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Catalog 2003-2005
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100-200 | 300 | 400 | Graduate Courses

Geological and Atmospheric Sciences
www.geology.iastate.edu/
Carl E. Jacobson, Chair of Department
Professors: Chen, Gutowski, Jacobson, Sandor, Spry, Takle
Professors (Collaborators): Branstator, Tribbia
Distinguished Professors (Emeritus): Vondra
Professors (Emeritus): Nordlie, Seifert, Yarger
Associate Professors: Beresnev, Burras, Gallus, Iverson, Simpkins, Thompson, Windom
Associate Professors (Collaborators): Burkart, Tomer, Vallier
Associate Professors (Emeritus): Cody
Assistant Professors: Cervato, Fang, Mora, Surge, Wu
Assistant Professors (Adjunct): Dawson, Ewing, Kramer

Undergraduate Study

The department offers courses in Geology and Meteorology. Majors can be earned in earth science (B.A., B.S.), geology (B.S.), and meteorology (B.S.). Candidates for all degrees must satisfy the requirements established by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (see Liberal Arts and Sciences, Curriculum). In addition, the department has requirements for each major.
The bachelor of science in Geology prepares the student for a professional career and/or graduate study in the geological sciences. Students selecting geology as a major will elect an option in traditional geology or environmental geology/hydrogeology. The traditional option prepares a student for employment in state and U.S. geological surveys, mineral and petroleum exploration, and graduate study in most aspects of geology. Required courses in this option include Geol 100, 100L, 102, 102L, 302, 311 (A), 356, 365, 368, 451 and at least 6 credits of geology electives. The environmental geology/hydrogeology option prepares a student for employment in environmental consulting, state and U.S. geological surveys, regulatory agencies, and graduate study in the environmental aspects of geology. Required courses in this option include Geol 100, 100L, 102, 102L, 302, 311(B), 356, 368, 411, 422, 475, and at least 6 credits of geology electives. Required supporting courses include Chem 163, 163L, 164, 164L; Phys 111, 112; Math 165, 166 or Math 181, 182; at least 6 additional credits of mathematics, statistics, agronomy, engineering, or computer science from an approved departmental list. No more than 9 credits in 490 may be counted toward a degree in Geology.
A minor in Geology may be earned by taking 15 credits of geology coursework, including Geol 100 and 100L (or 201), 102, and 102L. The remainder should be at the 300 level or above.
Graduates work to understand natural processes on Earth and other planets. They are able to apply their knowledge of forces and factors that shape the Earth to reconstruct the past and anticipate the future. Graduates provide essential information for solving problems for resource management, environmental protection, and public health, safety, and welfare. They work as consultants on engineering and environmental problems, explorers for new minerals and hydrocarbon resources, researchers, teachers, writers, editors, and museum curators. Graduates are able to integrate field and laboratory data and to prepare reports. They are able to make presentations that include maps and diagrams that illustrate the results of their studies.

The study of Meteorology involves the description of the earth's atmosphere and the processes responsible for its behavior. Students majoring in Meteorology earn the bachelor of science. Successful preparation for professional or graduate work in Meteorology requires that the student develop and integrate a diverse range of skills and knowledge bases. These include weather observing, the physics and dynamics of the global atmosphere, application of new weather technologies, advanced mathematical tools, computer programming and modeling and effective oral and written communication. The faculty view the senior thesis (Meteorology 499), in particular, as a capstone experience in which students demonstrate they have achieved this integration. Also, contemporary meteorology is an earth-system science with ties to a variety of human experiences. The electives and general education requirements of the college are further experiences that the meteorology student must integrate with their core meteorology knowledge in order to function effectively in a global-oriented profession. The program requires the following courses: Mteor 111, 201, 206, 301, 311, 341, 342, 411, 417, 432, 443, 454, and 499. An additional 6 credits must be chosen from Mteor 306, 404, 406, 407, 455, 490, and C E 372. Supporting work is required in areas at least equivalent to Chem 163, 163L, 164; Phys 221, 222; Math 165, 166, 265, 266; Com S 207; Stat 105; Sp Cm 212. A grade of C or better (not C-) is required in each of the following courses to meet minimum graduation requirements for a bachelor of science degree in Meteorology: 206, 301,311, 341, 342, 411, 417, 432, 443, and 454.

Several co-op programs are available for upper division undergraduates. Although a range of opportunities exists for men and women who terminate their studies with a bachelor of science, students who meet the necessary academic standards are encouraged to continue their studies in a graduate program. For these students, minor work is recommended in a mathematical or physical science. Other students can choose a wide range of supporting courses that will contribute to their particular area of interest in meteorology.

The department offers a minor in Meteorology which may be earned by completing 15 credits including Mteor 111, Mteor 206 and Mteor 301. Further information concerning programs of study, including sample degree programs, is available from the department.

The Earth Science major is a broad program that typically emphasizes an interdisciplinary field. Programs leading to the bachelor of science may be individually designed but will include required courses in Geology and Meteorology, and required supporting work in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Specific programs have been designed for students interested in a geology, meteorology, or an environmental earth science emphasis. Programs leading to the bachelor of arts for earth science teaching are available. The latter program must satisfy the requirements of the Teacher Education Program (see Index, Teacher Education).

English proficiency requirement: The department requires a grade of C or better in each of English 104 and 105 (or 105H), and a C or better in English 314 or 302 or Jl MC 347.

Graduate Study

The department offers programs leading to the master of science and doctor of philosophy with majors in Earth Science, Geology, and Meteorology. Program options are available for the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in earth science leading to careers in teaching. The department also cooperates in the interdepartmental major in Water Resources (see Index). Students desiring a major in the above fields normally will have a strong undergraduate background in the physical and mathematical sciences. Individuals desiring to enter a graduate program are evaluated by considering their undergraduate background and performance and their expressed goals.
Programs of study are designed on an individual basis in accordance with requirements of the Graduate College and established requirements for each departmental major. Minor work is normally taken in aerospace engineering, agronomy (soil science), chemistry, civil and construction engineering, computer engineering, computer science, engineering mechanics, materials engineering, mathematics, mechanical engineering, microbiology, physics, or statistics. Departmental requirements provide a strong, broad background in the major and allow considerable flexibility in the program of each individual.

A dissertation is required of all Ph.D. candidates. M.S. students in Geology are required to complete a thesis. The M.S. in Earth Science is available to students electing the non-thesis (Creative Component) option in Geology or Meteorology. A nonthesis option is also offered for the M.S. degree in Meteorology.

Graduates in Geology specialize in a subdiscipline, but they comprehend and can communicate the basic principles of geology and supporting sciences. They possess the capacity for critical and independent thinking. They are able to write a fundable research proposal, evaluate current relevant literature, carry out the proposed research, and communicate the results of their research to peers at national meetings and to the general public. They work as consultants on engineering and environmental problems, explorers for new minerals and hydrocarbon resources, researchers, teachers, writers, editors, and museum curators.

All candidates for an advanced degree in Meteorology are expected to complete Mteor 542, 543, and 555. In addition, students without prior synoptic course-work must complete Mteor 511; other students must complete Mteor 507 or Agron 507. Students must also complete Mteor 504 (or Agron 504) or Mteor 605 or Agron 505.

Graduates in Meteorology have a good comprehension of basic principles, a capacity for critical and independent thought and an ability to communicate effectively with scientific colleagues. They have an appropriate breadth in their understanding of meteorology with a suitable specialization. Graduates are able to undertake thorough research and explain the results in a scientifically reasonable fashion.

Courses open for nonmajor graduate credit: Geol 302, 311, 356, 365, 368, 402, 403, 411, 412, 422, 434, 451, 457, 474, 475, 481, Mteor 301, 306, 311, 341, 342, 404, 406, 407, 411, 417, 432, 443, 454, 455, and 475.

Geology (Geol)
Courses Primarily for Undergraduate Students
Geol 100. The Earth. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. How does the earth work, what is it made of, and how does it change through time? Plate tectonics, earth materials, landforms, structures, climate, and natural resources. Emphasis on the observations and hypotheses used to interpret earth system processes. Students may also enroll in Geol 100L.

Geol 100L. The Earth: Laboratory. (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 100. Characterization of rocks and minerals; interpretation of structures and landforms.

Geol 101. Environmental Geology: Earth in Crisis. (Same as Env S 101.) (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. An introduction to geologic processes and the consequences of human activity from local to global scales. Discussion of human population growth, resource depletion, pollution and waste disposal, global warming and ozone depletion, desertification, and geologic hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, flooding, and volcanism.

Geol 102. History of the Earth. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 100 or 201. The earth's physical and biological evolution; concepts of global tectonics. Methods used to decipher earth history. Students majoring in geology must also enroll in Geol 102L.

Geol 102L. History of the Earth: Laboratory. (0-2) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in 102. Introduction to the use of sedimentary rocks and fossils in reconstructing the earth's history.

Geol 108. Introduction to Oceanography. (Same as Env S 108.) (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Introduction to study of the oceans. Ocean exploration. Waves and currents. Shape, structure, and origin of the ocean basins. Sedimentary record of oceanic life. Composition of seawater and its significance for life. Ocean circulation and its influence on climate. Life of the oceans, including coral reefs. Use and misuse of ocean resources. Anthropogenic impacts on the oceanic environment.

Geol 201. Geology for Engineers and Environmental Scientists. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Introduction to Earth materials and processes with emphasis on engineering and environmental applications.

Geol 290. Independent Study. Cr. 2 to 4 each time taken. Prereq: Permission of instructor.

Geol 298. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Geol 100 or 201, 100L, 102, 102L, and permission of the department cooperative education coordinator; sophomore classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing the work period.

Geol 302. Summer Field Studies. Cr. 6 to 8. SS. Prereq: 102, 356, 368. Aerial mapping; structural, stratigraphic, and geomorphologic analyses. Written reports with appropriate illustrations required. A 6-week summer field course required of all geology majors. Students who enroll for the 8 credit option must participate in a two week excursion to selected regions of the western U.S. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 304I. Physical Geology. (Same as Ia LL 304I.) See Iowa Lakeside Laboratory.
Geol 306. Geology Field Trip. Cr. 2 each time taken. F.S. May be taken more than once. Prereq: 100 or 201, permission of instructor. Geology of selected regions studied by correlated readings followed by a field trip to points of geologic interest. Ten-day field trip required.

Geol 311. Mineralogy and Earth Materials. (A: 3-6 or B: 2-6) Cr. 4 or 5. S. Prereq: 100 or 201, Chem 163. Introduction to mineral classification, elementary crystal chemistry, crystal morphology, mineral stability, and associations. Laboratory problems in mineral identification methods, including hand-specimen identification and x-ray diffraction. 311A includes more in-depth treatment of crystallography and optical properties of minerals. 311B emphasizes mineral associations, stability of minerals in the weathering environment, and environmental mineralogy. Students in the traditional geology option and in earth science should enroll in 311A. Students in the environmental geology/hydrogeology option should enroll in 311B.
Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 324. Energy and the Environment. (Same as Env S 324, Mteor 324.) (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Renewable and non-renewable energy resources. Origin, occurrence, and extraction of fossil fuels. Nuclear, wind, and solar energy. Energy efficiency. Environmental effects of energy production, including air pollution, acid precipitation, and global climate change. Does not count toward credits required in the Geology major.

Geol 356. Structural Geology. (3-6) Cr. 5. S. Prereq: 100 or 201; Phys 111 or 221 (preferred), Math 165 or 181. Principles of stress and strain. Brittle and ductile behavior of rocks. Description and classification of joints, faults, folds, fractures, foliation, and lineation. Plate tectonics and regional geology. Laboratory includes application of geometrical techniques to solve structural problems; emphasizes map interpretation and use of stereonet and computer methods. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 365. Petrology. (3-6) Cr. 5. F. Prereq: 311. Nature and origin of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. Emphasis on important rock-forming environments and processes and their influence on rock characteristics. Laboratory includes thin section study of rock textures and mineralogy and the interpretation of these features. Field trips. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 368. Stratigraphy and Sedimentation. (3-2) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: 311. Origin of sedimentary rocks and the characteristics of major depositional systems, geologic time, stratigraphic nomenclature, methods of correlation, facies and facies analysis, sequence stratigraphy, sedimentary tectonics and basin analysis. Required field and laboratory-based problem with a comprehensive written report. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 398. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Geol 100 or 201, 100L, 102, 102L, and permission of the department cooperative education coordinator; junior classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Geol 402. Watershed Hydrology and Surficial Processes. (Same as Agron 402, EnSci 402, For 402.) (3-3) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in EnSci 330 or Geol 100 or 201, Math 165 or 181. Examination of watersheds as systems wherein biological and physical factors control hydrology, soil formation, and nutrient transport. Laboratory emphasizes field investigation of watershed-scale processes. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 403. Environmental Biogeochemistry. (Same as Bot 403, EnSci 403.) (3-2) Cr. 4. S. Prereq: EnSci 330 or permission of instructor. Biological, chemical, and physical phenomena controlling material, energy, and elemental fluxes in the environment. Human interactions with and effects on environmental systems. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 410. Field Methods in Hydrogeology. (Dual-listed with 510.) (0-4) Cr. 2. Alt. SS., offered 2004. Prereq: 411 or C E 473. Introduction to field methods used in groundwater investigations. In-field implementation of pumping tests, slug tests, monitoring well installation and drilling techniques, geochemical and water quality sampling, seepage meters, minipiezometers, stream gaging, electronic instrumentation for data collection, and geophysics. Local field trips to investigate water resource, water quality, and remediation projects.

Geol 411. Hydrogeology. (Dual-listed with 511; same as EnSci 411.) (3-2) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: 100 or 201, Math 165 or 181; Phys 111 or 221. Physical principles of groundwater flow, nature and origin of aquifers and confining units, well hydraulics, and contaminant transport. Lab emphasizes applied field and laboratory methods for hydrogeological investigations. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 412. Paleobiology. (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2004. Prereq: 102. Introduction to the principles, methods of analysis, and major controversies within paleontology. Examination of the fossil record and its application to problems in evolutionary biology, paleoecology, paleoclimatology, and general Earth history. Lab involves observation, analysis, and interpretation of fossil specimens and relevant material of living organisms. Field/lab-based project. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 422. Environmental Geochemistry. (Dual-listed with 522; same as EnSci 422.) (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 402 or 411 or equivalent. Geochemistry of natural waters, including inorganic and organic constituents and water-rock interactions. Interpretation of water quality data. Geochemical equilibrium modeling and introduction to kinetics. Laboratory emphasizes chemical analysis of waters and computer modeling. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 434. Contaminant Hydrogeology. (Dual-listed with 534; same as EnSci 434.) (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 411 or equivalents. Brief review of organic and inorganic contaminants in industrial and agricultural settings. Process-oriented approach to abiotic and biological fate and transport of contaminants. Investigation of coupled processes (diffusion, advection, dispersion, sorption, and biodegradation) using computer models. Groundwater remediation strategies. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 451. Applied and Environmental Geophysics. (Dual-listed with 551.) (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 100 or 201, Math 165 or equivalent experience. Seismic, gravity, magnetic, resistivity, electromagnetic, and ground-penetrating radar techniques for shallow subsurface investigations and imaging. Data interpretation methods. Lab emphasizes computer interpretation packages. Field work with seismic - and resistivity-imaging systems and radar. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 457. Exploration Seismology. (Dual-listed with 557.) (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2004. Prereq: 100 or 201, Math 165 or equivalent experience. Physics of elastic-wave propagation. Seismic surveys in environmental imaging, engineering, and petroleum exploration. Reflection and refraction techniques. Data collection, processing, and geological interpretation. Field work with state-of-the-art equipment. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 474. Glacial and Quaternary Geology. (Dual-listed with 574.) (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2005. Prereq: 100 or 201 or equivalent experience. The study of the depositional and erosional processes of glaciers using modern glacier analogs and landforms. Discussion of glaciology, glacier hydrology, Quaternary history and stratigraphy, paleoclimatology, and causes of glaciation. Laboratory emphasizes aerial photo and topographic map interpretation and the Quaternary stratigraphy of Iowa. Two required field trips. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 475. Surficial Processes. (Dual-listed with 575, same as EnSci 475.) (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 100 or 201 or equivalent experience. Study of surficial processes in modern and ancient geological environments. Topics include weathering, sediment transport, and landform genesis with emphasis on fluvial, glacial, hillslope, eolian, and coastal processes. Applications to engineering and environmental problems. Laboratory emphasizes aerial photo and topographic map interpretation. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 481. Economic Geology and the Environment. (Dual-listed with 581.) (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2003. Prereq: 365. Review of major processes which concentrate economically important materials in the earth. Nature and origin of metallic and non-metallic ore deposits, petroleum, and coal. Environmental effects of the production and use of mineral resources, including discussions of acid-mine drainage. Laboratory emphasizes the study of economic minerals from metallic deposits. Nonmajor graduate credit.

Geol 490. Independent Study. Cr. 2 to 4 each time taken. Prereq: 6 credits in geology and permission of instructor. No more than 9 credits of Geol 490 may be counted toward graduation.

Geol 498. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Geol 100 or 201, 100L, 102, 102L, and permission of the department cooperative education coordinator; senior classification. Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Courses Primarily for Graduate Students, Open to Qualified Undergraduate Students

Geol 506. Geology Field Trip. Cr. 2 each time taken. May be taken more than once. F.S. Prereq: Graduate classification. Geology of selected regions studied by correlated readings, followed by a field trip to points of geologic interest. Ten-day field trip.

Geol 507. Mineral Resources Field Trip. Cr. 1 each time taken. May be taken more than once. F. Prereq: Geol 365. On-site inspection of various coal and ore deposits, mining operations, and mineral processing plants. Offered on a satisfactory-fail grading basis only.

Geol 510. Field Methods in Hydrogeology. (Dual-listed with 410.) (0-4) Cr. 2. Alt. SS., offered 2004. Prereq: 411 or C E 473. Introduction to field methods used in groundwater investigations. In-field implementation of pumping tests, slug tests, monitoring well installation and drilling techniques, geochemical and water quality sampling, seepage meters, minipiezometers, stream gaging, electronic instrumentation for data collection, and geophysics. Local field trips to investigate water resource, water quality, and remediation projects.

Geol 511. Hydrogeology. (Dual-listed with 411.) (3-2) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: 100 or 201, Math 165 or 181; Phys 111 or 221. Physical principles of groundwater flow, nature and origin of aquifers and confining units, well hydraulics, and contaminant transport. Lab emphasizes applied field and laboratory methods for hydrogeological investigations.

Geol 522. Environmental Geochemistry. (Dual-listed with 422.) (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 511 or equivalent. Geochemistry of natural waters, including inorganic and organic constituents and water-rock interactions. Interpretation of water quality data. Geochemical equilibrium modeling and introduction to kinetics. Laboratory emphasizes chemical analysis of waters and computer modeling.

Geol 534. Contaminant Hydrogeology. (Dual-listed with 434.) (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 511 or their equivalent. Brief review of organic and inorganic contaminants in industrial and agricultural settings. Geochemical interactions with porous media. Process-oriented approach to abiotic and biological fate and transport of contaminants. Investigation of coupled processes (diffusion, advection, dispersion, sorption, and biodegradation) using computer models. Groundwater remediation strategies.

Geol 541. Geochemistry and Mineral Chemistry. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2003. Prereq: 311, physical chemistry recommended. Thermodynamics and kinetic methods for interpreting geochemical processes and environments, particularly those at elevated temperature and pressure. Emphasis on crystal chemistry, chemical bonding, phase relations in binary and ternary systems, and hydrothermal systems.

Geol 542. Optical Mineralogy. (1-2) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: 311. Introduction to using the microscope for mineral identification. Optical properties of minerals in immersion oils and in thin section. Research project required.

Geol 550. Advanced Structural Geology. (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2003. Prereq: 356. Principles of stress and strain; folding, faulting, development of schistosity and lineation; deformation mechanisms and flow laws; development and tectonic implications of crystallographic preferred orientations. Lab includes descriptive geometry, use of the stereonet, and computer applications.

Geol 551. Applied and Environmental Geophysics. (Dual-listed with 451.) (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 100 or 201, Math 165 or equivalent experience. Seismic, gravity, magnetic, resistivity, electromagnetic, and ground-penetrating radar techniques for shallow subsurface investigations and imaging. Data interpretation methods. Lab emphasizes computer interpretation packages. Field work with seismic-and resistivity-imaging systems and radar.

Geol 555. Soil Clay Mineralogy. (Same as Agron 555.) See Agronomy.

Geol 555L. Soil Clay Mineralogy Laboratory. (Same as Agron 555L.) See Agronomy.

Geol 557. Exploration Seismology. (Dual-listed with 457.) (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2004. Prereq: 100 or 201, Math 165 or equivalent experience. Seismic surveys in environmental imaging, engineering, and petroleum exploration. Reflection and refraction techniques. Data collection, processing, and geological interpretation. Field work with state-of-the-art equipment.

Geol 562. Advanced Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology. (3-3) Cr. 4. Alt. F., offered 2004. Prereq: 365. Origin and evolution of crystalline rocks. Nature of crustal and mantle magma source regions; chemical and physical changes accompanying crystallization; heterogeneous phase equilibria; mineral assemblages and textures of contact, dynamic, and regionally metamorphosed rocks; processes of recrystallization and deformation; regional patterns of metamorphic belts. Laboratory involves microscopic examination of crystalline rocks in thin section and computer applications.

Geol 571. Principles of Stratigraphy. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2003. Prereq: 412. Study of basic concepts of stratigraphy. Stratigraphic processes and interpretation, sedimentation and tectonics, sequence stratigraphy, basin analysis, and relations between stratigraphy and fluid flow. Aspects of field and seismic data observation and interpretation.

Geol 574. Glacial and Quaternary Geology. (Dual-listed with 474.) (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2005. Prereq: 100 or 201. The study of the depositional and erosional processes of glaciers using modern glacier analogs and landforms. Discussion of glaciology, glacier hydrology, Quaternary history and stratigraphy, paleoclimatology, and causes of glaciation. Laboratory emphasizes aerial photo and topographic map interpretation and the Quaternary stratigraphy of Iowa. Two required field trips.

Geol 575. Surficial Processes. (Dual-listed with 475.) (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 100 or 201 or equivalent experience. Study of surficial processes in modern and ancient geological environments. Topics include weathering, sediment transport, and landform genesis with emphasis on fluvial, glacial, hillslope, eolian, and coastal processes. Applications to engineering and environmental problems. Laboratory emphasizes aerial photo and topographic map interpretation.

Geol 576. Advanced Sedimentation. (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered 2004. Prereq: 368, 571. Study of the processes and products of sedimentation. Modern and ancient sedimentary systems. Study of facies models for carbonate, siliciclastic and evaporite systems. Field trips.

Geol 581. Economic Geology and the Environment. (Dual-listed with 481.) (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2003. Prereq: 365. Review of major processes which concentrate economically important materials in the earth. Nature and origin of metallic and non-metallic ore deposits, petroleum, and coal. Environmental effects of the production and use of mineral resources, including discussions of acid-mine drainage. Laboratory emphasizes the study of economic minerals from metallic deposits.

Geol 590. Special Topics. Cr. 1 to 3 each time taken. Prereq: Permission of instructor.
A. Surficial Processes
B. Stratigraphy
C. Sedimentation
D. Paleontology
E. Petrology
F. Structural Geology
G. Geochemistry
H. Hydrogeology
I. Earth Science
J. Mineral Resources
K. Geophysics
L. Mineralogy
M. Tectonics
N. Paleoecology and Paleoclimatology
O. Isotope Geochemistry

Geol 595. Graduate Seminar. Cr. R. F.S. Prereq: Senior or graduate classification. Weekly seminar on topics of current research interest. All students seeking a graduate degree in geology must enroll during each semester of residence. Students pursuing a non-thesis option for the M.S. in Earth Science must enroll for one semester.

Geol 599. Creative Component. Cr. var.

Courses for Graduate Students
Geol 610. Advanced Seminar. Cr. 1 to 3 each time taken. F.S. Prereq: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.
A. Earth Materials
B. Economic Geology
C. Environmental Geochemistry
D. Geophysics
E. Geotectonics
F. Hydrogeology
G. Surficial Processes
H. Sedimentation and Stratigraphy
I. Paleoecology and Paleoclimatology
J. Isotope Geochemistry
Geol 699. Research. Cr. var.
A. Surficial Processes
B. Stratigraphy
C. Sedimentation
D. Paleontology
E. Petrology
F. Structural Geology
G. Geochemistry
H. Hydrogeology
I. Earth Science
J. Mineral Resources
K. Geophysics
L. Mineralogy
M. Tectonics
N. Paleoecology and Paleoclimatology
O. Isotope Geochemistry

 
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