Iowa State University

Iowa State University

2007-2009 Courses and Programs

Iowa State University Catalog

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Aerospace Engineering (Aer E)

200 |300 |400 |Graduate Courses |

(Administered by the Department of Aerospace Engineering )
Thomas Shih, Chair of Department
Distinguished Professors: Soukoulis, R. B. Thompson
Distinguished Professors (Emeritus): D. Thompson, Young
Professors: Chandra, Chimenti, Durbin, Holger, Inger, Kelkar, Lu, McDaniel, Oliver, Rajagopalan, Rothmayer, Rudolphi, Sarkar, Schmerr, Shih, Takle, Zachary
Professors (Emeritus): Akers, Greer, Iversen, Jenison, McConnell, Munson, Pierson, Rizzo, Rogge, Rohach, Tannehill, Tsai, Weiss, Wilson
Professors (Adjunct): Hsu
Associate Professors: Bastawros, Dayal, Hilliard, Hindman, Mitra, Sherman, Sturges, Wang
Associate Professors (Emeritus): Hermann, Seversike, Trulin, Vogel
Associate Professors (Adjunct): Biner, Cox, Inanc, Roberts
Associate Professors (Collaborators): Flatau
Assistant Professors: Haan, Holland, Hu, Jacobson
Assistant Professors (Adjunct): Byrd, Gray, Legg
Assistant Professors (Collaborators): Chavez
Lecturers: Haugli, Schaefer

Undergraduate Study

For undergraduate curriculum in aerospace engineering leading to the degree bachelor of science, see College of Engineering, Curricula. This curriculum is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

The aerospace engineer is primarily concerned with the design, analysis, testing, and overall operation of vehicles which operate in air, water, and space. The curriculum is designed to provide the student with an education in the fundamental principles of aerodynamics, fl ight dynamics, propulsion, structural mechanics, fl ight controls, design, testing, and space technologies. A wide variety of opportunities awaits the aerospace engineering graduate in research, development, design, production, sales, and management in the aerospace industry, and in many related industries in which fl uid fl ow, control, and transportation problems play major roles.

A cooperative education program in aerospace engineering is available in cooperation with government agencies and industry. The usual four-year curriculum is extended over a five-year span to permit alternating industrial experience periods and academic periods. This arrangement offers valuable practical experience and financial assistance during the college years. See College of Engineering, Cooperative Programs.

Undergraduate Mission and Educational Objectives

The Department of Aerospace Engineering maintains an internationally recognized academic program in aerospace engineering via ongoing consultation with students, faculty, industry, and aerospace professionals. Results of these consultations are used in a process of continuous academic improvement to provide the best possible education for our students.

Mission Statement:? The mission of the Aerospace Engineering Program is to prepare the aerospace engineering student for a career with wide-ranging opportunities in research, development, design, production, sales, and management in the aerospace industry and in the many related industries which are involved with the solution of multi-disciplinary, advanced technology problems.

Program Educational Objectives:

1. Coordinate the Aerospace Engineering Program's mission, educational objectives, and learning outcomes with the Iowa State University, College of Engineering, and the Aerospace Engineering Department mission, objectives, and outcomes.

2. Educate students in the application of fundamental principles of aerodynamics, fl ight dynamics, propulsion, structural mechanics, fl ight controls, design, testing, and space technologies to the solution of significant aerospace problems.

3. Educate students in the use and application of numerical techniques and computational tools in the solution of significant aerospace problems.

4. Prepare students to be successful in the workplace utilizing non-technical skills that include: communication skills, teamwork, leadership, ethical and societal responsibility considerations.

5. Provide students with applied engineering experiences through hands-on laboratory courses, internships, and cooperative education experience opportunities.

6. Maintain an ongoing consultation with students, faculty, industry, and aerospace professionals for the continuous process of academic improvement.

Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE)

The NDE minor is multidisciplinary and open to undergraduates in the College of Engineering. The minor may be earned by completing 16 credits

including:

(1) MatE/E M 362 and 362L

(2) Two courses (6-7 credits) from: E M 350, Aer E/E E/E M/Mat E 490 (in the area of NDE), M S E/E M 550.

(3) Two courses (6 credits) from: Aer E 321, 421, 422, 423, 426; E E 424; E M 424, 425; Mat E 418, 443, 444; M E 417, 418; Stat 305.

A combined average grade of C or higher is required in courses applied to the minor and the minor must include at least 9 credits that are not used to meet any other department, college, or university requirement.

Graduate Study

The department offers work for the degrees master of engineering, master of science, and doctor of philosophy with major in aerospace engineering, and minor work to students taking major work in other departments. For all graduate degrees it is possible to establish a co-major program with another graduate degree granting department.

Within the aerospace program, work is available in the following areas: aerospace systems design, atmospheric and space flight dynamics, computational fluid dynamics, control systems, wind engineering, fluid mechanics, optimization, structural analysis, and non-destructive evaluation.

The degrees master of science and doctor of philosophy require an acceptable thesis in addition to the coursework. For the degree master of engineering, a creative component or suitable project is required. Appropriate credit is allotted for this requirement.

Minor work for aerospace engineering majors is usually selected from mathematics, physics, electrical engineering, engineering mechanics, mechanical engineering, materials science, meteorology, computer science, and computer engineering.

The normal prerequisite to major graduate work in aerospace engineering is the completion of a curriculum substantially equivalent to that required of aerospace engineering students at this university. However, because of the diversity of interests within the graduate programs in aerospace engineering, a student whose prior undergraduate or graduate education has been in allied engineering and/or scientific fields may also qualify. In such cases, it may be necessary for the student to take additional work to provide the requisite background. A prospective graduate student is urged to specify the degree program and the specific field(s) of interest on the application for admission.

Courses normally will be offered at the times stated in the course description. Where no specific time of offering is stated, the course may be offered during any semester provided there is sufficient demand.

Courses open for nonmajor graduate credit: 311, 321, 331, 343, 351, 355, 361, 411, 412, 417, 421, 422, 423, 426, 432, 441, 442, 446, 448, 451, 461, 464.

Courses primarily for undergraduate students

Aer E 101H. Engineering Honors Orientation. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Membership in the Freshman Honors Program. Introduction to the College of Engineering and the Aerospace Engineering profession. Information concerning university, college, and department policies, procedures and resources with emphasis on the Freshman Honors Program. Topics include experiential education study abroad opportunities, and department mentorships.

Aer E 112. Orientation to Learning and Productive Team Membership. (Cross-listed with FS HN, Hort, TSM, NREM). (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Introduction to developing intentional learners and worthy team members. Learning as the foundation of human enterprise; intellectual curiosity; ethics as a personal responsibility; everyday leadership; effective team and community interactions including team learning and the effects on individuals; and growth through understanding self, demonstrating ownership of own learning, and internalizing commitment to helping others. Intentional mental processing as a means of enhancing learning. Interconnectedness of the individual, the community, and the world.

Aer E 160. Aerospace Engineering Problems With Computer Applications Laboratory. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Satisfactory scores on mathematics placement examination; credit or enrollment in Math 142, 165. Solving aerospace engineering problems and presenting solutions through technical reports. Significant figures. SI units. Graphing and curve fitting. Flowcharting. Introduction to material balances, mechanics, electrical circuits, statistics engineering economics, and design. Spreadsheet programs. Introduction to UNIX/LINUX computing environments, and programming in FORTRAN. Team projects.
H. Honors. F.

Aer E 161. Numerical, Graphical and Laboratory Techniques for Aerospace Engineering. (3-2) Cr. 4. F.S. Prereq: 160 or equivalent course. Computer solutions to aerospace engineering problems using the FORTRAN language and Matlab(R), with emphasis on numerical methods. Introduction to computing environments including UNIX/LINUX. Graphical description of geometrical objects with emphasis on aerospace design. Solid modeling using computer graphics software. Develop proficiency with basic instrumentation utilized in subsequent Aerospace Engineering laboratory courses. Computational and statistical analysis of lab results. Written and oral technical reports, team projects.
H. Honors. spring only.

Aer E 192. Aerospace Seminar. Cr. R. S. (1-0) Professional skills development activities. Designed to encourage involvement in a variety of aerospace engineering activities and related professional activities, specifically experiential learning and study abroad. Academic program planning, departmental symposium participation.
H. Honors.

Aer E 243. Aerodynamics I. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Grade of C- or better in 261, Math 265, enrollment in 243L. Introduction to fluid mechanics and aerodynamics. Fluid properties, statics, and kinematics. Conservation equations in differential and integral form. Bernoulli's equation. Dimensional analysis. Basic potential flow concepts and solutions. Examples of numerical methods. Applications of multi-variable calculus to fluid mechanics and aerodynamics.

Aer E 243L. Aerodynamics Laboratory I. (0-3) Cr. 0.5. F.S. Prereq: Enrollment in 243. Introduction to fluid dynamic principles and instruments in aerodynamics through laboratory studies and experiments. Report writing.

Aer E 261. Introduction to Aerospace Engineering. (4-0) Cr. 4. F.S. Prereq: 161, Math 166, Phys 221. Introduction to aerospace disciplinary topics, including: aerodynamics, structures, propulsion, and flight dynamics with emphasis on performance.

Aer E 265. Scientific Balloon Engineering and Operations. (Cross-listed with Mteor). (0-2) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F. Engineering aspects of scientific balloon flights. Integration of science mission objectives with engineering requirements. Operations team certification. FAA and FCC regulations, communications, and command systems. Flight path prediction and control.

Aer E 290. Independent Study. Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. Prereq: Sophomore classification, approval of the department.
A. Flight ground instruction
B. In-flight training (Prereq: 301.)
C. Other

Aer E 291. Aerospace Seminar. Cr. R. F. (1-0) Professional skills development activities. Designed to encourage involvement in a variety of aerospace engineering activities and related professional activities. Academic program planning, departmental symposium participation.
H. Honors

Aer E 292. Aerospace Seminar. Cr. R. S. (1-0) Professional skills development activities. Designed to encourage involvement in a variety of aerospace engineering activities and related professional activities. Academic program planning, departmental symposium participation. Satisfactory-fail only.
H. Honors

Aer E 298. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of department and Engineering Career Services. First professional work period in the cooperative education program. Students must register for this course prior to commencing work. Satisfactory-fail only.

Aer E 301. Flight Experience. Cr. R. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 355. Two hours of in-flight training and necessary ground instruction. Course content prescribed by the Aerospace Engineering Department. Six hours of flight training certified in a pilot log book can be considered by the course instructor as evidence of satisfactory performance in the course. Satisfactory-fail only.

Aer E 311. Gas Dynamics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 243, M E 330, enrollment in 311L. Properties of liquids and gases, review of thermodynamic processes and relations, energy equation, compressible flow, shock and expansion waves, isentropic flow, Fanno and Rayleigh flow. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 311L. Gas Dynamics Laboratory. (0-3) Cr. 0.5. S. Prereq: 243, 243L, enrollment in 311. Introduction to experimental compressible flow and propulsion principles, techniques and instruments through laboratory studies and experiments. Report writing.

Aer E 321. Flight Structures Analysis and Laboratory. (2-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: E M 324. 3 hours of lecture weekly and laboratory alternating weeks. Determination of flight loads. Materials selection for flight applications. Analysis of flight structures including trusses, beams, frames, and shear panels employing classical and finite element methods. Laboratory experiments on flight structures. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 331. Flight Control Systems I. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 355. Linear system analysis. Control system designs using root-locus and frequency response methods. Applications in flight control systems. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 343. Aerodynamics II. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 311 and enrollment in 343L. Incompressible, subsonic, transonic, supersonic, hypersonic flow over airfoils and wings. Viscous flow theory. Laminar boundary layers. Transition and turbulent flow. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 343L. Aerodynamics Laboratory II. (0-2) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Enrollment in 343. Advanced concepts in aerodynamics and propulsion through laboratory experience. Experiments include model tests. Techniques in subsonic and supersonic measurements. Report writing.

Aer E 351. Astrodynamics I. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: E M 345, Aer E 261, Credit or enrollment in Aer E 243. Introduction to astrodynamics. Two-body motion. Geocentric, lunar and interplanetary trajectories and applications. Launch and atmospheric re-entry trajectories. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 355. Aircraft Flight Dynamics and Control. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 261, Math 267, E M 345. Aircraft rigid body equations of motion, linearization, and modal analysis. Longitudinal and lateral-directional static and dynamic stability analysis. Flight handling characteristics analysis. Longitudinal and lateral-directional open loop response to aircraft control inputs. Aircraft flight handling qualities. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 361. Computational Techniques for Aerospace Design. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 243, Math 267, E M 324, E M 345. Advanced programming, workstation environment, and development of computational tools for aerospace analysis and design. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 391. Aerospace Seminar. Cr. R. F. (1-0) Professional skills development activities including: resume building, interviewing, program of study specialization considerations, post baccalaureate study options, career planning.
H. Honors

Aer E 392. Aerospace Seminar. Cr. R. S. (1-0) Professional skills development activities including: program of study specialization considerations, post baccalaureate study options, career planning. Preliminary senior design project planning and mentor selection. Satisfactory-fail only.
H. Honors

Aer E 396. Summer Internship. Cr. R. Repeatable. SS. Prereq: Permission of department and Engineering Career Services. Summer professional work period. Students must register for this course prior to commencing work. Satisfactory-fail only.

Aer E 397. Engineering Internship. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: Permission of department and Engineering Career Services. Professional work period, one semester maximum per academic year. Students must register for this course prior to commencing work. Satisfactory-fail only.

Aer E 398. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: 298, permission of department and Engineering Career Services. Second professional work period in the cooperative education program. Students must register for this course prior to commencing work. Satisfactory-fail only.

Aer E 411. Aerospace Vehicle Propulsion I. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 311. Atmospheric propulsion system performance and cycle analysis. Momentum theorem, thrust and propulsive efficiency. Thermodynamics of compressible flow with heat and work addition. Components and principles of turbojets and turbofans. Rocket engines and ramjet principles. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 412. Aerospace Vehicle Propulsion II. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 343, 411. Electricity and magnetism. Plasma physics. Ion engine performance. Introduction to advanced electromagnetic propulsion systems. Energy sources and nuclear propulsion. Low thrust mission analysis. Space mission requirements Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 417. Experimental Mechanics. (Cross-listed with E M). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: E M 324. Introduction of different aspects of measuring deformation, strains, and stress for practical engineering problems. Strain gage theory and application. Selected laboratory experiments. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 421. Advanced Flight Structures. (2-1) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 321, Math 266 or 267. Analysis of indeterminate flight structures including finite element laboratory. Static analysis of complex structural components subject to thermal and aerodynamic loads. Analytical and finite element solutions for stresses and displacements of membrane, plane stress, plate structures. Buckling of beams, frames, and plate structures. Introduction to vibration of flight structures. Steady state and transient structural response using normal modal analysis. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 422. Vibrations and Aeroelasticity. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 321, Math 266 or 267. Single and multiple degree of freedom vibration. Free and forced vibration. Matrix methods. Modal analysis, static aeroeasticity-divergence, control surface reversal. Dynamic aeroelasticty-flutter. Application of finite element technique (ANSYS) to aeroelasticity problems. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 423. Composite Flight Structures. (2-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: E M 324; Mat E 272. Fabrication, testing and analysis of composite materials used in flight structures. Basic laminate theory of beams, plates and shells. Manufacturing and machining considerations of various types of composites. Testing of composites for material properties, strength and defects. Student projects required. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 426. Design of Aerospace Structures. (1-6) Cr. 3. Prereq: E M 324. Detailed design and analysis of aerospace vehicle structures. Material selection, strength, durability and damage tolerance, and validation analysis. Design for manufacturability. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 432. Flight Control Systems II. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 331. Aircraft lateral directional stability augmentation. Launch vehicle pitch control system design. Control of flexible vehicles. Satellite attitude control. Flight control designs based on state-space methods. Introduction to sample-data systems. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 442. V/STOL Aerodynamics and Performance. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 355. Introduction to the aerodynamics, performance, stability, control and critical maneuvering characteristics of V/STOL vehicles. Topics include hovercrafts, jet flaps, ducted fans and thrust vectored engines. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 446. Computational Fluid Dynamics. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 343. Introduction to modern computational fluid dynamics. Finite difference and finite volume methods. Explicit, implicit, and iterative techniques. Solutions of elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations. Emphasis on applications. Commercial software. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 448. Fluid Dynamics of Turbomachinery. (Cross-listed with M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: M E 335 or equivalent. Applications of principles of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics in performance analysis and design of turbomachines and related fluid system components. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 451. Astrodynamics II. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 351. Simple orbit determination and prediction. Advanced orbit maneuvers, single-, double-, and triple-impulse; fixed-impulse, finite-duration. 3-D rigid-body dynamics, Euler's equations, satelitte stabilization and attitude control. Earth gravity field models and gravity harmonics, orbit perturbations, variational methods, relative orbital mechanics, Clohessy-Wiltshire equations. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 461. Modern Design Methodology with Aerospace Applications. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 361, 311, 321, 351, 355. Introduction to modern engineering design methodology. Computational constrained optimal design approach including selection of objective function, characterization of constraint system, materials and strength considerations, and sensitivity analyses. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 462. Design of Aerospace Systems. (1-4) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: 461. Fundamental principles used in engineering design of aircraft, missile, and space systems. Preliminary design of aerospace vehicles.

Aer E 464. Spacecraft Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 351. An examination of spacecraft systems including attitude determination and control, power, thermal control, communications, propulsion, guidance, navigation, command and data handling, and mechanisms. Explanation of space and operational environments as they impact spacecraft design. Includes discussion of safety, reliability, quality, maintainability, testing, cost, legal, and logistics issues. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Aer E 490. Independent Study. Cr. 1-6. Repeatable. Prereq: Junior or senior classification, approval of the department.
A. Aero and/or Gas Dynamics
B. Propulsion
C. Aerospace Structures
D. Flight Dynamics
E. Spacecraft Systems
F. Flight Control Systems
G. Aeroelasticity
H. Honors
I. Design
J. Non-destructive Evaluation
K. Wind Engineering
L. Multi-functional Ultra-light Structures
O. Other

Aer E 491. Aerospace Seminar. Cr. R. F.S. (1-0) Professional skills development activities. Designed to encourage involvement in a variety of aerospace engineering activities and related professional activities. Engineering ethics case studies and discussions. Academic program planning, departmental symposium participation.

Aer E 492. Aerospace Seminar. Cr. R. F.S. (1-0) Professional skills development activities. Writing and presentation of a technical paper at the department's Aerospace Symposium or at a recognized student or professional meeting of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Satisfactory-fail only.

Aer E 498. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: 398, permission of department and Engineering Career Services. Third and subsequent professional work periods in the cooperative education program. Students must register for this course before commencing work. Satisfactory-fail only.

Aer E 499. Senior Project. Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: Senior classification, credit or enrollment in 491. Development of aerospace principles and concepts through individual research and projects. Written report.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduate students

Aer E 514. Advanced Mechanics of Materials. (Cross-listed with E M). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: E M 324. Theory of stress and strain, stress-strain relationships. Unsymmetrical bending, curved beams, shear center. Torsion of thin-walled noncircular sections. Equilibrium, compatibility equations. Airy stress functions. Membrane stresses in shells, thick-walled cylinders.

Aer E 517. Experimental Mechanics. (Cross-listed with E M). (3-2) Cr. 4. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: E M 510 or 514 or 516. Fundamental concepts for force, displacement, stress, and strain measurements. Strain gages. Full field deformation measurements with laser interferometry and digital image processing. Advanced experimental concepts at the micro and nano scale regimes.

Aer E 521. Airframe Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 421 or E M 424. Analysis of static stresses and deformation in continuous aircraft structures. Various analytical and approximate methods of analysis of isotropic and anisotropic plates and shells.

Aer E 524. Numerical Mesh Generation. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Math 385, proficiency in programming. Introduction to modern mesh generation techniques. Structured and unstructured mesh methods, algebraic and PDE methods, elliptic and hyperbolic methods, variational methods, error analysis, Delaunay triangulation, data structures, geometric modeling with B-spline and NURBS surfaces, surface meshing.

Aer E 525. Finite Element Analysis. (Cross-listed with E M). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: E M 425, Math 385. Variational and weighted residual approach to finite element equations. Emphasis on two- and three-dimensional problems in solid mechanics. Isoparametric element formulation, higher order elements, numerical integration, imposition of constraints and penalty, convergence, and other more advanced topics. Use of two- and three-dimensional computer programs. Dynamic and vibrational problems, eigenvalues, and time integration. Introduction to geometric and material nonlinearities.

Aer E 531. Automatic Control of Flight Vehicles. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 331. Applications of classical and modern linear control theory to automatic control of flight vehicles. Spacecraft attitude control. Control of flexible vehicles. Linear-quadratic regulator design applications.

Aer E 532. Compressible Fluid Flow. (Cross-listed with M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: M E 335 or Aer E 541. Thermodynamics of compressible flow. Viscous and inviscid compressible flow equations. One dimensional steady flow; isentropic flow, normal shock waves oblique and curved shocks, constant area flow with friction and heat transfer. Linear theory and Prandtl-Glauert similarity. Method of characteristics. Subsonic, transonic, supersonic and hypersonic flows.

Aer E 541. Incompressible Flow Aerodynamics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 343 or M E 335. Kinematics and dynamics of fluid flow. Derivation of the Navier-Stokes, Euler and potential flow equations. Introduction to generalized curvilinear coordinates. Ideal fluids. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional potential flow. Complex variable methods.

Aer E 543. Viscous Flow Aerodynamics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 541. Navier-Stokes equations. Incompressible and compressible boundary layers. Similarity solutions. Computational and general solution methods. Introduction to stability of laminar flows, transition and turbulent flow.

Aer E 546. Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer I. (Cross-listed with M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 541 or ME 538. Introduction to finite difference and finite volume methods used in modern engineering. Basic concepts of discretization, consistency, and stability. Applications of numerical methods to selected model partial differential equations.

Aer E 547. Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer II. (Cross-listed with M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: M E 546. Application of computational methods to current problems in fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Methods for solving the Navier-Stokes and reduced equation sets such as the Euler, boundary layer, and parabolized forms of the conservation equations. Introduction to relevant aspects of grid generation and turbulence modeling.

Aer E 551. Orbital Mechanics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 351. Review of 2-body problem. Orbital maneuvers. Relative motion in orbit. Orbit perturbation analysis. Gravity field expansions and effects on orbiters. 3-body problem with applications.

Aer E 556. Guidance and Navigation of Aerospace Vehicles. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 331. Principles of guidance systems for spacecraft, launch vehicles, homing and ballistic missiles. Optimal guidance. Interplanetary transfer guidance with low thrust. Principles of inertial navigation. Theory and applications of the Global Positioning System. Celestial navigation procedures. Application of Kalman filtering to recursive navigation theory.

Aer E 565. Systems Engineering and Analysis. (Cross-listed with E E, I E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Graduate classification in engineering. Introduction to organized multidisciplinary approach to designing and developing systems. Concepts, principles, and practice of systems engineering as applied to large integrated systems. Life-cycle costing, scheduling, risk management, functional analysis, conceptual and detail design, test evaluation, and systems engineering planning and organization.

Aer E 566. Avionics Systems Engineering. (Cross-listed with E E). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: E E 565. Avionics functions. Applications of systems engineering principles to avionics. Top-down design of avionics systems. Automated design tools.

Aer E 569. Mechanics of Composite and Combined Materials. (Cross-listed with E M). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: E M 324. Mechanics of fiber-reinforced materials. Micromechanics of lamina. Macromechanical behavior of lamina and laminates. Strength and interlaminar stresses of laminates. Failure criteria. Stress analysis of laminates. Thermal moisture and residual stresses. Joints in composites.

Aer E 570. Wind Engineering. (Cross-listed with E M). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: E M 378, 345. Atmospheric circulations, atmospheric boundary layer wind, bluff-body aerodynamics, aeroelastic phenomena, wind-tunnel and full-scale testing, wind-load code and standards, effect of tornado and thunderstorm winds, design applications.

Aer E 572. Turbulence. (Cross-listed with Ch E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2008. Prereq: 543 or M E 538. Qualitative features of turbulence. Statistical and spectral representation of turbulent velocity fields: averages, moments, correlations, length and time scales and the energy cascade. Averaged equations of motion, closure requirements, Reynolds stress, dissipation rate. Isotropic turbulence, homogeneous shear flows, free shear flows, wall bounded flows. Scalar transport, particulate transport.

Aer E 573. Random Signal Analysis and Kalman Filtering. (Cross-listed with E E, MAth, M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: E E 324 or Aer E 331 or M E 370 or 411 or Math 341 or 395. Elementary notions of probability. Random processes. Autocorrelation and spectral functions. Estimation of spectrum from finite data. Response of linear systems to random inputs. Discrete and continuous Kalman filter theory and applications. Smoothing and prediction. Linearization of nonlinear dynamics.

Aer E 574. Optimal Control. (Cross-listed with E E, MAth, M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: E E 577. The optimal control problem. Variational approach. Pontryagin's principle. Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Dynamic programming. Time-optimal, minimum fuel, minimum energy control systems. The regulator problem. Structures and properties of optimal controls.

Aer E 575. Introduction to Robust Control. (Cross-listed with E E, MAth, M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: E E 577. Introduction to modern robust control. Model and signal uncertainty in control systems. Uncertainty description. Stability and performance robustness to uncertainty. Solutions to the H2, Hoo, and l1 control problems. Tools for robustness analysis and synthesis.

Aer E 576. Digital Feedback Control Systems. (Cross-listed with E E, MAth, M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: E E 475 or Aer E 432 or M E 411 or 414 or Math 415; and Math 267. Sampled data, discrete data, and the z-transform. Design of digital control systems using transform methods; root locus, frequency response and direct design methods. Design using state-space methods. Controllability, observability, pole placement, state estimators. Digital filters in control systems. Microcomputer implementation of digital filters. Finite wordlength effects. Linear quadratic optimal control in digital control systems. Simulation of digital control systems.

Aer E 577. Linear Systems. (Cross-listed with E E, MAth, M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: E E 324 or Aer E 331 or M E 414 or Math 415; and Math 307. State variable and input-output descriptions of linear continuous-time and discrete time systems. Solution of linear dynamical equations. Controllability and observability of linear dynamical systems. Canonical descriptions of linear equations. Irreducible realizations of rational transfer function matrices. Canonical form dynamical equations. State feedback. State estimators. Decoupling by state feedback. Design of feedback systems. Stability of linear dynamical systems.

Aer E 578. Nonlinear Systems. (Cross-listed with E E, MAth, M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: E E 577. Classification of nonlinear control systems. Existence and uniqueness of solutions. Approximate analysis methods. Periodic orbits. Concept of stability and Lyapunov stability theory. Absolute stability of feedback systems. Input-output stability. Passivity.

Aer E 581. Perturbation Methods. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2007. Prereq: Math 267. Mathematical perturbation methods with applications to ordinary differential equations. Perturbation expansions. Order of magnitude and gauge functions. Matched asymptotic expansions. Boundary layer problems. Multiple scales. Resonance and mode coupling. Solvability conditions for differential equations. Physical and engineering applications.

Aer E 590. Special Topics. Cr. 1-5. Repeatable.
A. Aero and/or Gas Dynamics
B. Propulsion
C. Aerospace Structures
D. Flight Dynamics
E. Spacecraft Systems
F. Flight Control Systems
G. Aeroelasticity
H. Viscous Aerodynamics
I. Design
J. Hypersonics
K. Computational Aerodynamics
L. Optimization
M. Non Destructive Evaluation
N. Wind Engineering

Aer E 591. Graduate Student Seminar Series. Cr. R. Repeatable. Presentation of professional topics by department graduate students. Development of presentation skills used in a professional conference setting involving question and answer format.

Aer E 599. Creative Component. Cr. 1-5. Repeatable.

Courses for graduate students

Aer E 647. Advanced High Speed Computational Fluid Dynamics. (Cross-listed with M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2008. Prereq: 547. An examination of current methods in computational fluid dynamics. Differencing strategies. Advanced solution algorithms. Grid generation. Construction of complex CFD algorithms. Current applications. Use of state of the art CFD codes.

Aer E 690. Advanced Topics. Cr. 1-5. Repeatable.
A. Aero and/or Gas Dynamics
B. Propulsion
C. Aerospace Structures
D. Flight Dynamics
E. Spacecraft Systems
F. Flight Control Systems
G. Aeroelasticity
H. Viscous Aerodynamics
I. Design
J. Hypersonics
K. Computational Aerodynamics
L. Non Destructive Evaluation
M. Wind Engineering

Aer E 697. Engineering Internship. Cr. R. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of DOGE (Director of Graduate Education), graduate classification. One semester and one summer maximum per academic year professional work period. Satisfactory-fail only.

Aer E 699. Research. Cr. arr. Repeatable.