_____________________________________________________________________________

This preformatted version of the National Trails System Act of 1968,
as amended, is being provided to you by the Nez Perce National Historic
Trail Foundation.
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                      THE NATIONAL TRAILS SYSTEM ACT

                               (P.L. 90-543)
                         (16 U.S.C. 1241 et. seq.)
            as amended through P.L. 103-145, November 17, 1993
 

                                  AN ACT

To establish a national trails system, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States
of America in Congress assembled,
 
                            SEC 1.  SHORT TITLE

 This Act may be cited as the "National Trails System Act".
 

                        SEC 2.  STATEMENT OF POLICY

(a) In order to provide for the ever-increasing outdoor recreation needs of an
expanding population and in order to promote the preservation of, public
access to, travel within, and enjoyment and appreciation of the open-air,
outdoor areas and historic resources of the Nation, trails should be
established (i) primarily, near the urban areas of the Nation, and (ii)
secondarily, within scenic areas and along historic travel routes of the
Nation which are often more remotely located.

(b) The purpose of this Act is to provide the means for attaining these
objectives by instituting a national system of recreation, scenic and historic
trails, by designating the Appalachian Trail and the Pacific Crest Trail as
the initial components of that system, and by prescribing the methods by
which, and standards according to which, additional components may be added to
the system.

(c) The Congress recognizes the valuable contributions that volunteers and
private, nonprofit trail groups have made to the development and maintenance
of the Nation's trails.  In recognition of these contributions, it is further
the purpose of this Act to encourage and assist volunteer citizen involvement
in the planning, development, maintenance, and management, where appropriate,
of trails.


                      SEC 3.  NATIONAL TRAILS SYSTEM

(a) The national system of trails shall be composed of the following:  

  (l) National recreation trails, established as provided in section 4 of
this Act, which will provide a variety of outdoor recreation uses in or
reasonably accessible to urban areas.

  (2) National scenic trails, established as provided in section 5 of this
Act, which will be extended trails so located as to provide for maximum
outdoor recreation potential and for the conservation and enjoyment of the
nationally significant scenic, historic, natural, or cultural qualities of the
areas through which such trails may pass.  National scenic trails may be
located so as to represent desert, marsh, grassland, mountain, canyon, river,
forest, and other areas, as well as landforms which exhibit significant
characteristics of the physiographic regions of the Nation.

  (3) National historic trails, established as provided in section 5 of this
Act, which will be extended trails which follow as closely as possible and
practicable the original trails or routes of travel of national historic
significance.  Designation of such trails or routes shall be continuous, but
the established or developed trail, and the acquisition thereof, need not be
continuous onsite.  National historic trails shall have as their purpose the
identification and protection of the historic route and its historic remnants
and artifacts for public use and enjoyment. Only those selected land and water
based components of a historic trail which are on federally owned lands and
which meet the national historic trail criteria established in this Act are
included as Federal protection components of a national historic trail.  The
appropriate Secretary may certify other lands as protected segments of an
historic trail upon application from State or local governmental agencies or
private interests involved if such segments meet the national historic trail
criteria established in this Act and such criteria supplementary thereto as
the appropriate Secretary may prescribe, and are administered by such agencies
or interests without expense to the United States. 

  (4) Connecting or side trails, established as provided in section 6 of this
Act, which will provide additional points of public access to national
recreation, national scenic or national historic trails or which will provide
connections between such trails.

  The Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture, in
consultation with appropriate governmental agencies and public and private
organizations, shall establish a uniform marker for the national trails
system.

(b) For purposes of this section, the term 'extended trails' means trails or
trail segments which total at least one hundred miles in length, except that
historic trails of less than one hundred miles may be designated as extended
trails.  While it is desirable that extended trails be continuous, studies of
such trails may conclude that it is feasible to propose one or more trail
segments which, in the aggregate, constitute at least one hundred miles in
length.

(c) On October l, l982, and at the beginning of each odd numbered fiscal year
thereafter, the Secretary of the Interior shall submit to the Speaker of the
United States House of Representatives and to the President of the United
States Senate, an initial and revised (respectively) National Trails System
plan.  Such comprehensive plan shall indicate the scope and extent of a
completed nationwide system of trails, to include (l) desirable nationally
significant scenic and historic components which are considered necessary to
complete a comprehensive national system, and (2) other trails which would
balance out a complete and comprehensive nationwide system of trails.  Such
plan, and the periodic revisions thereto, shall be prepared in full
consultation with the Secretary of Agriculture, the Governors of the various
States, and the trails community.


                    SEC 4.  NATIONAL RECREATION TRAILS

(a) The Secretary of the Interior, or the Secretary of Agriculture where lands
administered by him are involved, may establish and designate national
recreation trails, with the consent of the Federal agency, State, or political
subdivision having jurisdiction over the lands involved, upon finding that--

  (i) such trails are reasonably accessible to urban areas, and, or

  (ii) such trails meet the criteria established in this Act and such
supplementary criteria as he may  prescribe.

(b) As provided in this section, trails within park, forest, and other
recreation areas administered by the Secretary of the Interior or the
Secretary of Agriculture or in other federally administered areas may be
established and designated as "National Recreation Trails" by the appropriate
Secretary and, when no Federal land acquisition is involved --

  (i) trails in or reasonably accessible to urban areas may be designated as
"National Recreation Trails" by the appropriate Secretary with the consent of
the States, their political subdivisions, or other appropriate administering
agencies;

  (ii) trails within park, forest, and other recreation areas owned or
administered by States may be designated as "National Recreation Trails" by
the appropriate Secretary with the consent of the State; and 

  (iii) trails on privately owned lands may be designated 'National
Recreation Trails' by the appropriate Secretary with the written consent of
the owner of the property involved.


           SEC. 5  NATIONAL SCENIC AND NATIONAL HISTORIC TRAILS

(a) National scenic and national historic trails shall be authorized and
designated only by Act of Congress.  There are hereby established the
following National Scenic and National Historic Trails:

  (1) The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, a trail of approximately two
thousand miles extending generally along the Appalachian Mountains from Mount
Katahdin, Maine, to Springer Mountain, Georgia.  Insofar as practicable, the
right-of-way for such trail shall comprise the trail depicted on the maps
identified as "Nationwide System of Trails, Proposed Appalachian Trail,
NST-AT-101-May 1967", which shall be on file and available for public
inspection in the office of the Director of the National Park Service.  Where
practicable, such rights-of-way shall include lands protected for it under
agreements in effect as of the date of enactment of this Act, to which Federal
agencies and States were parties.  The Appalachian Trail shall be administered
primarily as a footpath by the Secretary of the Interior, in consultation with
the Secretary of Agriculture.

  (2) The Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail, a trail of approximately two
thousand three hundred fifty miles, extending from the Mexican-California
border northward generally along the mountain ranges of the west coast States
to the Canadian-Washington border near Lake Ross, following the route as
generally depicted on the map, identified as "Nationwide System of Trails,
Proposed Pacific Crest Trail, NST-PC-103-May 1967" which shall be on file and
available for public inspection in the office of the Chief of the Forest
Service.  The Pacific Crest Trail shall be administered by the Secretary of
Agriculture, in consultation with the Secretary of the Interior.

  (3) The Oregon National Historic Trail, a route of approximately two
thousand miles extending from near Independence, Missouri, to the vicinity of
Portland, Oregon, following a route as depicted on maps identified as 'Primary
Route of the Oregon Trail 1841-1848', in the Department of the Interior's
Oregon Trail study report dated April 1977, and which shall be on file and
available for public inspection in the office of the Director of the National
Park Service.  The trail shall be administered by the Secretary of the
Interior.

  (4) The Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail, a route of approximately
one thousand three hundred miles extending from Nauvoo, Illinois, to Salt Lake
City, Utah, following the primary historical route of the Mormon Trail as
generally depicted on a map, identified as, 'Mormon Trail Vicinity Map, figure
2' in the Department of the Interior Mormon Trail study report dated March
1977, and which shall be on file and available for public inspection in the
office of the Director, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.  The trail
shall be administered by the Secretary of the Interior.

  (5) The Continental Divide National Scenic Trail, a trail of approximately
thirty-one hundred miles, extending from the Montana-Canada border to the New
Mexico-Mexico border, following the approximate route depicted on the map,
identified as 'Proposed Continental Divide National Scenic Trail' in the
Department of the Interior Continental Divide Trail study report dated March
1977 and which shall be on file and available for public inspection in the
office of the Chief, Forest Service, Washington, D.C.  The Continental Divide
National Scenic Trail shall be administered by the Secretary of Agriculture in
consultation with the Secretary of the Interior.  Notwithstanding the
provisions of section 7(c), the use of motorized vehicles on roads which will
be designated segments of the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail shall
be permitted in accordance with regulations prescribed by the appropriate
Secretary.

  (6) The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, a trail of approximately
three thousand seven hundred miles, extending from Wood River, Illinois, to
the mouth of the Columbia River in Oregon, following the outbound and inbound
routes of the Lewis and Clark Expedition depicted on maps identified as,
'Vicinity Map, Lewis and Clark Trail' study report dated April 1977.  The map
shall be on file and available for public inspection in the office of the
Director, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.  The trail shall be
administered by the Secretary of the Interior.

  (7) The Iditarod National Historic Trail, a route of approximately two
thousand miles extending from Seward, Alaska, to Nome, Alaska, following the
routes as depicted on maps identified as 'Seward-Nome Trail', in the
Department of the Interior's study report entitled 'The Iditarod Trail
(Seward-Nome Route) and other Alaskan Gold Rush Trails' dated September 1977. 
The map shall be on file and available for public inspection in the office of
the Director, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.  The trail shall be
administered by the Secretary of the Interior.

  (8) The North Country National Scenic Trail, a trail of approximately
thirty-two hundred miles, extending from eastern New York State to the
vicinity of Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota, following the approximate route
depicted on the map identified as 'Proposed North Country Trail-Vicinity Map'
in the Department of the Interior 'North Country Trail Report', dated June
1975.  The map shall be on file and available for public inspection in the
office of the Director, National Park Service, Washington, District of
Columbia.  The trail shall be administered by the Secretary of the Interior.

  (9) The Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail, a system totaling
approximately two hundred seventy-two miles of trail with routes from the
mustering point near Abingdon, Virginia, to Sycamore Shoals (near
Elizabethton, Tennessee); from Sycamore Shoals to Quaker Meadows (near
Morganton, North Carolina); from the mustering point in Surry County, North
Carolina, to Quaker Meadows; and from Quaker Meadows to Kings Mountain, South
Carolina, as depicted on the map identified as Map 3--Historic Features--1780
in the draft study re- port entitled 'Overmountain Victory Trail' dated
December 1979.  The map shall be on file and available for public inspection
in the Office of the Director, National Park Service, Washington, District of
Columbia.  The trail shall be administered by the Secretary of the Interior.

  (10) The Ice Age National Scenic Trail, a trail of approximately one
thousand miles, extending from Door County, Wisconsin, to Interstate Park in
Saint Croix County, Wisconsin, generally following the route described in "On
the Trail of the Ice Age--A Hiker's and Biker's Guide to Wisconsin's Ice Age
National Scientific Reserve and Trail", by Henry S. Reuss, Member of Congress,
dated 1980.  The guide and maps shall be on file and available for public
inspection in the Office of the Director, National Park Service, Washington,
District of Columbia.  Overall administration of the trail shall be the
responsibility of the Secretary of the Interior pursuant to section 5(d) of
this Act.  The State of Wisconsin, in consultation with the Secretary of the
Interior, may, subject to the approval of the Secretary, prepare a plan for
the management of the trail which shall be deemed to meet the requirements of
section 5(e) of this Act.  Notwithstanding the provisions of section 7(c),
snowmobile use may be permitted on segments of the Ice Age National Scenic
Trail where deemed appropriate by the Secretary and the managing authority
responsible for the segment.

  (11) The Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail, a corridor of
approximately seven hundred and four miles following the route as generally
depicted on the map identified as 'National Trails System, Proposed Potomac
Heritage Trail' in 'The Potomac Heritage Trail', a report prepared by the
Department of the Interior and dated December 1974, except that no designation
of the trail shall be made in the State of West Virginia.  The map shall be on
file and available for public inspection in the office of the Director of the
National Park Service, Washington, District of Columbia.  The trail shall
initially consist of only those segments of the corridor located within the
exterior boundaries of federally administered areas.  No lands or interests
therein outside the exterior boundaries of any federally administered area may
be acquired by the Federal Government for the Potomac Heritage Trail.  The
Secretary of the Interior may designate lands outside of federally
administered areas as segments of the trail, only upon application from the
States or local governmental agencies involved, if such segments meet the
criteria established in this Act and are administered by such agencies without
expense to the United States.  The trail shall be administered by the
Secretary of the Interior.

  (12) The Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail, a trail system of
approximately six hundred and ninety-four miles extending from Nashville,
Tennessee, to Natchez, Mississippi, as depicted on the map entitled 'Concept
Plan, Natchez Trace Trails Study' in 'The Natchez Trace', a report prepared by
the Department of the Interior and dated August 1979.  The map shall be on
file and available for public inspection in the office of the Director of the
National Park Service, Department of the Interior, Washington, District of
Columbia.  The trail shall be administered by the Secretary of the Interior.

  (13) The Florida National Scenic Trail, a route of approximately thirteen
hundred miles extending through the State of Florida as generally depicted in
'The Florida Trail', a national scenic trail study draft report prepared by
the Department of the Interior and dated February 1980.  The report shall be
on file and available for public inspection in the office of the Chief of the
Forest Service, Washington, District of Columbia.  No lands or interests
therein outside the exterior boundaries of any federally administered area may
be acquired by the Federal Government for the Florida Trail except with the
consent of the owner thereof.  The Secretary of Agriculture may designate
lands outside of federally administered areas as segments of the trail, only
upon application from the States or local governmental agencies involved, if
such segments meet the criteria established in this Act and are administered
by such agencies without expense to the United States.  The trail shall be
administered by the Secretary of Agriculture.

  (14) The Nez Perce National Historic Trail, a route of approximately eleven
hundred and seventy miles extending from the vicinity of Wallowa Lake, Oregon,
to Bear Paw Mountain, Montana, as generally depicted in 'Nez Perce
(Nee-Me-Poo) Trail Study Report' prepared by the Department of Agriculture and
dated March l982.  The report shall be on file and available for public
inspection in the Office of the Chief of the Forest Service, Washington,
District of Columbia.  The trail shall be administered by the Secretary of
Agriculture.  No lands or interests therein outside the exterior boundaries of
any federally administered area may be acquired by the Federal Government for
the Nez Perce National Historic Trail.  The Secretary of Agriculture may
designate lands outside of federally administered areas as segments of the
trail upon application from the States or local governmental agencies involved
if such segments meet the criteria established in this Act and are
administered by such agencies without expense to the United States.  So that
significant route segments and sites recognized as associated with the Nez
Perce Trail may be distinguished by suitable markers, the Secretary of
Agriculture is authorized to accept the donation of suitable markers for
placement at appropriate locations.  Any such markers associated with the Nez
Perce Trail which are to be located on lands administered by any other
department or agency of the United States may be placed on such lands only
with the concurrence of the head of such department or agency.

  (15) The Santa Fe National Historic Trail, a trail of approximately 950
miles from a point near Old Franklin, Missouri, through Kansas, Oklahoma, and
Colorado to Santa Fe, New Mexico, as generally depicted on a map entitled "The
Santa Fe Trail" contained in the Final Report of the Secretary of the Interior
pursuant to subsection (b) of this section, dated July 1976.  The map shall be
on file and available for public inspection in the office of the Director of
the National Park Service, Washington, District of Columbia.  The trail shall
be administered by the Secretary of the Interior.  No lands or interests
therein outside the exterior boundaries of any federally administered area may
be acquired by the Federal Government for the Santa Fe Trail except with the
consent of the owner thereof.  Before acquiring any easement or entering into
any cooperative agreement with a private landowner with respect to the trail,
the Secretary shall notify the landowner of the potential liability, if any,
for injury to the public resulting from physical conditions which may be on
the landowner's land.  The United States shall not be held liable by reason of
such notice or failure to provide such notice to the landowner.  So that
significant route segments and sites recognized as associated with the Santa
Fe Trail may be distinguished by suitable markers, the Secretary of the
Interior is authorized to accept the donation of suitable markers for
placement at appropriate locations.

  (16)(A) The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail, a trail consisting of
water routes and overland routes traveled by the Cherokee Nation during its
removal from ancestral lands in the East to Oklahoma during 1838 and 1839,
generally located within the corridor described through portions of Georgia,
North Carolina, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri, Arkansas,
and Oklahoma in the final report of the Secretary of the Interior prepared
pursuant to subsection (b) of this section entitled "Trail of Tears" and dated
June 1986.  Maps depicting the corridor shall be on file and available for
public inspection in the Office of the National Park Service, Department of
the Interior.  The trail shall be administered by the Secretary of the
Interior.  No lands or interests therein outside the exterior boundariesof any federally administered area may be acquired by the Federal Government
for the Trail of Tears except with the consent of the owner thereof.

    (B) In carrying out his responsibilities pursuant to subsections 5(f) and
  7(c) of this Act, the Secretary of the Interior shall give careful
  consideration to the establishment of appropriate interpretive sites for
  the Trail of Tears in the vicinity of Hopkinsville, Kentucky, Fort Smith,
  Arkansas, Trail of Tears State Park, Missouri, and Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

  (17) The Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail, a trail comprising
the overland route traveled by Captain Juan Bautista de Anza of Spain during
the years 1775 and 1776 from Sonora, Mexico, to the vicinity of San Francisco,
California, as generally described in the report of the Department of Interior
prepared pursuant to the subsection (b) entitled 'Juan Bautista de Anza
National Trail Study, Feasibility Study and Environmental Assessment' and
dated August, 1986.  A map generally depicting the trail shall be on file and
available for public inspection in the Office of the Director of the National
Park Service, Washington, District of Columbia.  The trail shall be
administered by the Secretary of Interior.  No lands or interest therein
outside the exterior boundaries of any federally administered area may be
acquired by the Federal Government for the Juan Bautista de Anza National
Historic Trail without the consent of the owner thereof.  In implementing this
paragraph, the Secretary shall encourage volunteer trail groups to participate
in the development and maintenance of the trail.

  (18) The California National Historic Trail, a route of approximately five
thousand seven hundred miles, including all routes and cutoffs, extending from
Independence and Saint Joseph, Missouri, and Council Bluffs, Iowa, to various
points in California and Oregon, as generally described in the report of the
Department of the Interior prepared pursuant to subsection (b) of this section
entitled "California and Pony Express Trails, Eligibility/Feasibility
Study/Environmental Assessment" and dated September 1987.  A map generally
depicting the route shall be on file and available for public inspection in
the Office of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.  The
trail shall be administered by the Secretary of the Interior.  No lands or
interests therein outside the exterior boundaries of any federally
administered area may be acquired by the United States for the California
National Historic Trail except with the consent of the owner thereof.

  (19) (a) The Pony Express National Historic Trail, a route of approximately
one thousand nine hundred miles, including the original route and subsequent
route changes, extending from Saint Joseph, Missouri, to Sacramento,
California, as generally described in the report of the Department of the
Interior prepared pursuant to subsection (b) of this section entitled
"California and Pony Express Trails, Eligibility/Feasibility
Study/Environmental Assessment" and dated September 1987.  A map generally
depicting the route shall be on file and available for public inspection in
the Office of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.  The
trail shall be administered by the Secretary of the Interior.  No lands or
interests therein outside the exterior boundaries of any federally
administered area may be acquired by the United States for the Pony Express
National Historic Trail except with the consent of the owner thereof.

  [Related language from section 2, P.L. 102-328:  The Secretary of the
Interior (hereinafter referred to as the Secretary) shall undertake a study of
the land and water route used to carry mail from Sacramento to San Francisco,
California, to determine the feasibility and suitability of designation of
such route as a component of the Pony Express National Historic Trail
designated by section 1 of this Act.  Upon completion of the study, if the
Secretary determines such a route is a feasible and suitable addition to the
Pony Express National Historic Trail, the Secretary shall designate the route
as a component of the Pony Express National Historic Trail.  The Secretary
shall publish notice of such designation in the Federal Register and shall
submit the study along with his findings to the Committee on Interior and
Insular Affairs of the United States House of Representatives and the
Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the United States Senate.]

(b) The Secretary of the Interior, through the agency most likely to
administer such trail, and the Secretary of Agriculture where lands
administered by him are involved, shall make such additional studies as are
herein or may hereafter be authorized by the Congress for the purpose of
determining the feasibility and desirability of designating other trails as
national scenic or national historic trails.  Such studies shall be made in
consultation with the heads of other Federal agencies administering lands
through which such additional proposed trails would pass and in cooperation
with interested interstate, State, and local governmental agencies, public and
private organizations, and landowners and land users concerned.  The
feasibility of designating a trail shall be determined on the basis of an
evaluation of whether or not it is physically possible to develop a trail
along a route being studied, and whether the development of a trail would be
financially feasible.  The studies listed in subsection (c) of this section
shall be completed and submitted to the Congress, with recommendations as to
the suitability of trail designation, not later than three complete fiscal
years from the date of enactment of their addition to this subsection, or from
the date of enactment of this sentence, whichever is later.  Such studies,
when submitted, shall be printed as a House or Senate document, and shall
include, but not be limited to:

    (1) the proposed route of such trail (including maps and illustrations);

    (2) the areas adjacent to such trails, to be utilized for scenic,
    historic, natural, cultural, or developmental purposes;

    (3) the characteristics which, in the judgment of the appropriate
    Secretary, make the proposed trail worthy of designation as a national
    scenic or national historic trail; and in the case of national historic
    trails the report shall include the recommendation of the Secretary of
    the Interior's National Park System Advisory Board as to the national
    historic significance based on the criteria developed under the Historic
    Sites Act of 1935 (40 Stat. 666; 16 U.S.C. 461);

    (4) the current status of land ownership and current and potential use
    along the designated route;

    (5) the estimated cost of acquisition of lands or interest in lands, if
    any;

    (6) the plans for developing and maintaining the trail and the cost
    thereof;

    (7) the proposed Federal administering agency (which, in the case of a
    national scenic trail wholly or substantially within a national forest,
    shall be the Department of Agriculture);

    (8) the extent to which a State or its political subdivisions and public
    and private organizations might reasonably be expected to participate in
    acquiring the necessary lands and in the administration thereof;

    (9) the relative uses of the lands involved, including:  the number of
    anticipated visitor-days for the entire length of, as well as for
    segments of, such trail; the number of months which such trail, or
    segments thereof, will be open for recreation purposes; the economic and
    social benefits which might accrue from alternate land uses; and the
    estimated man-years of civilian employment and expenditures expected for
    the purposes of maintenance, supervision, and regulation of such trail;

    (10) the anticipated impact of public outdoor recreation use on the
    preservation of a proposed  national historic trail and its related
    historic and archeological features and settings, including the measures
    proposed to ensure evaluation and preservation of the values that
    contribute to their national historic significance; and

    (11) To qualify for designation as a national historic trail, a trail
    must meet all three of the following criteria:

      (A) It must be a trail or route established by historic use and must
      be historically significant as a result of that use.  The route need
      not currently exist as a discernible trail to qualify, but its
      location must be sufficiently known to permit evaluation of public
      recreation and historical interest potential.

      A designated trail should generally accurately follow the historic
      route, but may deviate somewhat on occasion of necessity to avoid
      difficult routing through subsequent development, or to provide some
      route variations offering a more pleasurable recreational experience. 
      Such deviations shall be so noted on site.  Trail segments no longer
      possible to travel by trail due to subsequent development as motorized
      transportation routes may be designated and marked onsite as segments
      which link to the historic trail.

      (B) It must be of national significance with respect to any of several
      broad facets of American history, such as trade and commerce,
      exploration, migration and settlement, or military campaigns.  To
      qualify as nationally significant, historic use of the trail must have
      had a far reaching effect on broad patterns of American culture. 
      Trails significant in the history of native Americans may be included.

      (C) It must have significant potential for public recreational use or
      historical interest based on historic interpretation and appreciation. 
      The potential for such use is generally greater along roadless
      segments developed as historic trails and at historic sites associated
      with the trail.  The presence of recreation potential not related to
      historic appreciation is not sufficient justification for designation
      under this category.

(c) The following routes shall be studied in accordance with the objectives
outlined in subsection (b) of this section.

  (1) Continental Divide Trail, a three-thousand-one-hundred-mile trail
extending from near the Mexican border in southwestern New Mexico northward
generally along the Continental Divide to the Canadian border in Glacier
National Park.

  (2) Potomac Heritage Trail, an eight-hundred-and-twenty-five-mile trail
extending generally from the mouth of the Potomac River to its sources in
Pennsylvania and West Virginia including the one-hundred- and- seventy-mile
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal towpath.

  (3) Old Cattle Trails of the Southwest from the vicinity of San Antonio,
Texas, approximately eight hundred miles through Oklahoma via Baxter Springs
and Chetopa, Kansas, to Fort Scott, Kansas, including the Chisholm Trail, from
the vicinity of San Antonio or Cuero, Texas, approximately eight hundred miles
north through Oklahoma to Abilene, Kansas.

  (4) Lewis and Clark Trail, from Wood River, Illinois, to the Pacific Ocean
in Oregon, following both the outbound and inbound routes of the Lewis and
Clark Expedition.

  (5) Natchez Trace, from Nashville, Tennessee, approximately six hundred
miles to Natchez, Mississippi.

  (6) North Country Trail, from the Appalachian Trail in Vermont,
approximately three thousand two hundred miles through the States of New York,
Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota, to the Lewis and Clark
Trail in North Dakota.

  (7) Kittanning Trail from Shirleysburg in Huntingdon County to Kittanning,
Armstrong County, Pennsylvania.

  (8) Oregon Trail, from Independence, Missouri, approximately two thousand
miles to near Fort Vancouver, Washington.

  (9) Santa Fe Trail, from Independence, Missouri, approximately eight
hundred miles to Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  (10) Long Trail extending two hundred and fifty-five miles from the
Massachusetts border northward through Vermont to the Canadian border.

  (11) Mormon Trail, extending from Nauvoo, Illinois, to Salt Lake City,
Utah, through the States of Iowa, Nebraska, and Wyoming.

  (12) Gold Rush Trails in Alaska.

  (13) Mormon Battalion Trail, extending two thousand miles from Mount
Pisgah, Iowa, through Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona to Los
Angeles, California.

  (14) El Camino Real from St. Augustine to San Mateo, Florida, approximately
20 miles along the southern boundary of the St. Johns River from Fort Caroline
National Memorial to the St. August National Park Monument.

  (15) Bartram Trail, extending through the States of Georgia, North
Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and
Tennessee.

  (16) Daniel Boone Trail, extending from the vicinity of Statesville, North
Carolina, to Fort Boonesborough State Park, Kentucky.

  (17) Desert Trail, extending from the Canadian border through parts of
Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, California, and Arizona, to the Mexican
border.

  (18) Dominguez-Escalante Trail, extending approximately two thousand miles
along the route of the 1776 expedition led by Father Francisco Atanasio
Dominguez and Father Silvestre Velez de Escalante, originating in Santa Fe,
New Mexico; proceeding northwest along the San Juan, Dolores, Gunnison, and
White Rivers in Colorado, thence westerly to Utah Lake; thence southward to
Arizona and returning to Santa Fe.

  (19) Florida Trail, extending north from Everglade National Park, including
the Big Cypress Swamp, the Kissimmee Prairie, the Withlacoochee State Forest,
Ocala  National Forest, Osceola National Forest, and Black Water River State
Forest, said completed trail to be approximately one thousand three hundred
miles along, of which over four hundred miles of trail have already been
built.

  (20) Indian Nations Trail, extending from the Red River in Oklahoma
approximately two hundred miles northward through the former Indian nations to
the Oklahoma-Kansas boundary line.

  (21) Nez Perce Trail extending from the vicinity of Wallowa Lake, Oregon,
to Bear Paw Mountain, Montana.

  (22) Pacific Northwest Trail, extending approximately one thousand miles
from the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park, Montana, to the Pacific
Ocean beach of Olympic National Park, Washington, by way of --

    (A) Flathead National Forest and Kootenai National Forest in the State of
    Montana;

    (B) Kaniksu National Forest in the State of Idaho; and

    (C) Colville National Forest, Okanogan National Forest, Pasayten
    Wilderness Area, Ross Lake National Recreation Area, North Cascades
    National Park, Mount Baker, the Skagit River, Deception Pass, Whidbey
    Island, Olympic National Forest, and Olympic National Park in the State
    of Washington.

  (23) Overmountain Victory Trail, extending from the vicinity of
Elizabethton, Tennessee, to Kings Mountain National Military Park, South
Carolina.

  (24) Juan Bautista de Anza Trail, following the overland route taken by
Juan Bautista de Anza in connection with his travels from the United Mexican
States to San Francisco, California.

  (25) Trail of Tears, including the associated forts and specifically, Fort
Mitchell, Alabama, and historic properties, extending from the vicinity of
Murphy, North Carolina, through Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky,
Illinois, Missouri, and Arkansas, to the vicinity of Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

  (26) Illinois Trail, extending from the Lewis and Clark Trail at Wood
River, Illinois to the Chicago       Portage National Historic Site, generally
following the Illinois River and the Illinois and Michigan Canal.

  (27) Jedediah Smith Trail, to include the routes of the explorations led by
Jedediah Smith -- 

    (A) during the period 1826-1827, extending from the Idaho-Wyoming 
    border, through the Great Salt Lake, Sevier, Virgin, and Colorado River
    Valleys, and the Mojave Desert, to the San Gabriel Mission, California;
    thence through the Tehachapi Mountains, San Joaquin and Stanislaus River
    Valleys, Ebbetts Pass, Walker River Valley, Bald Mount, Mount Grafton,
    and Great Salt Lake to Bear Lake, Utah; and

    (B) during 1828, extending from the Sacramento and Trinity River valleys
    along the Pacific coastline, through the Smith and Willamette River
    Valleys to the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Washington, on the
    Columbia River.

  (28) General Crook Trail, extending from Prescott, Arizona, across the
Mogollon Rim to Fort Apache.

  (29) Beale Wagon Road, within the Kaibab and Cononino National Forests in
Arizona; Provided, such study may be prepared in conjunction with ongoing
planning processes for these National Forests to be completed before 1990.

  (30) Pony Express Trail, extending from Saint Joseph, Missouri, through
Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, to Sacramento, California,
as indicated on a map labeled "Potential Pony Express Trail", dated October
1983 and the California Trail extending from the vicinity of Omaha, Nebraska,
and Saint Joseph, Missouri, to various points in California, as indicated on a
map labeled "Potential California Trail" and dated August 1, 1983. 
Notwithstanding subsection (b) of this section, the study under this paragraph
shall be completed and submitted to the Congress no later than the end of two
complete fiscal years beginning after the date of the enactment of this
paragraph.  Such study shall be separated into two portions, one relating to
the Pony Express Trail and one relating to the California Trail.

  (31) De Soto Trail, the approximate route taken by the expedition of the
Spanish explorer Hernado de Soto in l539, extending through portions of the
States of Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee,
Alabama, Mississippi, to the area of Little Rock, Arkansas, on to Texas and
Louisiana, and any other States which may have been crossed by the expedition.

The study under this paragraph shall be prepared in accordance with subsection
(b) of this section, except that it shall be completed and submitted to the
Congress with  recommendations as to the trail's suitability for designation
not later than one calendar year after the date of enactment of this
paragraph. 

  (32) Coronado Trail, the approximate route taken by the expedition of the
Spanish    explorer Francisco Vasquez de Coronado between 1540 and 1542,
extending through portions of the States of Arizona, New Mexico, Texas,
Oklahoma, and Kansas.  The study under this paragraph shall be prepared in
accordance with subsection (b) of this section.  In conducting the study under
this paragraph, the Secretary shall provide for (A) the review of all original
Spanish documentation on the Coronado Trail, (B) the continuing search for new
primary documentation on the trail, and (C) the examination of all information
on the archeological sites along the trail.

  (33) The route from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama traveled by people in a
march dramatizing the need for voting rights legislation, in March 1965,
includes Sylvan South Street, Water Avenue, the Edmund Pettus Bridge, and
Highway 80. The study under this paragraph shall be prepared in accordance
with subsection (b) of this section, except that it shall be completed and
submitted to the Congress with recommendations as to the trail's suitability
for designation not later than 1 year after the enactment of this paragraph.

  (34) American Discovery Trail, extending from Pt. Reyes, California, across
the United States through Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri,
Iowa, Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland, and the District of
Columbia, to Cape Henlopen State Park, Delaware; to include in the central
United States a northern route through Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, and
Indiana and a southern route through Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, and
Indiana.

  (35) Ala Kahakai Trail in the State of Hawaii, an ancient Hawaiian trail on
the island of Hawaii extending from the northern tip of the Island of Hawaii
approximately 175 miles along the western and southern coasts to the northern
boundary of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

  (36) (A) El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, the approximately 1,800 mile
route extending from Mexico City, Mexico, across the international border at
El Paso, Texas, to Santa Fe, New Mexico.

      (B) The study shall (i) examine changing routes within the general
    corridor; (ii) examine major connecting branch routes; and (iii) give due
    consideration to alternative name designations.

      (C) The Secretary of the Interior is authorized to work in cooperation
    with the Government of Mexico (including, but not limited to providing
    technical assistance) to determine the suitability and feasibility of
    establishing an international historic route along the El Camino Real de
    Tierra Adentro.

  (37) (A) El Camino Real Para Los Texas, the approximate series of routes
from Saltillo, Monclova, and Guerrero, Mexico across Texas through San Antonio
and Nacogdoches, to the vicinity of Los Adaes, Louisiana, together with the
evolving routes later known as the San Antonio Road.

      (B) The study shall (i) examine the changing roads within the historic
    corridor; (ii) examine the major connecting branch routes; (iii)
    determine the individual or combined suitability and feasibility of
    routes for potential national historic trail designation; (iv) consider
    the preservation heritage plan developed by the Texas Department of
    Transportation entitled "A Texas Legacy: The Old San Antonio Road and the
    Caminos Reales", dated January, 1991; and (v) make recommendations
    concerning the suitability and feasibility of establishing an
    international historical park where the trail crosses the United
    States-Mexico border at Maverick County, Texas, and Guerrero, Mexico.

      (C) The Secretary of the Interior is authorized to work in cooperation
    with the government of Mexico (including, but not limited to providing
    technical assistance) to determine the suitability and feasibility of
    establishing an international historic trail along the El Camino Real
    Para Los Texas.

      (D) The study shall be undertaken in consultation with the Louisiana
    Department of Transportation and Development and the Texas Department of
    Transportation.

      (E) The study shall consider alternative name designations for the
    trail.

      (F) The study shall be completed no later than two years after the
    date funds are made available for the study.

(d) The Secretary charged with the administration of each respective trail
shall, within one year of the date of the addition of any national scenic or
national historic trail to the system, and within sixty days of the enactment
of this sentence for the Appalachian and Pacific Crest National Scenic Trails,
establish an advisory council for each such trail, each of which councils
shall expire ten years from the date of its establishment, except that the
Advisory Council established for the Iditarod Historic Trail shall expire
twenty years from the date of its establishment.  If the appropriate Secretary
is unable to establish such an advisory council because of the lack of
adequate public interest, the Secretary shall so advise the appropriate
committees of the Congress.  The appropriate Secretary shall consult with such
council from time to time with respect to matters relating to the trail,
including the selection of rights-of-way, standards for the erection and
maintenance of markers along the trail, and the administration of the trail. 
The members of each advisory council, which shall not exceed thirty-five in
number, shall serve for a term of two years and without compensation as such,
but the Secretary may pay, upon vouchers signed by the chairman of the
council, the expenses reasonably incurred by the council and its members in
carrying out their responsibilities under this section.  Members of each
council shall be appointed by the appropriate Secretary as follows:

  (1) the head of each Federal department or independent agency administering
  lands through which the trail route passes, or his designee;

  (2) a member appointed to represent each State through which the trail
  passes, and such appointments shall be made from recommendations of the
  Governors of such States;

  (3) one or more members appointed to represent private organizations,
  including corporate and individual landowners and land users, which in the
  opinion of the Secretary, have an established and recognized interest in
  the trail, and such appointments shall be made from recommendations of the
  heads of such organizations: Provided, That the Appalachian Trail
  Conference shall be represented by a sufficient number of persons to
  represent the various sections of the country through which the Appalachian
  Trail passes; and

  (4) the Secretary shall designate one member to be chairman and shall fill
  vacancies in the same manner as the original appointment.

  (e) Within two complete fiscal years of the date of enactment of
legislation designating a national scenic trail, except for the Continental
Divide National Scenic Trail and the North Country National Scenic Trail, as
part of the system, and within two complete fiscal years of the date of
enactment of this subsection for the Pacific Crest and Appalachian Trails, the
responsible Secretary shall, after full consultation with affected Federal
land managing agencies, the Governors of the affected States, the relevant
advisory council established pursuant to section 5(d), and the Appalachian
Trail Conference in the case of the Appalachian Trail, submit to the Committee
on Interior and Insular Affairs of the House of Representatives and the
Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the Senate, a comprehensive plan
for the acquisition, management, development, and use of the trail, including
but not limited to, the following items:

  (1) specific objectives and practices to be observed in the management of
  the trail, including the identification of all significant natural,
  historical, and cultural resources to be preserved (along with high
  potential historic sites and high potential route segments  in the case of
  national historic trails), details of any anticipated cooperative
  agreements to be consummated with other entities, and an identified
  carrying capacity of the trail and a plan for its implementation;

  (2) an acquisition or protection plan, by fiscal year for all lands to be
  acquired by fee title or lesser interest, along with detailed explanation
  of anticipated necessary cooperative agreements for any lands not to be
  acquired; and

  (3) general and site-specific development plans including anticipated
  costs.

(f) Within two complete fiscal years of the date of enactment of legislation
designating a national historic trail or the Continental Divide National
Scenic Trail or the North Country National Scenic Trail as part of the system,
the responsible Secretary shall, after full consultation with affected Federal
land managing agencies, the Governors of the affected States, and the relevant
Advisory Council established pursuant to section 5(d) of this Act, submit to
the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs of the House of Representatives
and the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the Senate, a
comprehensive plan for the management, and use of the trail, including but not
limited to, the following items:

  (1) specific objectives and practices to be observed in the management of
  the trail, including the identification of all significant natural,
  historical, and cultural resources to be preserved, details of any
  anticipated cooperative agreements to be consummated with State and local
  government agencies or private interests,  and for national scenic or
  national historic trails an identified carrying capacity of the trail and a
  plan for its implementation; 

  (2) the process to be followed by the appropriate Secretary to implement
  the marking requirements established in section 7(c) of this Act;

  (3) a protection plan for any high potential historic sites or high
  potential route segments; and

  (4) general and site-specific development plans, including anticipated
  costs. 


                    SEC. 6.  CONNECTING AND SIDE TRAILS

  Connecting or side trails within park, forest, and other recreation areas
administered by the Secretary of the Interior or Secretary of Agriculture may
be established, designated, and marked by the appropriate Secretary as
components of a national recreation, national scenic or national historic
trail.  When no Federal land acquisition is involved, connecting or side
trails may be located across lands administered by interstate, State, or local
governmental agencies with their consent, or, where the appropriate Secretary
deems necessary or desirable, on privately owned lands with the consent of the
landowners.  Applications for approval and designation of connecting and side
trails on non-Federal lands shall be submitted to the appropriate Secretary.


                  SEC. 7.  ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT

(a)(1) (A) The Secretary charged with the overall administration of a trail
pursuant to section 5(a) shall, in administering and managing the trail,
consult with the heads of all other affected State and Federal agencies. 
Nothing contained in this Act shall be deemed to transfer among Federal
agencies any management responsibilities established under any other law for
federally administered lands which are components of the National Trails
System.  Any transfer of management responsibilities may be carried out
between the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture only as
provided under subparagraph (B).

  (B) The Secretary charged with the overall administration of any trail
  pursuant to section 5(a) may transfer management of any specified trail
  segment of such trail to the other appropriate Secretary pursuant to a
  joint memorandum of agreement containing such terms and conditions as the
  Secretaries consider most appropriate to accomplish the purposes of this
  Act.  During any period in which management responsibilities for any trail
  segment are transferred under such an agreement, the management of any such
  segment shall be subject to the laws, rules, and regulations of the
  Secretary provided with the management authority under the agreement except
  to such extent as the agreement may otherwise expressly provide. 

    (2) Pursuant to section 5(a), the appropriate Secretary shall select the
    rights-of-way for national scenic and national historic trails and shall
    publish notice thereof of the availability of appropriate maps or
    descriptions in the Federal Register; Provided, That in selecting the
    rights-of-way full consideration shall be given to minimizing the adverse
    effects upon the adjacent landowner or user and his operation. 
    Development and management of each segment of the National Trails System
    shall be designed to harmonize with and complement any established
    multiple-use plans for the specific area in order to insure continued
    maximum benefits from the land.  The location and width of such
    rights-of-way across Federal lands under the jurisdiction of another
    Federal agency shall be by agreement between the head of that agency and
    the appropriate Secretary.  In selecting rights-of-way for trail
    purposes, the Secretary shall obtain the advice and assistance of the
    States, local governments, private organizations, and landowners and land
    users concerned.

(b) After publication of notice of the availability of appropriate maps or
descriptions in the Federal Register, the Secretary charged with the
administration of a national scenic or national historic trail may relocate
segments of a national scenic or national historic trail right-of-way with the
concurrence of the head of the Federal agency having jurisdiction over the
lands involved, upon a determination that:  (i) Such a relocation is necessary
to preserve the purposes for which the trail was established, or (ii) the
relocation is necessary to promote a sound land management program in
accordance with established multiple-use principles:  Provided, That a
substantial relocation of the rights-of-way for such trail shall be by Act of
Congress.

(c) National scenic or national historic trails may contain campsites,
shelters, and related-public-use facilities.  Other uses along the trail,
which will not substantially interfere with the nature and purposes of the
trail, may be permitted by the Secretary charged with the administration of
the trail.  Reasonable efforts shall be made to provide sufficient access
opportunities to such trails and, to the extent practicable, efforts be made
to avoid activities incompatible with the purposes for which such trails were
established.  The use of motorized vehicles by the general public along any
national scenic trail shall be prohibited and nothing in this Act shall be
construed as authorizing the use of motorized vehicles within the natural and
historical areas of the national park system, the national wildlife refuge
system, the national wilderness preservation system where they are presently
prohibited or on other Federal lands where trails are designated as being
closed to such use by the appropriate Secretary:  Provided, That the Secretary
charged with the administration of such trail shall establish regulations
which shall authorize the use of motorized vehicles when, in his judgment,
such vehicles are necessary to meet emergencies or to enable adjacent
landowners or land users to have reasonable access to their lands or timber
rights:  Provided further, That private lands included in the national
recreation, national scenic, or national historic trails by cooperative
agreement of a landowner shall not preclude such owner from using motorized
vehicles on or across such trails or adjacent lands from time to time in
accordance with regulations to be established by the appropriate Secretary. 
Where a national historic trail follows existing public roads, developed
rights-of-way or waterways, and similar features of man's nonhistorically
related development, approximating the original location of a historic route,
such segments may be marked to facilitate retracement of the historic route,
and where a national historic trail parallels an existing public road, such
road may be marked to commemorate the historic route.  Other uses along the
historic trails and the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail, which will
not substantially interfere with the nature and purposes of the trail, and
which, at the time of designation, are allowed by administrative regulations,
including the use of motorized vehicles, shall be permitted by the Secretary
charged with administration of the trail.  The Secretary of the Interior and
the Secretary of Agriculture, in consultation with appropriate governmental
agencies and public and private organizations, shall establish a uniform
marker, including thereon an appropriate and distinctive symbol for each
national recreation, national scenic, and national historic trail.  Where the
trails cross lands administered by Federal agencies such markers shall be
erected at appropriate points along the trails and maintained by the Federal
agency administering the trail in accordance with standards established by the
appropriate Secretary and where the trails cross non-Federal lands, in
accordance with written cooperative agreements, the appropriate Secretary
shall provide such uniform markers to cooperating agencies and shall require
such agencies to erect and maintain them in accordance with the standards
established.  The appropriate Secretary may also provide for trail
interpretation sites, which shall be located at historic sites along the route
of any national scenic or national historic trail, in order to present
information to the public about the trail, at the lowest possible cost, with
emphasis on the portion of the trail passing through the State in which the
site is located.  Wherever possible, the sites shall be maintained by a State
agency under a cooperative agreement between the appropriate Secretary and the
State agency.

(d) Within the exterior boundaries of areas under their administration that
are included in the right-of-way selected for a national recreation, national
scenic, or national historic trail, the heads of Federal agencies may use
lands for trail purposes and may acquire lands or interests in lands by
written cooperative agreement, donation, purchase with donated or appropriated
funds or exchange.

(e) Where the lands included in a national scenic or national historic trail
right-of-way are outside of the exterior boundaries of federally administered
areas, the Secretary charged with the administration of such trail shall
encourage the States or local governments involved (1) to enter into written
cooperative agreements with landowners, private organizations, and individuals
to provide the necessary trail right-of-way, or (2) to acquire such lands or
interests therein to be utilized as segments of the national scenic or
national historic trail: Provided, That if the State or local governments fail
to enter into such written cooperative agreements or to acquire such lands or
interests therein after notice of the selection of the right-of-way is
published, the appropriate Secretary, may (i) enter into such agreements with
landowners, States, local governments, private organizations, and individuals
for the use of lands for trail purposes, or (ii) acquire private lands or
interests therein by donation, purchase with donated or appropriated funds or
exchange in accordance with the provisions of subsection (f) of this section:
Provided further, That the appropriate Secretary may acquire lands or
interests therein from local governments or governmental corporations with the
consent of such entities.  The lands involved in such rights-of-way should be
acquired in fee, if other methods of public control are not sufficient to
assure their use for the purpose for which they are acquired:  Provided, That
if the Secretary charged with the administration of such trail permanently
relocates the right-of-way and disposes of all title or interest in the land,
the original owner, or his heirs or assigns, shall be offered, by notice given
at the former owner's last known address, the right of first refusal at the
fair market price.

(f)  (1) The Secretary of the Interior, in the exercise of his exchange
authority, may accept title to any non-Federal property within the
right-of-way and in exchange therefor he may convey to the grantor of such
property any federally owned property under his jurisdiction which is located
in the State wherein such property is located and which he classifies as
suitable for exchange or other disposal.  The values of the properties so
exchanged either shall be approximately equal, or if they are not
approximately equal the values shall be equalized by the payment of cash to
the grantor or to the Secretary as the circumstances require.  The Secretary
of Agriculture, in the exercise of his exchange authority, may utilize
authorities and procedures available to him in connection with exchanges of
national forest lands.

  (2) In acquiring lands or interests therein for a National Scenic or
Historic Trail, the appropriate Secretary may, with consent of a landowner,
acquire whole tracts notwithstanding that parts of such tracts may lie outside
the area of trail acquisition.  In furtherance of the purposes of this act,
lands so acquired outside the area of trail acquisition may be exchanged for
any non-Federal lands or interests therein within the trail right-of-way, or
disposed of in accordance with such procedures or regulations as the
appropriate Secretary shall prescribe, including:  (i) provisions for
conveyance of such acquired lands or interests therein at not less than fair
market value to the highest bidder, and (ii) provisions for allowing the last
owners of record a right to purchase said acquired lands or interests therein
upon payment or agreement to pay an amount equal to the highest bid price. 
For lands designated for exchange or disposal, the appropriate Secretary may
convey these lands with any reservations or covenants deemed desirable to
further the purposes of this Act.  The proceeds from any disposal shall be
credited to the appropriation bearing the costs of land acquisition for the
affected trail.

(g) The appropriate Secretary may utilize condemnation proceedings without the
consent of the owner to acquire private lands or interests, therein pursuant
to this section only in cases where, in his judgment, all reasonable efforts
to acquire such lands or interest therein by negotiation have failed, and in
such cases he shall acquire only such title as, in his judgment, is reasonably
necessary to provide passage across such lands: Provided, That condemnation
proceedings may not be utilized to acquire fee title or lesser interests to
more than an average of one hundred and twenty-five acres per mile.  Money
appropriated for Federal purposes from the land and water conservation fund
shall, without prejudice to appropriations from other sources, be available to
Federal departments for the acquisition of lands or interests in lands for the
purposes of this Act.  For national historic trails, direct Federal
acquisition for trail purposes shall be limited to those areas indicated by
the study report or by the comprehensive plan as high potential route segments
or high potential historic sites.  Except for designated protected components
of the trail, no land or site located along a designated national historic
trail or along the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail shall be subject
to the provisions of section 4(f) of the Department of Transportation Act (49
U.S.C. 1653(f)) unless such land or site is deemed to be of historical
significance under appropriate historical site criteria such as those for the
National Register of Historic Places. 

(h)  (1) The Secretary charged with the administration of a national
recreation, national scenic, or national historic trail shall provide for the
development and maintenance of such trails within federally administered
areas, and shall cooperate with and encourage the States to operate, develop,
and maintain portions of such trails which are located outside the boundaries
of federally administered areas.  When deemed to be in the public interest,
such Secretary may enter written cooperative agreements with the States or
their political subdivisions, landowners, private organizations, or
individuals to operate, develop, and maintain any portion of such a trail
either within or outside a federally administered area.  Such agreements may
include provisions for limited financial assistance to encourage participation
in the acquisition, protection, operation, development, or maintenance of such
trails, provisions providing volunteer in the park or volunteer in the forest
status (in accordance with the Volunteers in the Parks Act of 1969 and the
Volunteers in the Forests Act of 1972) to individuals, private organizations,
or landowners participating in such activities, or provisions of both types. 
The appropriate Secretary shall also initiate consultations with affected
States and their political subdivisions to encourage --

    (A) the development and implementation by such entities of appropriate
    measures to protect private landowners from trespass resulting from trail
    use and from unreasonable personal liability and property damage caused
    by trail use, and

    (B) the development and implementation by such entities of provisions for
    land practices compatible with the purposes of this Act, for property
    within or adjacent to trail rights-of-way.  After consulting with States
    and their political subdivisions under the preceding sentence, the
    Secretary may provide assistance to such entities under appropriate
    cooperative agreements in the manner provided by this subsection.

  (2) Whenever the Secretary of the Interior makes any conveyance of land
under any of the public land laws, he may reserve a right-of-way for trails to
the extent he deems necessary to carry out the purposes of this Act.

(i) The appropriate Secretary, with the concurrence of the heads of any other
Federal agencies administering lands through which a national recreation,
national scenic, or national historic trail passes, and after consultation
with the States, local governments, and organizations concerned, may issue
regulations, which may be revised from time to time, governing the use,
protection, management, development, and administration of trails of the
national trails system.  In order to maintain good conduct on and along the
trails located within federally administered areas and to provide for the
proper government and protection of such trails, the Secretary of the Interior
and the Secretary of Agriculture shall prescribe and publish such uniform
regulations as they deem necessary and any person who violates such
regulations shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and may be punished by a fine of
not more $500 or by imprisonment not exceeding six months, or by both such
fine and imprisonment.  The Secretary responsible for the administration of
any segment of any component of the National Trails System (as determined in a
manner consistent with subsection (a)(1) of this section) may also utilize
authorities related to units of the national park system or the national
forest system, as the case may be, in carrying out his administrative
responsibilities for such component. 

(j) Potential trail uses allowed on designated components of the national
trails system may include, but are not limited to, the following: bicycling,
cross-country skiing, day hiking, equestrian activities, jogging or similar
fitness activities, trail biking, overnight and long-distance backpacking,
snowmobiling, and surface water and underwater activities.  Vehicles which may
be permitted on certain trails may include, but need not be limited to,
motorcycles, bicycles, four-wheel drive or all- terrain off-road vehicles.  In
addition, trail access for handicapped individuals may be provided.  The
provisions of this subsection shall not supersede any other provisions of this
Act or other Federal laws, or any State or local laws.

(k) For the conservation purpose of preserving or enhancing the recreational,
scenic, natural, or historical values of components of the national trails
system, and environs thereof as determined by the appropriate Secretary,
landowners are authorized to donate or otherwise convey qualified real
property interests to qualified organizations consistent with section
170(h)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, including, but not limited to,
right-of-way, open space, scenic, or conservation easements, without regard to
any limitation on the nature of the estate or interest otherwise transferable
within the jurisdiction where the land is located.  The conveyance of any such
interest in land in accordance with this subsection shall be deemed to further
a Federal conservation policy and yield a significant public benefit for
purposes of section 6 of Public Law 96-541.


                SEC. 8.  STATE AND METROPOLITAN AREA TRAILS

(a) The Secretary of the Interior is directed to encourage States to consider,
in their comprehensive statewide outdoor recreation plans and proposals for
financial assistance for State and local projects submitted pursuant to the
Land and Water Conservation Fund Act, needs and opportunities for establishing
park, forest, and other recreation and historic trails on lands owned or
administered by States, and recreation and historic trails on lands in or near
urban areas.  The Secretary is also directed to encourage States to consider,
in their comprehensive statewide historic preservation plans and proposals for
financial assistance for State, local, and private projects submitted pursuant
to the Act of October 15, 1966 (80 Stat. 915), as amended, needs and
opportunities for establishing historic trails.  He is further directed in 
accordance with the authority contained in the Act of May 28, 1963 (77 Stat.
49), to encourage States, political subdivisions, and private interests,
including nonprofit organizations, to establish such trails.

(b) The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development is directed, in
administering the program of comprehensive urban planning and assistance under
section 701 of the Housing Act of 1954, to encourage the planning of
recreation trails in connection with the recreation and transportation
planning for metropolitan and other urban areas.  He is further directed, in
administering the urban openspace program under title VII of the Housing Act
of 1961, to encourage such recreation trails.

(c) The Secretary of Agriculture is directed, in accordance with authority
vested in him, to encourage States and local agencies and private interests to
establish such trails.

(d) The Secretary of Transportation, the Chairman of the Interstate Commerce
Commission, and the Secretary of the Interior, in administering the Railroad
Revitalization and Regulatory Reform Act of 1976, shall encourage State and
local agencies and private interests to establish appropriate trails using the
provisions of such programs.  Consistent with the purposes of that Act, and in
furtherance of the national policy to preserve established railroad
rights-of-way for future reactivation of rail service, to protect rail
transportation corridors, and to encourage energy efficient transportation
use, in the case of interim use of any established railroad rights-of-way
pursuant to donation, transfer, lease, sale, or otherwise in a manner
consistent with the National Trails System Act, if such interim use is subject
to restoration or reconstruction for railroad purposes, such interim use shall
not be treated, for purposes of any law or rule of law, as an abandonment of
the use of such rights-of-way for railroad purposes.  If a State, political
subdivision, or qualified private organization is prepared to assume full
responsibility for management of such rights-of-way and for any legal
liability arising out of such transfer or use, and for the payment of any and
all taxes that may be levied or assessed against such rights-of-way, then the
Commission shall impose such terms and conditions as a requirement of any
transfer or conveyance for interim use in a manner consistent with this Act,
and shall not permit abandonment or discontinuance inconsistent or disruptive
of such use.

(e) Such trails may be designated and suitably marked as parts of the
nationwide system of trails by the States, their political subdivisions, or
other appropriate administering agencies with the approval of the Secretary of
the Interior.


                SEC. 9.  RIGHTS-OF-WAY AND OTHER PROPERTIES

(a) The Secretary of the Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture as the case
may be, may grant easements and rights-of-way upon, over, under, across, or
along any component of the national trails system in accordance with the laws
applicable to the national park system and the national forest system,
respectively: Provided, That any conditions contained in such easements and
rights-of- way shall be related to the policy and purposes of this Act.

(b) The Department of Defense, the Department of Transportation, the
Interstate Commerce Commission, the Federal Communications Commission, the
Federal Power Commission, and other Federal agencies having jurisdiction or
control over or information concerning the use, abandonment, or disposition of
roadways, utility rights-of-way, or other properties which may be suitable for
the purpose of improving or expanding the national trails system shall
cooperate with the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture
in order to assure, to the extent practicable, that any such properties having
values suitable for trail purposes may be made available for such use.

(c) Commencing upon the date of enactment of this subsection, any and all
right, title, interest, and estate of the United States in all rights-of-way
of the type described in the Act of March 8, 1922 (43 U.S.C. 912), shall
remain in the United States upon the abandonment or forfeiture of such
rights-of-way, or portions thereof, except to the extent that any such
right-of-way, or portion thereof, is embraced within a public highway no later
than one year after a determination of abandonment or forfeiture, as provided
under such Act.

(d)  (1) All rights-of-way, or portions thereof, retained by the United States
pursuant to subsection (c) which are located within the boundaries of a
conservation system unit or a National Forest shall be added to and
incorporated within such unit or National Forest and managed in accordance
with applicable provisions of law, including this Act.

  (2) All such retained rights-of-way, or portions thereof, which are located
  outside the boundaries of a conservation system unit or a National Forest
  but adjacent to or contiguous with any portion of the public lands shall be
  managed pursuant to the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 and
  other applicable law, including this section.

  (3) All such retained rights-of-way, or portions thereof, which are located
  outside the boundaries of a conservation system unit or National Forest
  which the Secretary of the Interior determines suitable for use as a public
  recreational trail or other recreational purposes shall be managed by the
  Secretary for such uses, as well as for such other uses as the Secretary
  determines to be appropriate pursuant to applicable laws, as long as such
  uses do not preclude trail use.

(e)  (l) The Secretary of the Interior is authorized where appropriate to
release and quitclaim to a unit of government or to another entity meeting the
requirements of this subsection any and all right, title, and interest in the
surface estate of any portion of any right-of-way to the extent any such
right, title, and interest was retained by the United States pursuant to
subsection (c), if such portion is not located within the boundaries of any
conservation system unit or National Forest.  Such release and quitclaim shall
be made only in response to an application therefor by a unit of State or
local government or another entity which the Secretary of the Interior
determines to be legally and financially qualified to manage the relevant
portion for public recreational purposes.  Upon receipt of such an
application, the Secretary shall publish a notice concerning such application
in a newspaper of general circulation in the area where the relevant portion
is located.  Such release and quitclaim shall be on the following conditions: 

  (A) If such unit or entity attempts to sell, convey, or otherwise transfer
  such right, title, or interest or attempts to permit the use of any part of
  such portion for any purpose incompatible with its use for public
  recreation, then any and all right, title, and interest released and
  quitclaimed by the Secretary pursuant to this subsection shall revert to
  the United States.

  (B) Such unit or entity shall assume full responsibility and hold the
  United States harmless for any legal liability which might arise with
  respect to the transfer, possession, use, release, or quitclaim of such
  right-of-way.

  (C) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the United States shall be
  under no duty to inspect such portion prior to such release and quitclaim,
  and shall incur no legal liability with respect to any hazard or any unsafe
  condition existing on such portion at the time of such release and
  quitclaim.

  (2) The Secretary is authorized to sell any portion of a right-of-way
  retained by the United States pursuant to subsection (c) located outside
  the boundaries of a conservation system unit or National Forest if any such
  portion is --

    (A) not adjacent to or contiguous with any portion of the public lands;
    or

    (B) determined by the Secretary, pursuant to the disposal criteria
    established by section 203 of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act
    of 1976, to be suitable for sale.

    Prior to conducting any such sale, the Secretary shall take appropriate
    steps to afford a unit of State or local government or any other entity
    an opportunity to seek to obtain such portion pursuant to paragraph (l)
    of this subsection.

  (3) All proceeds from sales of such retained rights of way shall be
  deposited into the Treasury of the United States and credited to the Land
  and Water Conservation Fund as provided in section 2 of the Land and Water
  Conservation Fund Act of 1965.

  (4) The Secretary of the Interior shall annually report to the Congress the
  total proceeds from sales under paragraph (2) during the preceding fiscal
  year.  Such report shall be included in the President's annual budget
  submitted to the Congress.

(f) As used in this section --

  (1) The term "conservation system unit" has the same meaning given such
  term in the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (Public Law
  96-487; 94 Stat. 2371 et seq.), except that such term shall also include
  units outside Alaska.

  (2) The term "public lands" has the same meaning given such term in the
  Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976.


                 SEC. 10.  AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

(a) (1) There are hereby authorized to be appropriated for the acquisition of
lands or interests in lands not more than $5,000,000 for the Appalachian
National Scenic Trail and not more than $500,000 for the Pacific Crest
National Scenic Trail.  From the appropriations authorized for fiscal year
1979 and succeeding fiscal years pursuant to the Land and Water Conservation
Fund Act (78 Stat. 897), as amended, not more than the following amounts may
be expended for the acquisition of lands and interests in lands authorized to
be acquired pursuant to the provisions of this Act:  for the Appalachian
National Scenic Trail, not to exceed $30,000,000 for fiscal year 1979,
$30,000,000 for fiscal year 1980, and $30,000,000 for fiscal year 1981, except
that the difference between the foregoing amounts and the actual
appropriations in any one fiscal year shall be available for appropriation in
subsequent fiscal years.

  (2) It is the express intent of the Congress that the Secretary should
  substantially complete the land acquisition program necessary to insure the
  protection of the Appalachian Trail within three complete fiscal years
  following the date of enactment of this sentence.  Until the entire
  acquisition program is completed, he shall transmit in writing at the close
  of each fiscal year the following information to the Committee on Energy
  and Natural Resources of the Senate and the Committee on Interior and
  Insular Affairs of the House of Representatives:

    (A) the amount of land acquired during the fiscal year and the amount     
                   expended therefor;

    (B) the estimated amount of land remaining to be acquired; and 

    (C) the amount of land planned for acquisition in the ensuing fiscal year 
                       and the estimated cost thereof.

(b) For the purposes of Public Law 95-42 (91 Stat. 211), the lands and
interests therein acquired pursuant to this section shall be deemed to qualify
for funding under the provisions of section 1, clause 2, of said Act.

(c)  (1) There is hereby authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be
necessary to implement the provisions of this Act relating to the trails
designated by paragraphs 5(a)(3), (4), (5), (6), (7), (8), (9) and (10): 
Provided, That no such funds are authorized to be appropriated prior to
October 1, 1978:  And provided further, That notwithstanding any other
provisions of this Act or any other provisions of law, no funds may be
expended by Federal agencies for the acquisition of lands or interests in
lands outside the exterior boundaries of existing Federal areas for the
Continental Divide National Scenic Trail, the North Country National Scenic
Trail, The Ice Age National Scenic Trail, the Oregon National Historic Trail,
the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail, the Lewis and Clark National
Historic Trail, and the Iditarod National Historic Trail, except that funds
may be expended for the acquisition of lands or interests therein for the
purpose of providing for one trail interpretation site, as described in
section 7(c), along with such trail in each State crossed by the trail. 

  (2) Except as otherwise provided in this Act, there is authorized to be
  appropriated such sums as may be necessary to implement the provisions of
  this Act relating to the trails designated by section 5(a).   Not more than
  $500,000 may be appropriated for the purposes of acquisition of land and
  interests therein for the trail designated by section 5(a)(12) of this Act,
  and not more than $2,000,000 may be appropriated for the purposes of the
  development of such trail.  The administrating agency for the trail shall
  encourage volunteer trail groups to participate in the development of the
  trail.


                   SEC. 11.  VOLUNTEER TRAILS ASSISTANCE

(a) (1) In addition to the cooperative agreement and other authorities
contained in this Act, the Secretary of the Interior, the Secretary of
Agriculture, and the head of any Federal agency administering Federal lands,
are authorized to encourage volunteers and volunteer organizations to plan,
develop, maintain, and manage, where appropriate, trails throughout the
Nation.

  (2) Wherever appropriate in furtherance of the purposes of this Act, the
Secretaries are authorized and encouraged to utilize the Volunteers in the
Parks Act of 1969, the Volunteers in the Forests Act of 1972, and section 6 of
the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965 (relating to the development
of Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plans).

(b) Each Secretary or the head of any Federal land managing agency, may assist
volunteers and volunteers organizations in planning, developing, maintaining,
and managing trails.  Volunteer work may include, but need not be limited to--

  (1) planning, developing, maintaining, or managing (A) trails which are
  components of the national trails system, or (B) trails which, if so
  developed and maintained, could qualify for designation as components of
  the national trails system; or

  (2) operating programs to organize and supervise volunteer trail building
  efforts with respect to the trails referred to in paragraph (1), conducting
  trail-related research projects, or providing education and training to
  volunteers on methods of trails planning, construction, and maintenance.

(c) The appropriate Secretary or the head of any Federal land managing agency
may utilize and to make available Federal facilities, equipment, tools, and
technical assistance to volunteers and volunteer organizations, subject to
such limitations and restrictions as the appropriate Secretary or the head of
any Federal land managing agency deems necessary or desirable.

                           SEC. 12.  DEFINITIONS

As used in this Act:

  (1) The term "high potential historic sites" means those historic sites
related to the route, or sites in close proximity thereto, which provide
opportunity to interpret the historic significance of the trail during the
period of its major use.  Criteria for consideration as high potential sites
include historic significance, presence of visible historic remnants, scenic
quality, and relative freedom from intrusion.

  (2) The term "high potential route segments" means those segments of a
trail which would afford high quality recreation experience in a portion of
the route having greater than average scenic values or affording an
opportunity to vicariously share the experience of the original users of a
historic route.

  (3) The term "State" means each of the several States of the United States,
the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands,
Guam, American Samoa, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, the Northern
Mariana Islands, and any other territory or possession of the United States.

  (4) The term "without expense to the United States" means that no funds may
be expended by Federal agencies for the development of trail related
facilities or for the acquisition of lands or interest in lands outside the
exterior boundaries of Federal areas.  For the purposes of the preceding
sentence, amounts made available to any State or political subdivision under
the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965 or any other provision of law
shall not be treated as an expense to the United States.