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100 |200 | 300 | 400 | Graduate Courses | Gulf Coast Research Laboratory

Zoology and Genetics
www.mbb.iastate.edu/htm/index.html
M. Duane Enger, Chair of Department
University Professors: Dolphin
Professors: Ackerman, Atherly, Brendel, Campbell, Drewes, Enger, Henderson, Howell, J. Johansen,
K. Johansen, Lee, Mayfield, Myers, Peterson, Schnable, Shen, Voytas
Professors (Collaborators): Haydon, Link, Palmer, Shoemaker
Distinguished Professors (Emeritus): Tauber, Ulmer
University Professors (Emeritus): Stadler
Professors (Emeritus): Bishop, Brown, Buttrey, Hollander, Imsande, Jeska, Miller, Mutchmor, Pattee, Pollak, Redmond, Robertson, Welshons
Associate Professors: Ambrosio, Becraft, Buss, Dobbs, Emery, Farrar, Ford, Girton, Gu, Ingebritsen, Janzen, McCloskey, Minion, Naylor, Peterson, Powell, Sakaguchi, Viles, C. Vleck
Associate Professors (Adjunct): D. Vleck
Associate Professors (Collaborators): Mahajan, Tucker
Associate Professors (Emeritus): Shaw
Assistant Professors: Adams, Chou, Dorman, Powell-Coffman
Assistant Professors (Adjunct): Bronikowski, Coffman, Pleasants
Instructors (Adjunct): Doyle, Leshem-Ackerman, Miller
Instructors (Collaborators): Bowman, Sime

Undergraduate Study
The department offers majors in genetics, zoology and co-administers biology. The zoology and genetics majors are available to students in both the College of Agriculture and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The programs for these majors are listed below and under the Curricula in Agriculture. College requirements can be found under Curricula in Agriculture and Curriculum in Liberal Arts and Sciences. The department offers minors in both genetics and zoology. B.S./M.S. programs are available in which a student, with proper planning, can complete the requirements for both bachelor's and master's degrees in five years. Students interested in the B.S./M.S. program must apply during their sophomore year.

Training in genetics, zoology or biology may lead to employment in teaching, research, or any of a variety of health-related professions. In most cases, students should plan on continuing their education in graduate or professional school. Students with the B.S.degree may expect to find employment in the biotechnology, health, or food industries. Recent graduates have also developed careers in conservation biology, technical writing, science journalism, technical sales, business, and genetic counseling.

The required course work and associated electives are designed to provide students with knowledge of the basic biological sciences, mathematics, chemistry, and physics. This background is essential for professions involving modern biological sciences. As part of these courses, students develop skills in problem solving, critical thinking, writing, research-related activities and an introduction to biological professions.

The respective communications and English proficiency requirements of both colleges are met by an average of C or better in Engl 104, 105 or 105H, and an additional English writing course. The lowest grade acceptable in any of these courses is C-. Students in the College of Agriculture must also achieve a C or better in an oral communications course.
A grade of C- or better is required in all biological science courses within the majors with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0.

Specific entrance requirements for medical and health-related professions are established by the professional schools. Students interested in fulfilling preprofessional requirements for such professions as cytotechnology, dental hygiene, dentistry, human medicine, medical technology, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, physical therapy, physicians assistant, and veterinary medicine can major in either genetics or zoology while fulfilling the preprofessional requirements. (See Preprofessional Study.)

Genetics
Genetics is the scientific study of heredity. The understanding of heredity is fundamental to all the biological sciences. The department offers a full range of instruction in all aspects of genetics from the molecular genetics of microorganisms to population genetics.
In addition to basic degree requirements listed in the Curricula in Agriculture or the Curriculum in Liberal Arts and Sciences, genetics majors must satisfy the following requirements:

1. Biol 201, 201L, 202, 202L, 301, 301L, 302, 302L, 303, and Micro 302.
2. Gen 110, 410, 411, 491, and either 462 or 563.
3. Eleven credits of calculus and statistics including at least one course in each.
4. Three years of chemistry and biochemistry.
5. One year of general college physics.
6. Nine credits for the degree in the College of Agriculture, and 6 credits for the degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, of support electives chosen from an approved list.
7. Majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must take one course that involves both humanities and biology such as history of science or bioethics. This course may also count toward a college group requirement. A list of acceptable courses is available from the departmental office.
8. Majors in the College of Agriculture must include Biol (A Ecl) 312 in their program.
The department offers a minor in genetics that may be earned by completing Biol 301, 301L, 302, 302L, Gen 410, 411 and 491. A Genetics major may not double major or minor in Biology.

Zoology
The study of zoology includes all aspects of animal life. The department offers instruction in a wide range of zoological subjects ranging from the structure and function of cells to the behavior of animals and their populations.
In addition to the basic degree requirements listed in the Curricula in Agriculture and the Curriculum in Liberal Arts and Sciences, zoology majors (including those preparing for professional programs in medical and other health-related fields) must complete satisfactorily the following requirements.

1. Zool 110, Biol 201, 201L, 202, 202L, 301, 301L, 302, 302L, and Zool 355.
2. Zoology electives: 17 credits in zoology at the 300 level or above are required including seven credits at the 400 level or above and two laboratory courses with at least one at the 400 level. Biol 312, 303, and Gen 462 or Gen 563 are also acceptable electives. A maximum of 4 credits of 490R and no credits of 490S and 490U may be used toward the 17 credits; however, only 2 credits of 490R may be applied to the requirement of seven 400 or above credits and no 490R credits can be applied to the laboratory requirement. The 17 credits must also include at least one organismal course.
3. Two years of chemistry or biochemistry totaling 15 credits to include one year of general chemistry with laboratory and at least one semester of organic chemistry with laboratory.
4. Eleven credits of calculus and statistics including at least one course in each.
5. One year of general college physics.
6. Majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must take one course that involves both humanities and biology such as history of science or bioethics. This course may also count toward a college group requirement. A list of acceptable courses is available in the department office.
7. Majors in the College of Agriculture must take 6 credits of agricultural biology electives. This requirement is satisfied by passing six credits at the 300 level or above from the departments of Animal Ecology, Animal Science, or Entomology.
8. Majors in the College of Agriculture must include Biol (A Ecl) 312 in their program.

Majors are encouraged to take advantage of special opportunities available in summer courses at the Iowa Lakeside Laboratory at Lake Okoboji and at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, Ocean Springs, Mississippi. (See Index.). Generally, these credits may be applied toward the zoology elective requirement. Interested students should consult their advisers.
The department offers a minor in zoology which may be earned by receiving credit for Biol 301, 301L, 302, 302L, Zool 355, and 3 additional zoology credits taken at the 300 level or above. A Zoology major may not double major or minor in Biology.

Information of the faculty, programs, staff and course requirements for the genetics or zoology major can be found at the Zoology and Genetics web site: www.mbb.iastate.edu/htm/index.html
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Graduate Study
The department offers work for the master of science and doctor of philosophy degrees.
A student majoring in zoology may specialize in animal behavior, animal models of gene therapy, cell biology, comparative physiology, developmental biology, ecology, endocrinology, immunobiology, molecular biology, neurobiology, or physiology.

Students entering any graduate major or program in the department need a sound background in the biological, physical, and mathematical sciences and must be committed to research. Applicants are required to submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores for both the aptitude and the biology advanced tests.

Many of the graduate students in the department are in interdepartmental graduate majors or interdepartmental graduate programs, such as: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Immunobiology; Interdepartmental Genetics; Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology and Neuroscience.

The requirements for the genetics major can be found under Genetics in the separate interdepartmental listing.

Specific course requirements for advanced degrees depend largely upon previous training and experience in the major area of specialization. There is no foreign language requirement. Certification in the use of written English is required. All graduate students must acquire teaching experience, usually in laboratory courses, as part of their graduate program. All graduate students will participate in a journal club seminar and a research seminar in their area of interest each academic year.

Courses open for nonmajor graduate credit: Zool 355, 403I, 404I, 405, 415I, 419I, 420I, 428, 454, 456, 459, 462, 464: Gen 410, 411, 462, 495.

Zoology (Zool)
Courses Primarily for Undergraduate Students
Zool 110. Zoology Orientation. (1-0) Cr. 0.5. F. First 8 weeks. Orientation to the area of zoology. For students considering a major in zoology. Specializations and career opportunities in the zoological sciences, including medically related professions. Offered on a satisfactory-fail grading basis only.

Zool 155. Introduction to the Human Body. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: H.S. biology and chemistry or Biol 109 . A survey course of the human body including principal structures and functions of the body systems and the diseases and disorders associated with them. Designed to meet general education requirements in natural science. Not recommended for those seeking a career in the allied health professions or for students majoring in life science.

Zool 156. Introduction to the Human Body - Laboratory. (0-3) Cr. 1. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 155. A "hands-on" introduction to selected aspects of the human body through the use of models, specimens, videos, student conducted experiments and computerized demonstrations.

Zool 255. Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology - Part I. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Fundamentals of the human body systems including anatomy and physiology and related diseases and disorders. Part 1 of a two semester sequence. Designed for students preparing for careers in health professions, dietetics and athletic training. Not recommended for dental or medical school. Part 1 covers the nervous, muscular, skeletal, endocrine and integumentary systems. Part 2 (offered spring semesters) covers the cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Premed students and those majoring in biological sciences should consider Zool 320 and 355 for their anatomy and physiology background.

Zool 255L. Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology - Laboratory - Part I. (0-3) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 255. A "hands-on" learning experience of human anatomy and physiology through the use of models, specimens, videos, student conducted experiments and computerized demonstrations. Part 1 covers the nervous, muscular, skeletal, endocrine and integumentary systems.

Zool 256. Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology - Part II. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Fundamentals of the human body systems including anatomy and physiology and related diseases and disorders. Part 2 of a two semester sequence. Designed for students preparing for careers in the health professions, dietetics, and athletic training. Not recommended for dental or medical school. Part 2 covers the cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Part 1 (offered fall semesters) covers the nervous, muscular, skeletal, endocrine and integumentary systems. Premed students and those majoring in biological sciences should consider Zool 320 and 355 for their anatomy and physiology background.

Zool 256L. Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology - Laboratory - Part II. (0-3) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 256. A "hands-on" learning experience of human anatomy and physiology through the use of models, specimens, videos, student conducted experiements and computerized demonstrations. Part 2 covers the cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems.

Zool 258. Human Reproduction. (Same as W S 258.) (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2004. Prereq: 155 or Biol 109 or 201. Anatomy and physiology of human reproductive systems, including fertility, pregnancy, and delivery.

Zool 298. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of the department cooperative education coordinator; sophomore classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Zool 301I. Iowa Natural History. (Same as Ia LL 301I.) See Iowa Lakeside Laboratory.

Zool 303. Biological Evolution. (Same as Biol 303.) See Biology.

Zool 304. Animal Behavior. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Biol 202. Ethological and sociobiological approaches to animal behavior. Genetic and developmental aspects of behavior, biological rhythms, orientation (including navigation, migration), communication, and social behavior (mating, aggression, parental care).

Zool 304L. Laboratory in Animal Behavior. (0-3) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in Zool 304. Laboratory techniques for observation, description and analysis of animal activities; independent projects.

Zool 310. Brain and Behavior. (Same as Psych 310.) See Psychology.

Zool 311. Introduction to Parasitology. (Same as Micro 311.) (3-3) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: Biol 202. Biology and host-parasite relationships of major groups of animal parasites, and techniques of diagnosing and studying parasites.

Zool 312I. Ecology. (Same as Ia LL 312I.) See Iowa Lakeside Laboratory.

Zool 320. Comparative Chordate Anatomy. (3-4) Cr. 5. F. Prereq: Biol 202, junior classification. The evolution of chordates as reflected in the anatomy of extinct and living forms. Lecture topics include the history and diversity of chordates; comparisons of anatomic structures among major groups, the adaptive significance of anatomic structures. Laboratory involves dissection of representative species.

Zool 322. Vertebrate Histology. (3-3) Cr. 4. S. Prereq: Biol 202. Microscopic structure of vertebrate tissues and organs, with an introduction to histological techniques.

Zool 334. Embryology. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: Biol 202. Basic principles and processes of development. Course will cover classical as well as current aspects of developmental biology. Emphasis will be on vertebrate model systems. Not acceptable for credit in the major for Genetics or Zoology majors.

Zool 334L. Embryology Laboratory. (0-3) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 334. Selected experiments demonstrating basic concepts in development. Mixture of live embryo experiments and vertebrate developmental anatomy.

Zool 355. Principles of Physiology. (3-4) Cr. 5. F.S. Prereq: Biol 302. Introduction to systemic functions with emphasis on mammals. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Zool 383. Women in Science and Engineering. (Same as W S 383.) (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2003. Prereq: A 200 level course in science, engineering or women's studies; Engl 105. The interrelationships of women and science and engineering examined from historical, sociological, philosophical, and biological perspectives. Factors contributing to under-representation; feminist critiques of science; examination of successful strategies.

Zool 398. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of the department cooperative education coordinator; junior classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Zool 403I. Evolution. (Same as Ia LL 403I.) See Iowa Lakeside Laboratory. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Zool 404I. Behavioral Ecology. (Same as Ia LL 404I.) See Iowa Lakeside Laboratory. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Zool 405. Biology of Invertebrates. (Dual-listed with 505.) (3-0) Cr. 3 or (3-2) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: Biol 302. Emphasis on diversity, development, physiology and behavior of invertebrate organisms - the "spineless wonders" of the world. Laboratory emphasizes hands-on study and experimentation with living invertebrates. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Zool 415I. Freshwater Invertebrates. (Same as Ia LL 415I.) See Iowa Lakeside Laboratory. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Zool 419I. Vertebrate Ecology and Evolution. (Same as Ia LL 419I.) See Iowa Lakeside Laboratory. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Zool 420I. Amphibians and Reptiles. (Same as Ia LL 420I.) See Iowa Lakeside Laboratory. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Zool 428. Cell Biology. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Biol 302. Biological organization and function at the cellular level. Emphasis on biomembranes. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Zool 433. Developmental Biology. (Same as Biol 433.) (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Biol 302. Principles of multicellular development, from gametogenesis and fertilization through reproductive maturity. Emphasis is placed on understanding the underlying mechanisms that govern developmental processes.

Zool 433L. Developmental Biology Laboratory. (Same as Biol 433L.) (0-3) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 433. Experiments and explorations illustrating fundamental principles of multicellular development.

Zool 454. General and Comparative Endocrinology. (Dual-listed with 554.) (3-0) Cr. 3 or (3-3) Cr. 4. S. Prereq: 355 and Biol 302. Chemical integration of vertebrate organisms. The structure, development, and evolution of the endocrine glands and the function and structure of their hormones. Laboratory techniques for studying hormonal phenomena. Laboratory experiments require animal surgery and involvement outside of scheduled class time. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Zool 456. Neurobiology. (Dual-listed with 556.) (3-0) Cr. 3 or (3-3) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: 310 or 355; physics recommended; permission of instructor to enroll in lab. Integration, coding, plasticity, and development in nervous systems. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Zool 459. Environmental Physiology. (Dual-listed with 559.) (3-0) Cr. 3 or (3-3) Cr. 4. Alt. S., offered 2005. Prereq: 355 or A Ecl 311; physics recommended. Physiological adaptations to the environment with an emphasis on vertebrates. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Zool 462. Evolutionary Genetics. (Dual-listed with 562; same as Gen 462.) See Genetics. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Zool 464. Morphometric Analysis. (Dual-listed with 564.) (3-2) Cr. 4. S. Prereq: Stat 401. A comprehensive overview of the theory and methods for the analysis of biological shape with emphasis on data acquisition, standardization, statistical analysis, and visualization of results. Methods for both landmark and outline data will be discussed. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Zool 490. Independent Study. Prereq: 15 credits in zoological sciences; permission of instructor. Students in the College of Agriculture may use no more than 6 credits of 490 toward the total of 128 credits required for graduation; students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may use no more than 9 credits of 490 toward graduation.
I. Iowa Lakeside Laboratory.
R. Zoology research. Cr. 1 to 5 each time taken.
S. Attendance and critique of zoology seminars. Cr. 1. Offered on a satisfactory-fail grading basis only.
U. Laboratory teaching experience. Cr. 1 to 2. For students registering to be undergraduate laboratory assistants. Offered on a satisfactory-fail grading basis only.

Zool 498. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of the department cooperative education coordinator; senior classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Courses Primarily for Graduate Students, Open to Qualified Undergraduate Students

Zool 501. Principles of Toxicology. (Same as Tox 501, VDPAM 501.) See Toxicology or Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine.

Zool 502. Methods of Toxicology. (Same as Tox 502, VDPAM 502.) See Toxicology or Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine.

Zool 505. Biology of Invertebrates. (Dual-listed with 405.) (3-0) Cr. 3 or (3-2) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: Biol 302. Emphasis on diversity, development, physiology and behavior of invertebrate organisms - the "spineless wonders" of the world. Laboratory emphasizes hands-on study and experimentation with living invertebrates.

Zool 507. Advanced Animal Behavior. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: 304; permission of instructor. Analysis of current research in animal behavior with emphasis on physiological or endocrine control mechanisms.

Zool 511I. Field Parasitology. (Same as Ia LL 511I.) See Iowa Lakeside Laboratory.

Zool 515. Ecology of Freshwater Invertebrates. (Same as A Ecl 515.) See Animal Ecology.

Zool 528. Cellular Growth and Regulation. (Same as MCDB 528.) (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Courses in cell biology and biochemistry. Cell cycle, regulation of cell growth, cell division, membranes, transport processes, and regulation of cellular activities.

Zool 533. Principles of Developmental Biology. (Same as MCDB 533.) (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2003. Prereq: Biol 302. Fundamental principles in multicellular development. Emphasis on understanding evolutionary conserved cellular and molecular regulatory processes as illustrated in classical studies and current literature.

Zool 540. Signal Transduction. (Same as BBMB 540, MCDB 540.) (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2005. Prereq: 528, BBMB 404. Mechanisms and components of cellular signal transduction including receptors, G-proteins, second messengers, protein phosphorylation, other post-translational protein modifications, and transcriptional regulation.

Zool 542. Introduction to Molecular Biology Techniques. (Same as BBMB 542, BCB 542, BMS 542, Bot 542, FS HN 542, Hort 542, NREM 542, VDPAM 542, V MPM 542.) Cr. 1 per module. F.S.SS. Prereq: Graduate classification. Workshops in basic molecular biology techniques and related procedures. Offered on a satisfactory-fail grading basis only.
A. DNA Techniques. Includes genetic engineering procedures, sequencing, PCR, and genotyping.(F.S.SS.)
B. Protein Techniques. Includes fermentation, protein isolation, protein purification, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, NMR, confocal microscopy and laser microdissection, immunophenotyping, and monoclonal antibody production. (S.SS.)
C. Cell Techniques. Includes immunophyenotyping, ELISA, flow cytometry, microscopic techniques, and image analysis. (F.S.)
D. Plant Transformation. Includes Agrobacterium and particle gun-mediated transformation of tobacco, Arabidopsis, and maize, and analysis of transformants. (S.)
E. Proteomics. Includes two-dimensional electrophoresis, laser scanning, mass spectrometry, and database searching. (F.)

Zool 554. General and Comparative Endocrinology. (Dual-listed with 454.) (3-0) Cr. 3 or (3-3) Cr. 4. S. Prereq: 355 and Biol 302. Graduate study in conjunction with 454. Chemical integration of vertebrate organisms. The structure, development, and evolution of the endocrine glands and the function and structure of their hormones. Laboratory techniques for studying hormonal phenomena. Laboratory experiments require animal surgery and involvement outside of scheduled class time.

Zool 556. Neurobiology. (Dual-listed with 456; same as Neuro 556.) (3-0) Cr. 3 or (3-3) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: 355 or 310; physics recommended; permission of instructor to enroll in lab. Graduate study in conjunction with 456. Integration, coding, plasticity, and development in nervous systems.

Zool 557. Advanced Neuroscience Techniques. (Same as Neuro 557.) See Neuroscience.

Zool 559. Environmental Physiology. (Dual-listed with 459.) (3-0) Cr. 3 or (3-3) Cr. 4. Alt. S., offered 2005. Prereq: 355 or A Ecl 311, physics recommended. Graduate study in conjunction with 459. Physiological adaptations to the environment with emphasis on vertebrates.

Zool 562. Evolutionary Genetics.
(Dual-listed with 462; same as Gen 562.) See Genetics.

Zool 563. Molecular Phylogenetics. (Same as Gen 563, Bot 563.) (2-3) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Biol 303 and 301. Estimation of phylogenetic trees from DNA sequence data. Course provides an overview of uses for phylogenetic trees in bioinformatics, genomics, molecular genetic, and systematics and explores the relationship between data, models of molecular evolution and patterns of biological diversification.

Zool 564. Morphometric Analysis. (Dual-listed with 464.) (3-2) Cr. 4. S. Prereq: Stat 401. A comprehensive overview of the theory and methods for the analysis of biological shape with emphasis on data acquisition, standardization, statistical analysis, and visualization of results. Methods for both landmark and outline data will be discussed.

Zool 566. Molecular Evolution. (Same as Bot 566.) See Botany.

Zool 568. Advanced Systematics. (Same as Ent 568.) See Entomology.

Zool 569. Biogeography.Z (Same as Bot 579. ) see Botany.

Zool 590. Special Topics. (Same as Ia LL 590I.) Cr. 1 to 5 each time taken. Prereq: Permission of instructor.

Zool 590I. Graduate Independent Study. (Same as Ia LL 590I.) See Iowa Lakeside Laboratory.

Courses for Graduate Students

Zool 632. Current Topics in Signal Transduction. Cr. 2 to 3 each time taken. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Selected topics in signal transduction events, their molecular mechanisms and their relation to cellular processes. Topics may include cell recognition, second messenger systems, information integration and transfer, cell cycle, cell differentiation, and pattern formation.

Zool 660. Current Topics in Neurobiology and Behavior. (Same as Neuro 660.) Cr. 2 to 3 each time taken. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Topics may include communication, hormones and behavior, neural integration, developmental neurobiology, neuroanatomy and ultrastructure, sensory biology, social behavior, techniques in neurobiology and behavior.

Zool 690. Seminar in Zoology. Cr. 1 each time taken. Journal article critique and discussion by faculty and graduate students. Offered on a satisfactory-fail grading basis only.
A. Cellular, Molecular, and Developmental Biology
B. Biology of Populations and Organisms
C. Neurobiology
D. Physiology
E. Evolution
F. Animal Models of Gene Therapy
G. Behavior
H. Bioinformatics

Zool 696. Research Seminar. Cr. 1 each time taken. Research seminars by faculty and graduate students. Offered on a satisfactory-fail grading basis only.

A. Cellular, Molecular, and Developmental Biology
B. Biology of Populations and Organisms
C. Neurobiology
D. Physiology
E. Evolution
F. Animal Models of Gene Therapy
G. Behavior
H. Bioinformatics

Zool 698. Seminar in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. (Same as MCDB 698.) See Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology.

Zool 699. Research.
I. Iowa Lakeside Laboratory. See Iowa Lakeside Laboratory.

Courses Offered at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (GCRL), Ocean Springs, Mississippi
The Gulf Coast Research Laboratory is affiliated with the University of Southern Mississippi.
Iowa State students may register for the following University of Southern Mississippi/ GCRL courses and transfer them to their ISU degree programs. Written permission of the ISU coordinator for the GCRL, 201 Bessey, is required for this arrangement. Inquire at 201 Bessey for further information.

MAR 301. Marine Biology. (3-2) Cr. 5. SS. Prereq: 8 semester hours of biological sciences. A general introduction to marine biology with emphasis on local fauna and flora.

MAR 303. Beach Fauna. Cr. 2. SS. Prereq: Consent of instructor. An intensive field-oriented course in which students study the abiotic and biotic factors influencing the occurence and distribution of invertebrates in protected and open beach habitats of the northern Gulf of Mexico.

MAR 401. Marine Mammals. (3-2) Cr. 5. SS. Prereq: 13 semester hours of biology including Marine Biology or Marine Ichthyology. An examination of the natural history and population ecology of cetaceans, including life history, distribution, population dynamics, diet and feeding, social structure, evolution, and zoogeography.

MAR 403. Marine Invertebrate Zoology. (3-3) Cr. 6. SS. Prereq: 16 credits in biology, including general zoology and introduction to invertebrate zoology. Concentrated study of free-living, marine and estuarine invertebrates of the Mississippi Sound and adjacent continental shelf of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Emphasis on structure, classification, phylogenetic relationships, larval development, and functional processes.

MAR 408. Marine Ichthyology. (3-3) Cr. 6. SS. Prereq: 16 semester hours of biology. Study of marine fishes including evolutionary relationships, morphology, physiology and zoogeography. The course is intended to familiarize the upper level student with classic and current concepts in marine ichthyology.

MAR 411. Special Topic: Cetacean Behavior and Cognition. Cr. 3. SS. This course will focus on the behavior and communication of marine mammals, particularly dolphins and whales. Particular attention will be given to the roles of maturation and learning in the development of social and communicative behavior, and to the methodological difficulties inherent in the study of such behavior in marine mammals.

 
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