Sponsors

Leopold Center
U.S. Department of Agriculture

 

 

Insects wear their skeletons on the outside (exoskeletons). In order to grow, immature (larval) insects must periodically shed their old exoskeleton.

Prior to shedding their old exoskeleton, a process called molting, a new exoskeleton must be formed. Larval molts accommodate growth. The changes from larval characteristics to the adult form (a process called metamorphosis) also take place during molting.

Molting and metamorphosis are processes that are regulated by several types of hormones called insect growth regulators. Some types of insect growth regulators have been synthesized and developed for insect control purposes.

 

Implementing Insect Growth Regulators

The listed insecticides should only be used as supplements to pheromone treatments because they are NOT applied at the time pheromone dispensers are applied.

  1. Tebufenozide (Confirm): First generation timing of tebufenozide or methoxyfenozide is at 250 degree days after biofix and repeated every 14 to 21 days.
  2. Methoxyfenozide (Intrepid): First generation timing of tebufenozide or methoxyfenozide is at 250 degree days after biofix and repeated every 14 to 21 days.
  3. Horticultural mineral oil: First generation timing for horticultural mineral oil (1% solution) is at 200 degree days after biofix (first moth catch) and repeated every 14 days.

 
Email: mgleason@iastate.edu Telephone: (515) 294 0579 Address: 312 Bessey Hall, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011