. Emphasis will be placed on identifying and solving complex problems that require integration of biological, physical, chemical, and economic components within a crop and soil management system. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 360. Environmental Soil Science. (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-3) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Agron 260 or Geol 100 or 201. Burras and Killorn. Application of soil science to contemporary environmental problems; comparison of the impacts that different management strategies have on short- and long-term environmental quality and land development. Emphasis on participatory learning activities.

Agron 370. Field Experience in Soil Description and Interpretation. (0-3) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: 154 and permission of instructor. Sandor. Description and interpretation of soils in the field and laboratory, emphasizing hands-on experience. Evaluation of soil information for land use. Students may participate in intercollegiate judging contests.

Agron 392. Systems Analysis in Crop and Soil Management. (2-3) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 230, 354. Wiedenhoeft. Management strategies at the level of the farm field. Emphasis will be on participatory learning activities.

Agron 398. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of department cooperative education coordinator; junior classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Agron 402. Watershed Hydrology and Surficial Processes. (Cross-listed with EnSci, NREM, Geol). (3-3) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in EnSci 381 or Geol 100 or 201, Math 165 or 181. Examination of watersheds as systems wherein biological and physical factors control hydrology, soil formation, and nutrient transport. Laboratory emphasizes field investigation of watershed-scale processes. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 402I. Watershed Hydrology and Surficial Processes. (Cross-listed with Ia LL, EnSci). Cr. 4. SS. Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering. Effects of geomorphology, soils, and land use on transport of water and materials (nutrients, contaminates) in watersheds. Fieldwork will emphasize investigations of the Iowa Great Lakes watershed. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 404. Global Change. (Dual-listed with 504). (Cross-listed with EnSci, Env S, Mteor). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering; junior standing. Recent changes in global biogeochemical cycles and climate; models of future changes in the climate system; impacts of global change on agriculture, water resources and human health; ethical issues of global environmental change. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 405. Environmental Biophysics. (Dual-listed with 505). (Cross-listed with Mteor). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: Math 166 or equivalent. Hornbuckle. The physical microenvironment in which organisms live, with an emphasis on the processes of energy and mass (water and carbon) exchange between organisms and their environment and the quantitative models that are used to represent these processes. Temperature, water, and wind. Heat, mass, and radiative transport. Applications to animals, plants, and plant communities. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 406. World Climates. (Cross-listed with Mteor, EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Agron/Mteor 206. Arritt. Distribution and causes of different climates around the world. Effects of climate and climate variations on human activities including society, economy and agriculture. Current issues such as climate change and international efforts to assess and mitigate the consequences of a changing climate. Semester project and in-class presentation required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 407. Mesoscale Meteorology. (Dual-listed with 507). (Cross-listed with Mteor). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Math 166 and Mteor 454. Arritt, Gallus. Physical nature and practical consequences of mesoscale atmospheric phenomena. Mesoscale convective systems, fronts, terrain-forced circulations. Observation, analysis, and prediction of mesoscale atmospheric structure.

Agron 410. Professional Development in Agronomy: Senior Forum. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S. Prereq: Senior classification. Development of an appropriate content for professionalism. Topics include professional certification, ethics, and maintaining an active network of information sources and professional contacts in support of lifelong learning. Student interpretation, writings, presentations, and discussions.

Agron 421. Introduction to Plant Breeding. (Cross-listed with Hort). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Gen 320 or Biol 313. Breeding methods used in the genetic improvement of self-pollinated, cross-pollinated and asexually reproducing agronomic crops. Applications of biotechnology techniques in the development of improved cultivars. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 446. International Agriculture and Sustainable Development. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 114, 154, 206. Mullen. Interdisciplinary study and comparison of systems around the world, including analysis of biophysical, social, economic, and political determinants of the systems. Analysis of system constraints and solution strategies. Evaluation of the productivity and sustainability of the systems. Team project and report.

Agron 450. Issues in Sustainable Agriculture. (Cross-listed with Env S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Zdorkowski. Agricultural science as a human activity; contemporary agricultural issues from agroecological perspective. Comparative analysis of intended and actual consequences of development of industrial agricultural practices.

Agron 452. GIS for Geoscientists. (Dual-listed with 552). (Cross-listed with Geol, EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Geol 100, Geol 201 or equivalent. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with particular emphasis on geoscientific data. Uses ESRI's ArcGIS Desktop Software and extension modules. Emphasizes typical GIS operations and analyses in the geosciences to prepare students for advanced GIS courses. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 459. Environmental Soil Chemistry. (Dual-listed with 559). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-3) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: Agron 354 or EnSci 360; Chem 164, 165, or 178; Math 140. Chem 211 recommended. Thompson. An introduction to the chemical properties of soils, chemical reactions and transformations occurring in the soils and their impact on the environment. Topics include composition of soils, acid-base equilibria, mineral dissolution and precipitation, speciation, ion exchange, redox reactions, adsorption phenomena, soil pollution and chemical-equilibria computer programs. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 473. Soil Genesis and Landscape Relationships. (Cross-listed with EnSci). (2-4) Cr. 4. S. Prereq: 154 or EnSci 402. Sandor. Relationships between soil formation, geomorphology, and environment. Soil description, classification, geography, mapping, and interpretation for land use. Two weekend field trips. Credit for only Agron 473 or 473I may be applied for graduation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 473I. Soil Genesis and Landscape Relationships. (Cross-listed with EnSci, Ia LL). Cr. 4. Alt. SS., offered 2008. Prereq: Agron 154 or 402 or 402I. Relationships between soil formation, geomorphology, and environment. Soil description, classification, geography, mapping, and interpretation for land use. Credit for only Agron 473 or 473I may be applied for graduation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 485. Soil Microbial Ecology. (Dual-listed with 585). (Cross-listed with EnSci, Micro). (2-3) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 154 or 402, Micro 201 (Micro 203 recommended). Loynachan. The living organisms in the soil and what they do. Emphasis on soil biota composition, the carbon cycle and bioremediation, soil-plant-microbial relationships, and environmental issues. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 490. Independent Study. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Junior or senior classification with at least 8 credits in agronomy; permission of instructor in specialty area after consultation. Selected studies in crops, soils, or agricultural meteorology according to the needs and interests of the student.
H. Honors

Agron 491. Seed Science Internship Experience. (Cross-listed with TSM, Hort). Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Agron 338, advanced approval and participation of employer and instructor. A professional work experience and creative project for seed science secondary majors. The project requires the prior approval and participation of the employer and instructor. The student must submit a written report.

Agron 493. Workshop in Agronomy. Cr. arr. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Staff. Workshop experience in crops, soils, or agricultural meteorology. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 495. Agricultural Travel Course Preparation. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Limited enrollment. Students enrolled in this course intend to register for Agron 496 the following term. Topics will include the agricultural industries, climate, crops, culture, economics, geography, history, livestock, marketing, soils, and preparation for travel to locations to be visited.

Agron 496. Agricultural Travel Course. Cr. arr. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Limited enrollment. Tour and study of production methods in major crop and livestock regions of the world. Influence of climate, economics, geography, soils, landscapes, markets, and other factors on crop and livestock production. Location and duration of tours will vary. Tour expenses paid by students. Check with department for current offerings.
A. International Tour
B. Domestic Tour

Agron 497. Agroecology Field Course. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Jr. or Sr. classification with at least 8 credits in Agronomy. A one-week intensive class, offered off-campus. Student will visit farms within the Midwest and analyze the sustainability of each farm.

Agron 498. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of department cooperative education coordinator; senior classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

Agron 500. Orientation Seminar. (2-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: International agronomy graduate students only. Loynachan. An introduction to Iowa and U.S. agriculture for international scholars in agronomic majors. Field trips when possible. Departmental role in the functioning of research, teaching, and extension in fulfilling the charge given the land-grant university.

Agron 501. Crop Growth and Development. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 114, Math 140, Chem 163, Biol 101. Physiological processes in crop growth, development and yield: photosynthesis, respiration, water relations, mineral nutrition, assimilate partitioning, seedling vigor, light interception and canopy growth, root growth, reproduction and yield. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program. Restricted to graduate students enrolled in degree programs at Iowa State University.

Agron 502. Chemistry, Physics, and Biology of Soils. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 114, 154, Biol 101, Chem 163, and Math 140. Soil chemical, physical, and biological properties that control processes within the soil, their influence on plant/soil interactions, and soil classification. Basic concepts in soil science and their applications. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program. Restricted to graduate students enrolled in degree programs at Iowa State University.

Agron 503. Climate and Crop Growth. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 114 and Math 140. Taylor. Applied concepts in climate and agricultural meteorology with emphasis on the climate-agriculture relationship and the microclimate-agriculture interaction. Basic meteorological principles are also presented to support these applied concepts. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program. Restricted to graduate students enrolled in degree programs at Iowa State University.

Agron 504. Global Change. (Dual-listed with 404). (Cross-listed with Mteor, EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering; junior, senior, or graduate standing. Recent changes in global biogeochemical cycles and climate; models of future changes in the climate system; impacts of global change on agriculture, water resources and human health; ethical issues of global environmental change.

Agron 505. Environmental Biophysics. (Dual-listed with 405). (Cross-listed with Mteor, EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: Math 166 or equivalent. Hornbuckle. The physical microenvironment in which organisms live, with an emphasis on the processes of energy and mass (water and carbon) exchange between organisms and their environment and the quantitative models that are used to represent these processes. Temperature, water, and wind. Heat, mass, and radiative transport. Applications to animals, plants, and plant communities. Semester project required.

Agron 507. Mesoscale Meteorology. (Dual-listed with 407). (Cross-listed with Mteor). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Math 166 and Mteor 454. Arritt, Gallus. The physical nature and practical consequences of mesoscale atmospheric phenomena. Mesoscale convective systems, fronts, terrain-forced circulations. Observation, analysis, and prediction of mesoscale atmospheric structure. Semester project and in-class presentation required.

Agron 508. Biophysical Crop Ecology. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 505. Taylor. Principles of resource capture (light and water) applied to growth and development. Ecological implications of radiation, temperature, moisture, and the biological properties of size, shape, resistance to water vapor loss, and absorptivity to solar and thermal radiation. Physiological stress in the soil, plant, atmosphere continuum.

Agron 509. Agroecosystem Analysis. (Cross-listed with Anthr, Soc, SusAg). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Senior or above classification. Experiential, interdisciplinary examination of Midwestern agricultural and food systems, emphasizing field visits, with some classroom activities. Focus on understanding multiple elements, perspectives (agronomic, economic, ecological, social, etc), and scales of operation.

Agron 510. Crop Improvement. (Cross-listed with STB). Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Admission to the Seed Technology and Business Master's Degree Program or approval of the instructor. A study of the basic principles and methods in the genetic improvement of crop plants. Methods used in manipulating genomes through the use of biotechnology. Methods of cultivar development. Quantitive procedures for describing response to selection. Analysis of the relationship of reproductive characters and growth characteristics to response to selection. Restricted to students admitted to the distance eduction Master of Seed Technology and Business degree program or by special arrangement with the instructor.

Agron 511. Crop Improvement. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 114, Math 140, Chem 163, Biol 101. Campbell. Basic principles in the genetic improvement of crop plants. Methods of cultivar development in self-pollinated and cross-pollinated crop species. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program. Restricted to graduate students enrolled in degree programs at Iowa State University.

Agron 512. Soil-Plant Environment. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 502. Recommended 501. Loynachan. Soil properties and their impact on soil/plant relationships. Soil structure, aeration, moisture, and nutrients will be discussed in the context of soil fertility and environmental quality management. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program. Restricted to graduate students enrolled in degree programs at Iowa State University.

Agron 513. Quantitative Methods for Agronomy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Math 140, Stat 104. Quantitative methods for analyzing and interpreting agronomic information. Principles of experimental design, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regression, correlation, and graphical representation of data. Use of JMP for organization, analyzing, and presenting data. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program. Restricted to graduate students enrolled in degree programs at Iowa State University.

Agron 514. Integrated Pest Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Prereq: 114, 501, Math 140, Chem 163, Biol 101. Recommended: 502, 503. Principles and practices of weed science, entomology, and plant pathology applied to crop production systems. Biology, ecology, and introductory principles of crop pest management. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program. Restricted to graduate students enrolled in degree programs at Iowa State University.

Agron 515. Integrated Crop and Livestock Production Systems. (Cross-listed with A E, SusAg, An S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 509. Methods to maintain productivity and minimize the negative ecological effects of agricultural systems by understanding nutrient cycles, managing manure and crop residue, and utilizing multispecies interactions. Crop and livestock production within landscapes and watersheds is also considered. Course includes a significant field component, with student teams analyzing Iowa farms.

Agron 516. Crop Physiology. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Biol 330. Westgate. Molecular, whole plant, and canopy processes essential to biomass production and seed formation and the limitations imposed on these processes by the environment. Students gain practical experience evaluating crop physiology research and communicating that evaluation to scientific peers.

Agron 517. Weed Biology and Ecology. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 317, Biol 474. Dekker. Invasive plant species and weed evolution and biodiversity for exploitation of distributed and managed habitats. Selection and adaptation of weeds in agro-ecosystems: soil weed seed banks, population shifts, and crop-weed interactions. Life history and trait basis for colonizing plant species.

Agron 518. Microwave Remote Sensing. (Cross-listed with E E, Mteor). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: Math 265 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Hornbuckle. Microwave remote sensing, both passive (radiometry) and active (radar), as it applies to Earth's surface and atmosphere. Overview of relevant electromagnetic theory and antenna theory. Planck emission and the radiative transfer equation. The electrical properties of natural media (atmosphere, soil, and vegetation) at microwave frequencies. Atmospheric sounding, remote sensing of soil and vegetation water content, data inversion, and data assimilation.

Agron 519. Herbicide Physiology and Biochemistry. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 317; Biol 330. Owen. Herbicide mechanisms of action, selectivity, uptake, and translocation. Specific sites of herbicide action as they affect plant physiology. Herbicide resistance in weeds and crops. Implications of herbicides on weed management.

Agron 521. Principles of Cultivar Development. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 421; Stat 401. Theoretical and practical analysis of alternative breeding methods to improve crop plants. Strategies to incorporate germplasm resources, develop populations, maximize genetic gain, and use marker-assisted selection. Relationship of breeding methods to commercial seed production.

Agron 522. Field Methods in Plant Breeding. (0-6) Cr. 2. SS. Prereq: 521. Field experience in planning and conducting plant breeding research for cross-pollinated and self-pollinated crops.

Agron 526. Field Plot Technique. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Stat 401. Moore. Planning experiments for agricultural research, analysis of data, and concepts in data interpretation.

Agron 527. Plant Genetics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Gen 410. Bhattacharyya. Fundamental genetic and cytogenetic concepts from plant perspective including recombination, linkage analysis, genetic and molecular mapping, male sterility, self incompatibility, apomixis, and polyploid evolution.

Agron 529. Publishing in Plant Science Journals. (Cross-listed with Hort, NREM). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: Permission of instructor; evidence of a publishable unit of the student's research data. Process of preparing a manuscript for submission to a refereed journal in the biological sciences. Emphasis on publishing self-generated data from thesis or dissertation research.

Agron 530. Ecologically Based Pest Management Strategies. (Cross-listed with SusAg, Ent, Pl P). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: SusAg 509. Durable, least-toxic strategies for managing weeds, pathogens, and insect pests, with emphasis on underlying ecological processes.

Agron 531. Crop Ecology and Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 501, 502, 503. Recommended: 512, 514. Environmental factors affecting crop growth and yield. Ecological principles underlying crop production systems. Crop production in the context of management approaches, system resources and constraints, and interactions. Emphasis on the ecology row and forage crops common in the Midwest. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program. Restricted to graduate students enrolled in degree programs at Iowa State University.

Agron 532. Soil Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 501, 503, 512. Recommended 513. Cruse. Evaluates the impact of various soil management practices on soil and water resources. Combines and applies basic information gained in Agron 502 and Agron 512. Emphasizes the agronomic, economic, and environmental effects of soil management strategies. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program. Restricted to graduate students enrolled in degree programs at Iowa State University.

Agron 533. Crop Protection. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 514. Integrated management systems for important crop pests. Cultural, biological and chemical management strategies applicable to major crops grown in the Midwest. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program. Restricted to graduate students enrolled in degree programs at Iowa State University.

Agron 534. Seed and Variety, Testing and Technology. (Cross-listed with STB). Cr. 2. Prereq: Admission to the Seed Technology and Business Master's Degree Program or approval of the instructor. The components of seed quality and how they are assessed in the laboratory, including traits derived from modern biotechnology. The impact of new technologies on seed quality testing. Variety maintenance procedures and breeder seed. Variety identification: phenotype and grow-out trials, isozyme testing, and DNA marker testing. Procedures for evaluating varieties. The variance tests appropriate for fixed effects analysis of variance. Statistical inference and stratification for yield trials. Use of strip plot testing. Restricted to students admitted to the distance eduction Master's of Seed Technology and Business degree program or by special arrangement with the instructor.

Agron 535. Introduction to the Seed Industry. (Cross-listed with STB). Cr. 1. Prereq: Curriculum requires undergraduate specialization in a business or biological science. An analysis of the defining characteristics of the seed industry and introduction to the Master in Seed Technology and Business curriculum. The tasks of crop improvement and seed production will be analytically related to basic management functions and classifications of management activities that are used in the study of business administration. Management tasks and roles will be analyzed in related to the public policy issues that shape the seed industry, including ethical and economical approaches to biotechnology, intellectual property, and corporate responsibility. Restricted to students admitted to the distance eduction Master's in Seed Technology and Business degree program, or by special arrangement with the instructor.

Agron 536. Quantitative Methods for Seed. (Cross-listed with STB). Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Admission to the Seed Technology and Business Master's Degree Program or approval of the instructor. Quantitative Methods for analyzing and interpreting agronomic and business information for the seed industry. Principles of experimental design and hypothesis testing, regression, correlation and graphical representation of data. Use of spreadsheets for manipulating, analyzing and presenting data. Restricted to students admitted to the Master's of Seed Technology and Business degree program or by special arrangement with the instructor.

Agron 537. Plant Stress Biology. (Cross-listed with Hort, EEOB). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: Biol 330A or euqivalent and BBMB 404-405. Physiology and molecular biology of plant responses to environmental stress. Emphasis on the role of hormones and hormone interactions in governing stress reponses. Lectures are prepared from journal papers that elucidate key mechanisms controlling reponses to drought, flooding, salt, nutrient deficiencies, freezing, pathogens and herbivores. Plants studied include genetic model systems and crops of horticultural and agronomic value.

Agron 538. Seed Physiology. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 338; Chem 231 or Chem 331. Goggi. Physiological aspects of seed development, maturation, longevity, dormancy, and germination. Emphasis on current literature and advanced methodology.

Agron 539. Seed Conditioning and Storage. (Cross-listed with STB). Cr. 2. F. Prereq: Admission to the Seed Technology and Business Master's Degree Program or approval of the instructor. The technical operations which may be carried out on a seed lot from harvest until it is ready for marketing and use. The opportunities for quality improvement and the risks of deterioration which are present during that time. Analysis of the costs of and benefits of operations. Evaluation of equipment based on benefits to the customer and producer. Interpretation of the role of the conditioning plant and store as focal points within the overall operations of a seed company. Restricted to students admitted to the distance education Master's of Seed Technology and Business degree program, or by special arrangement with the instructor.

Agron 541. Applied Agricultural Meteorology. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S.SS. Prereq: 206 or upper division Biological Science. Taylor. Applied concepts in agricultural meteorology. Basic concepts of weather and of crop/climate relationships influencing production, protection, yield and associated production risk factors. Self study sections are available to resident and to distant education students all semesters. Credit for only one of Agron 503 or 541 may be applied toward graduation.

Agron 546. Organizational Strategies for Diversified Farming Systems. (Cross-listed with Soc, Hort, SusAg). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: SUSAG 509. Examination of the organization and operation of complex, diversified farming systems using tools and perspectives drawn from ecology, agronomy, and sociology. The course includes a significant field component focused on an Iowa farm.

Agron 547. Seed Production. (Cross-listed with STB). Cr. 2. Prereq: Admission to the Seed Technology and Business Master's Degree Program or approval of instructor. Survey of crop production; including management of soil fertility, planting dates, populations, weed control, and insect control. Analysis of the principles of seed multiplication and the key practices which are used to ensure high quality in the products. Field inspection procedures and production aspects that differ from other crop production. Foundation seed production. Analysis of the typical organization of field production tasks. Resources and capabilities required. Survey of differences in seed production strategies between crops and impact of differences on management of seed production. Restricted to students admitted to the distance eduction Master of Seed Technology and Business degree program, or by special arrangement with the instructor.

Agron 551. Growth and Development of Perennial Grasses. (Cross-listed with Hort). (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: Junior or senior or graduate classification or permission of instructor. The grass plant. Selected topics on anatomy, morphology, and physiology relative to growth and development of perennial grasses. Emphasis on growth and development characteristics peculiar to grasses and variations of such characteristics under natural and managed conditions.

Agron 552. GIS for Geoscientists. (Dual-listed with 452). (Cross-listed with Geol, EnSci). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Geol 100, Geol 201 or equivalent. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with particular emphasis on geoscience data. Uses ESRI's ArcGIS Desktop Software and extension modules. Emphasizes typical GIS operations and analyses in the geosciences to prepare students for advanced GIS courses.

Agron 553. Soil-Plant Relationships. (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Agron 354. Killorn. Composition and properties of soils in relation to the nutrition and growth of plants.

Agron 554. Advanced Soil Management. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: 354; Math 165. Cruse. Implications of soil management on the soil environment and root activity. Effect of soil physical properties on soil erosion.

Agron 555. Soil Clay Mineralogy. (Cross-listed with Geol). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: Agron 473, Chem 178. Recommend: Geol 311. Structure and behavior of clay minerals in soil environments, with emphasis on layer silicates and on Fe, Mn, and Al oxides.

Agron 555L. Soil Clay Mineralogy Laboratory. (Cross-listed with Geol). (0-3) Cr. 1. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 555. Thompson. Application of X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and chemical analyses to identification and behavior of clay minerals in soils.

Agron 559. Environmental Soil Chemistry. (Dual-listed with 459). (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-3) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: Agron 354 or EnSci 360; Chem 164, 165, or 178; Math 140. Chem 211 recommended. Thompson. An introduction to the chemical properties of soils, chemical reactions and transformations occurring in the soils and their impact on the environment. Topics include composition of soils, acid-base equilibria, mineral dissolution and precipitation, speciation, ion exchange, redox reactions, adsorption phenomena, soil pollution and chemical-equilibria computer programs.

Agron 561. Population and Quantitative Genetics for Breeding. (Cross-listed with An S). (4-0) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: Stat 401. Population and quantitative genetics for plant and animal genetics. Study of the genetic basis and analysis of variation in quantitative traits in domestic or experimental populations using phenotypic and molecular marker data, including estimation of heritability and other genetic parameters, linkage analysis and mapping of quantitative trait loci, and the impact of inbreeding, heterosis, and genotype-by-environment interaction.

Agron 565. Professional Practice in the Life Sciences. (Cross-listed with Pl P, An S, BCB, Hort, Micro, V MPM). Cr. 0.5. S. Prereq: Graduate classification. Professional discourse on the ethical and legal issues facing life science researchers. Offered in modular format; each module is four weeks.
A. Professional Practices in Research. Good scientific practices and professional ethics in the life sciences.
B. Intellectual Property and Industry Interactions. Ethical and legal issues facing life scientists involved in research interactions with industry.
C. Life Science Ethics. Basic principles of moral theory, and ethical issues about the environment, biotechnology, and the appropriate role of scientific experts in public moral debate.
D. Ethics in Plant Breeding and Plant Genetic Resource Conservation. Ethical issues facing scientists involved in crop improvement, plant conservation, and plant biotechnology.

Agron 570. Risk Assessment for Food, Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine. (Cross-listed with VDPAM, Tox). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: Stat 104 or consent of instructor: Wolt, Hurd. Risk assessment principles as applied to biological systems. Exposure and effects characterization in human and animal health and ecological risk assessment. Risk analysis frameworks and regulatory decision-making. Introduction to quantitative methods for risk assessment using epidemiological and distributional analyses. Uncertainty analysis.

Agron 575. Soil Morphology, Genesis, and Classification. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 459, 473; Geol 100. Synthesis of how landscapes, water, organisms, and chemical reactions determine the morphology, mineralogy and spatial distribution of soils.

Agron 577. Soil Physics. (Cross-listed with EnSci). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 354. Recommended: Math 166. Horton. The physical soil system: the soil components and their physical interactions; transport processes involving water, air, and heat.

Agron 578. Laboratory Methods in Soil Physics. (Cross-listed with EnSci). (0-3) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: 577 concurrent. Horton. Methods of measuring soil physical properties such as texture, density, and water content, and transport of heat, water, and gases.

Agron 585. Soil Microbial Ecology. (Dual-listed with 485). (Cross-listed with EnSci, Micro). (2-3) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 154 or 402, Micro 201 (Micro 203 recommended). Loynachan. The living organisms in the soil and what they do. Emphasis on soil biota composition, the carbon cycle and bioremediation, soil-plant-microbial relationships, and environmental issues. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Agron 590. Special Topics. Cr. arr. Repeatable. Prereq: 15 credits in agronomy. Literature reviews and conferences on selected topics in crops, soils, or agricultural meteorology according to needs and interest of student.

Agron 591. Agronomic Systems Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 511, 513, 531, 532, 533. Wiedenhoeft. Analysis of cropping systems from a problem-solving perspective. Case studies will be used to develop the students' ability to solve agronomic problems. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program. Restricted to graduate students enrolled in degree programs at Iowa State University.

Agron 592. Current Issues in Agronomy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 501, 503, 511, 512, 513, 514. Knapp. Study and discussion of topics of current interest to the field of agronomy. While Agron 591 deals with agronomics at the farm and landscape level, Agron 592 seeks to address issues on a broader scale including off-farm agricultural impacts. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program. Restricted to graduate students enrolled in degree programs at Iowa State University.

Agron 594. Workshop in Agronomy. (0-1) Cr. 1. SS. Prereq: 501, 502, 503, 514 (or current enrollment). Recommended: 511, 512, 513. Westgate. Practical field and laboratory experience integrating coursework in climatology, crops, and soils. Workshop includes lectures, labs and local agri-business tours. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program. Restricted to graduate students enrolled in degree programs at Iowa State University.

Agron 595. Seed Quality, Production, and Research Management. (Cross-listed with STB). Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: Admission to the Seed Technology and Business Master's Degree Program or approval of the instructor. Advanced survey of the organization, staff capabilities and management characteristics typical in seed production and crop improvement in seed enterprises. Analysis of the use of quality information in the management of seed operations and sales. Process management applications for seed. Production planning for existing capacity. Analysis of the manager's tasks in the annual cycle and how the tasks of these managers relate to the general categories of business management roles. Difference in management strategies used with different situations and groups of employees. Restricted to students admitted to the distance eduction Master's of Seed Technology and Business degree program, or by special arrangement with the instructor.

Agron 599. Creative Component. Cr. arr. Prereq: Nonthesis M.S. option only. A written report based on research, library readings, or topics related to the student's area of specialization and approved by the student's advisory committee.
A. Agricultural Meteorology
B. Crop Production and Physiology
C. Plant Breeding
D. Soil Chemistry
E. Soil Fertility
F. Soil Management
G. Soil Microbiology and Biochemistry
H. Soil Morphology and Genesis
I. Soil Physics
K. Seed Science
L. Weed Science
M. Agronomy

Courses for graduate students

Agron 600. Seminar. (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S. Reports and discussion of recent literature and research.
A. Plant Breeding.
B. Soils. F.S.
C. Crop Production and Physiology. F.S.

Agron 609. Agricultural Meteorology Conference. (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Literature reviews and conferences with instructor on special problems relating to agricultural meteorology, beyond the scope of current courses offered.

Agron 610. Foundations of Sustainable Agriculture. (Cross-listed with SusAg, A E, Anthr, Soc). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate classification, permission of instructor. Historical, biophysical, socioeconomic, and ethical dimensions of agricultural sustainability. Strategies for evaluating existing and emerging agricultural systems in terms of the core concepts of sustainability and their theoretical contexts.

Agron 616. Advanced Topics in Crop Physiology and Biochemistry. (4-0) Cr. 4. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 516; BBMB 404; permission of instructor. Westgate. An in-depth treatment of physiological, biochemical and molecular processes regulating plant growth and development. Emphasis on individual study followed by in-class presentations and discussion.

Agron 621. Advanced Plant Breeding. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 521, 526, 561; Gen 410. Lamkey. Estimation and interpretation of genetic effects and variances of plant populations, analysis of mating designs, heritability estimation, intra- and interpopulation selection methods, prediction of genetic gain, inbreeding and heterosis, classification and development of parental materials, selection indices, and combining ability analysis.

Agron 625. Genetic Strategies in Plant Breeding. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 521, Gen 410. Lee. Evaluation of genetic, molecular, and cellular approaches to crop improvement; gene transfer methods. Application and role of basic plant biology in breeding programs and processes; genome structure and function, gene isolation, expression, regulation, and modification. Integration of molecular and cellular methods in breeding strategies; analysis of alternative breeding methods, regulatory and ethical issues.

Agron 655. Advanced Soil Fertility. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 553. Evaluation of soil fertility and fertilizers; theory and applications.

Agron 675. Advanced Soil Genesis and Classification. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2009. Prereq: 575. Fenton. Processes, reactions, and theories in soil formation; landscape evolution; principles of soil classification.

Agron 677. Advanced Soil Physics. (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 577; Math 266, 267. Recommended: Com S 207. Horton. The flow and distribution of water, chemicals, and heat in soils. Physical principles and applications.

Agron 685. Advanced Soil Biochemistry. (Cross-listed with Micro, EnSci). (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: Agron 585. Tabatabai. Chemistry of soil organic matter and biochemical transformations brought about by microorganisms and enzymes in soils.

Agron 696P. Seminar in Plant Physiology and Molecular Biology. (Cross-listed with BBMB, GDCB, P Phy, Hort, For). Cr. 1. Repeatable. Research seminars by faculty and graduate students. Satisfactory-fail only.[TOPICS!!! Parsing instruction element was not found] P. Plant Physiology and Molecular Biology.

Agron 698. Agronomy Teaching Practicum. Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Graduate classification in agronomy and permission of instructor. Graduate student experience in the agronomy teaching program. Satisfactory-fail only.

Agron 699. Research. Cr. arr. Repeatable.
A. Agricultural Meteorology
B. Crop Production and Physiology
C. Plant Breeding
D. Soil Chemistry
E. Soil Fertility
F. Soil Management
G. Soil Microbiology and Biochemistry
H. Soil Morphology and Genesis
I. Soil Physics
J. Plant Physiology
K. Seed Science
L. Weed Science